Very Noob question regarding finishes

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by piloto117, Jan 28, 2012.

  1. piloto117

    piloto117 Member

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    Out of curiosity, is it possible to sandout a polyfinish guitar without affecting the original color and later refinish it with a lacquer finish?
     
  2. rockonomics

    rockonomics Member

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    I'm not sure what you're trying to do. If you want to change color and use lacquer it's just a matter of scuff sanding to break the gloss, feather edge the chips and use a shellac based primer followed by the lacquer. If you want to put clear lacquer over poly,......why?
     
  3. Whiskeyrebel

    Whiskeyrebel Member

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    I think OP wants to remove only the poly clearcoat, keep the original color coat, and put a new lacquer clearcoat over it.
     
  4. K-Line

    K-Line Gold Supporting Member

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    I do not think it would work. It is a fine line between the basecoat and the clear.
     
  5. Whiskeyrebel

    Whiskeyrebel Member

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    I've wanted to do the opposite: remove a deteriorated nitro clearcoat and put a new clearcoat over the original paint. I haven't worked up the nerve to try it or gotten any sure instructions how to do it safely.
     
  6. Rhomco

    Rhomco Silver Supporting Member

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    From a poly base is easy. Just wipe the lacquer off using lacquer thinner.
    Good luck on your project,
    Rob
     
  7. pb641

    pb641 Member

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    Whiskey, this happens to be an area I know enough of to get us all in trouble, but I am pretty handy with a spray gun.
    1. The color you are talking about reaching is probably sprayed on toner, especially true with "bursts". If that is the case, no, you won't be able to just sand down through the gloss coat.
    2. You also need to find out from the manufacturer what kind of paint was used; i.e. poly / mineral spirits type, or lacquer which is cut with thinner.
    3. If you are happy enough with the color, and it's intact, you can simply respray the clear coat. To do that you sand or rough up the existing coat with say 600 grit wet paper, then shoot a sealer, wet sand with say 800, clean, tack rag, spray sealer, wet sand with around 1200, clean, tack, spray your clear product of choice.
    4. Don't underestimate the power of a seal coat. They were traditionally used to literally "seal" glazes in furniture, prior to the top coat of clear. Here, you would be using the seal coat to separate finish types. Think of it as clear primer that separates your existing finish from the new clear top coats.
    5. Apply your top coats the same as described above.
    6. Getting in a hurry will ruin all previous work.
    7. Pay attention to temperature and humidity.

    If you have any specific questions at this point, I'll do my best to help you out, but there is an unbelievable amount of info out there.
     
  8. Whiskeyrebel

    Whiskeyrebel Member

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    The base coat is Pelham blue from around 67 or so. It's an SG/MM. I don't know whether that's a poly or lacquer color coat.
     
  9. pb641

    pb641 Member

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    And I don't know either which is why I discussed the sealer coat stuff.
     
  10. Stike

    Stike Member

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    See below.

    See above.
     
  11. rockonomics

    rockonomics Member

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    It may be nitro. Ain't SG/MM's done in nitro? Why not get some Deft clear, which is nitro lacquer, remove a p/g or something and try brushing a small amount in a hidden spot. It the original finish is nitro it will slightly melt the coat under it and not turn in to a blister mobile. If it's poly it will just lay on the surface and you'll be able to rub it off after 24 hrs.
     
  12. Whiskeyrebel

    Whiskeyrebel Member

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    The clearcoat is nitro for certain, because it's heavily checked and yellowed everywhere except under the pickguard. The original paint color under the pickguard looks so much better where the nitro isn't damaged. I suppose I could rub some thinner in a spot under the guard and see if the blue comes away with the lacquer.
     
  13. piloto117

    piloto117 Member

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    Thanks guys! I'll try to find out a little bit more about the paint/finish before even attempting at doing something like this.
     
  14. mesa/kramer

    mesa/kramer Member

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    :huh

    Why you lookin' to ruin the value of a vintage guitar by altering the finish? :huh

    Let's see some pics? :rolleyes:
     

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