Vibrato. How is yours?

Discussion in 'Playing and Technique' started by DaveSemach, Aug 19, 2009.

  1. gennation

    gennation Member

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    I think vibrato is the personal side of playing, as well as other inflection type aspect like how we slide and bend. Everybody has the same notes but how you attach them/ and finesse them is what makes us all different.

    Think of it as a singer, a long of people sing in the same range but it's those inflection that set them apart and make them recognizable.

    And yes, I have always felt solid with my vibrato but it's some I'm still molding as sometimes I'll run into a sound in my head or a from a song that I need to push the vibrato slightly different form anything I've ever done (conscientiously) before.
     
  2. alvarete

    alvarete Member

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    Mine is terrible. It's something I'm trying to improve.
     
  3. brothertupelo

    brothertupelo Senior Member

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    i'll be honest, other than that quick run around 1:42, that was a complete waste of my time. i've heard better little wings at guitar center. incredibly boring.
     
  4. jimification

    jimification Member

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    For me vibrato is vital to the electric guitar like perspective is to painting. If the basic perspective is off it's never going to look right however good the rest of your painting skills are.

    A couple of years ago I looked up Megadeth's "Tornado of souls" solo on youtube as I wanted to learn it. Maybe I'm naiive but I was pretty shocked: I must have seen at least 30 clips of people that could play it (and it's a tough, pretty technical solo!) but only 1 guy could actually do decent sounding vibrato or any of Friedman's tasty bends - crazy!
     
  5. Yngtchie Blacksteen

    Yngtchie Blacksteen Member

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    Hey, I'm not the one talking trash about one of the most respected and praised fusion guitarists of the past 20 years.

    And just FYI:

    "The young Gambale was influenced by the blues playing of Jimi Hendrix, John Mayall/Eric Clapton, and Grateful Dead's Jerry Garcia and the music of the Beatles just to name a few."

    Of course, Gambale the fat, bald, white, effeminate guy shows no respect for wide vibrato, and he doesn't impress brothertupelo, so I guess I'll leave this debate after being bludgeoned to submission with all these hard-hitting and eloquent rebuttals. :aok
     
  6. iamstooky

    iamstooky Member

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    I get a kick out clapton's vibrato. its so smooth and really complements the rest of his nicely chosen chops.
     
  7. iamstooky

    iamstooky Member

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    agreed man, to be honest the whole thumb around the neck hendrix style makes a huge difference in tone. This guy's tone is so much closer closer to steve vai than it is hendrix.
     
  8. BluesForDan

    BluesForDan Member

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    angels weep. cities burn. sky is crying.















    not too full of myself, am I? :roll:Spank
     
  9. brothertupelo

    brothertupelo Senior Member

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    i don't know if that's true, but regardless, it was boring and cheesy.
     
  10. Scott Auld

    Scott Auld Staff Member

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    Disagreement is one thing, insults are another. Take the fights somewhere else, thanks.
     
  11. A440

    A440 Silver Supporting Member

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    I'm very limited in my abilities, but vibrato is something I definitely practiced and still work at.

    it is very interesting how different players approach it whether it's BB, Hendrix, Albert King or Gilmour...
     
  12. brothertupelo

    brothertupelo Senior Member

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    if you're gonna delete me for being insulting, delete the people who insulted me.
     
  13. Scott Auld

    Scott Auld Staff Member

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    How about I lock the whole thread, go back and read the rest of it and hand out infractions where appropriate? Would that be better than dropping in and just offering a warning, like I did?
     
  14. Scott Auld

    Scott Auld Staff Member

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    Actually, on 2nd thought, that's not fair to everyone else. I'll just deal with the perpetrators. Thread is back open.
     
  15. Scott Auld

    Scott Auld Staff Member

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    OP: thanks for posting the thread to get the topic started. Shame it went off the rails for a little while but let's let it get back on topic.

    On topic:

    I try to view vibrato as a function of rhythm.

    The speed of the vibrato hints at a beat, a tempo. This is a powerful tool that you can use to indicate lots of different things, be it in-tempo with the song or out of tempo. It's another kind of paintbrush.
     
  16. Frankenstrat2

    Frankenstrat2 Member

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    I admit I didn't read the entire thread post for post. I saw that my friend Tomo posted on it, and some others I know well. Its a good topic.
    I think for some, vibrato is something you have to work at and practice and think about/analyze/dissect. For others, it just comes naturally, like so many other things in the arts.
    I'm not a very good technical player, certainly not an educated musician. I never gave vibrato a thought, I just play. I never sat down to consciously cop vibrato as a 'style' like a 'Hendrix' vibrato, or a 'Clapton' vibrato. I never thought about it much in my own playing. It was just there, like blond hair or blue eyes. I 'think' I have a pleasing natural vibrato. At least in 50 years no one has ever complained about it.
    A number of years ago I read a Johnny Winter interview where he said something along the lines of "I can listen to a guitar player and decide if I like him in 30 seconds by his vibrato".
    I agree with Johnny. While I never thought about my own vibrato, I know when I hear someone else's that I dislike. It is chalk on a blackboard.
    If some choose to call it a color, or a choice, or another crayon in the box, fine. But I know when food is too salty for me, when milk is sour, and when vibrato sucks.
    The first time I analyzed vibrato was when I taught a seminar on slide guitar. Teaching and demonstrating the varieties of tremelo on bottleneck, as opposed to with the finger on the fret is a different skill set. In many ways its easier to dissect and control- there are less muscle functions involved. But it does help to understand the mechanics and their application in different instances.
    Sad to say, but I cant help but mentally dismiss many fine guitarists if they let loose with a vibrato that strikes me as unpleasant. Its like a smelly fart.
     
  17. Scott Auld

    Scott Auld Staff Member

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    Barry, that was a cool post. :)
     
  18. DaveSemach

    DaveSemach Member

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    Thanks Scott for Moderating
    As to what you said. I almost think it's cooler when you use a rhythmic device like tremolo or vibrato totally against the tempo.
     
  19. tbone666

    tbone666 Member

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    Usable vibrato has been my goal for the past year now.

    I've played since the mid-late 80's, and although there are many many players that i know that are far better, i do feel that i can hold my own based on theory and note choice. HOWEVER - a uasble if not sweet vib is the icing on the cake, imo.

    When i started looking into developing a more personal vibrato i kept reading "move from the arm not the hand", but ironically, although trying my damned-est to move from the forearm, it drastically changes depending on the finger doing the fretting which is frustrating.

    as i stated, i've played long enough to understand the instrument and know that technique takes time, BUT if there is a website out there that really delves into this topic with routines to pratice, that would be awesome. I suppose that subdividing with a metronome is probably the best way to go at it.

    I also loved reading the one post with certain emotions manifesting in a vibrato - wide versus narrow conveying overt emotions to more nuances, respectively. That's cool. This is the type of thing i missed by self teaching, opposed to being taught.

    This is the topic that i love reading more on. Thanks for starting this thread.

    I love the guitar.
     
  20. KRosser

    KRosser Member

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    Mine makes grown men weep and women lose their inhibitions...
     

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