Victor Wooten just simplified the crap out of Music Theory. Wow!

Discussion in 'The Sound Hound Lounge' started by jjboogie, Feb 13, 2018 at 7:56 AM.


  1. jjboogie

    jjboogie Supporting Member

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    So cool! Anyone else hip to this? Four minute mark is where the magic happens. ;-)




    For the record here is the full video. He's just giving one example of how simple parts of learning theory can be at his camp.

     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2018 at 3:05 PM
  2. Jonathan31

    Jonathan31 Member

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  3. C-RAM

    C-RAM Member

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  4. gigs

    gigs Member

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    7 * 6 = 42

    42 is always the answer. Simple.
     
  5. Simto

    Simto Member

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    I have about 99,5% no clue what he's talking about...
     
  6. twoheadedboy

    twoheadedboy Member

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    This is fun. Love Victor.

    Of course, Victor only simplified one tiny aspect of music theory. For me, the hard thing about music theory isn't so much understanding the mechanics of it, but becoming fluent enough with it to be able to apply it quickly and easily in real-world situations. I haven't found an easy way around that.
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2018 at 11:54 AM
  7. tms13pin

    tms13pin Supporting Member

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    Check out his CD Book: The Music Lesson very good listen and a lot of takeaway.

    --Tom
     
  8. DRS

    DRS Member

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    How does he get 15?
    Is he counting enharmonic keys such as Db/C#, Gb/F#, & B/Cb?
     
  9. NicDo

    NicDo Member

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    He always has great stuff to say about music education.
    I really like how he addresses the way music is taught in the Music Lesson- in terms of learning to speak.

    We take kids in band and orchestra and expect them to learn to read before they can actually speak (play) on their instrument.
    Would that ever work in language? No- and a huge reason why kids who spend 12 years in music instruction can't play their instrument without sheet music. They can mimic, but they can't play or a conversation. It seems like (outside the first chair folks) the more education they have in music- the less likely they keep it up or go on with it as adults.
    You need immersion to become fluent, and that's not the same as comprehending through reading.
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2018 at 1:14 PM
  10. jjboogie

    jjboogie Supporting Member

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    Just showed this to my wife and she got it immediately and flipped out that they didn't teach this when she was in school.
     
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  11. Jazzandmore

    Jazzandmore Silver Supporting Member

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    Very much agree! All of us can see books we have, magazines, YouTube vids we watch...but what do we do with it? For most of us, if we took just one book off our shelf and truly learned everything in it, devoted the months/years and could play it with ease, we'd be much better players. But that's not what we tend to do. Guys like Victor point out really cool and often simple stuff to us. There is one video, which I can't find, where he explains how to make a "wrong" note right. He starts off hitting this note and it sounds :confused:. But he just keeps talking to you while he's using the note and resolving it, etc., and before long it is the greatest sounding note ever. Just straight up great stuff in a 2 minute lesson. But do we take that stuff in and work month after month to really make it part of our playing? In most cases we don't.

    As @twoheadedboy says, there is no easy way around doing the work to become fluent.

    Great book! I love how he isn't trying to tell you what to play. He's trying to show you how to become a musician in a bigger and better sense and from there your playing will grow.
     
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  12. Tootone

    Tootone Member

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    Yes. Have a look at the Circle of Fifths.

    Ab is a key. G# is another key. They sound the same, but written differently on the stave.
     
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  13. Bryan T

    Bryan T Guitar Owner Silver Supporting Member

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    Cool tricks. The more interesting question (to me!) is “why do they work?”

    I suspect if you lined up the chromatic pitches in fifths, you’d see where the keys are (groups of sevens) and the order in which the pitches are augmented/diminished.

    ...EbBbFCGDAEBF#C#...
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2018 at 10:07 AM
  14. Papanate

    Papanate Gold Supporting Member

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    Music and Math - goes together like Bacon and Eggs.
    It should be noted that he is only simplifying a very
    small part of Music Theory. As @NicDo posted becoming
    fluent in any language is best accomplished through
    immersion.

    Immersion also explains why so many brilliant theorist
    musicians are weird as all heck! LOL!
     
  15. Big'Uns

    Big'Uns Member

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    I’ve tried repeatedly over the years to get into theory but it never lasts more than a week or two. It just feels like math homework, and I despise math. I can tell you where all the notes are on the fretboard (although not with flash card quickness) and I know a few scales but that’s about it. I’ve always played by sounding things out and trying to figure out the proper way to play songs by ear. But I have almost no ability to improvise. I’d love to change this but I haven’t found a teacher or method that gels with the way my brain is wired. I’d love for the lightbulb to go on but I’ve never been able to get there.

    Like the above poster said, I have almost no idea what he’s talking about in that vid.
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2018 at 10:16 AM
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  16. Bryan T

    Bryan T Guitar Owner Silver Supporting Member

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    Getting rid of flats altogether makes some keys really tough to read. Do you really want to read in A#?

    A# B# C## D# E# F## G##

    Not very simple!
     
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  17. orogeny

    orogeny Supporting Member

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    took me a bit to catch that
    also made me chuckle
    do you practice in every key?
    i realized the answer is NO
    even though i regularly practice up to 84 scales (yup-12 notes, 7 modes. . .. .i don't mess much with harmonic and melodic scales)
     
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  18. micycle

    micycle Member

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    Wooten the hell is he talking about? Just kidding, I can't resist a bad pun. Cool video, thanks for sharing!
     
  19. Hefalump

    Hefalump Member

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    I am just going to concentrate on making music that sounds good to me. Right or wrong by rules, I care not.
     
  20. orogeny

    orogeny Supporting Member

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    i don't see theory as a set of rules
    it's a language i can use to communicate to other people who speak it
    this song is a 1-5-4 in c originally. i sing it in D though.
    "sure, man". got it.
    no theory="what chords is that then?"
    or
    "I only know it in C"
     

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