Vintage Amp Restore Guys: Stockpiling or Selling Cheap? Poll

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs' started by pb641, Feb 10, 2012.

The best way to handle this market is?

  1. I'm not buying at all. Seems wait and see is best.

  2. Buying but cautious about market.

  3. Liquidating and won't buy til the market turns.

  4. Buying and selling, small profit is better than none.

Multiple votes are allowed.
Results are only viewable after voting.
  1. pb641

    pb641 Member

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    OK, so I think we can agree on a few basic facts:

    1. The market still sucks overall,
    2. The trend of smaller is better is killing older vintage amps,
    3. The perception that vintage amps will break on stage during the solo is killing the market, and
    4. Most people never get the chance to play vintage amps and dog them anyway.

    I'm not making this a Fender Super Reverb is the finest amp of all time thread. While true, I hope the Marshall, VOX, HIWATT, etc followers will jump in here.

    I also know that having read this section of the forum for about a year there appears to be two basic camps of folks working on these vintage amps. The hobbyist/do it yourself guys and then the pro folks who actually make a living in repair and restoration. I'm in the first group and repair or fully restore maybe 7 to 9 amps per year. My goal is simple: maintain my proficiency in electronics, gain personal satisfaction in preserving these fine amps, and making a small profit that allows me to fund my obsession of buying guitars and other amps that I clearly don't need but nonetheless have to possess.

    I have decided that I will continue buying amps as I come across them and if they are affordable, (also the more abused the better), and for now, I am inclined to just hold onto them in hopes of better days.

    Anyway, I'd like to hear what others are thinking on this topic. Again, any challenge to the basic premise of the supreme and unassailable position of the BF SR will be immediately flamed, castigated, and summarily dismissed from the thread without explanation, no appeal. :omg
     
  2. soldersucker

    soldersucker Member

    Messages:
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    I'm in the same quandary as you i like to buy amps restore and flip or keep.One thing i can tell you is i'm definitely more cautious now about amps +35 watts or so.
    Another thing is i'm bargaining harder money is made when you buy..
    As far as Super Reverbs yes they are more difficult to sell these days.Though i recently bought a mint 73 for 550.00 and flipped it for 950.00 some people still like the tones...keeping my 64 and 66:D
    Here's my latest project a 69 Plexi 50 watt that is coming along nicely(keeper)
    Before
    [​IMG]
    After
    [​IMG]
    [/B]
     
  3. chrisrocksusa

    chrisrocksusa Member

    Messages:
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    Location:
    Chicago, IL
    I have a burning desire to collect vintage amps like these, and more importantly tinker with them.

    Where do you learn to fix and mod these bad boys? Should I go back to school and study electrical engineering as a hobby?
     
  4. Alvis

    Alvis Member

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    Location:
    Free Rangin' The I-55 Corridor
    I stockplie ammunition
    I buy amps mainly to use OR as the OP said , maintain a level of proficiency,challenge myself ...
    Rarely do I buy ANYTHING to flip. If I do sell something it'll be to a friend who really likes a piece ,or to finance a bigger purchase.
    My big thing is, buying other people's trash . I have a fleet of less than collectible ,non working silverfaces that I rebuilt into a gang of hard working amps

    [​IMG]

    I think I pulled a couple Katrina Kasualties recently

    [​IMG]

    Got this one for 85 bucks .It works ,but Im gonna make it into somethin with some actual TONE

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Always keepin an eye out for a deal , I scored this castaway at GC for 50 bucks. Schematically , a tweed deluxe !!!

    [​IMG]

    As far as learning electronics , I started in high school . Unfortunately my teacher had a stroke midway thru the term ,so we never really got past DC power supplies

    But a few years later I became an electronics technician in the US Coast Guard . As luck would have it , my duty station after tech school was a radio transmitter station that ran 20 x 10kw tube radio transmitters . My job the next 3 year was their maintenance & repair....like workin on a giant guitar amp
    Of course I learned a lot just being on the internetS
     
  5. pb641

    pb641 Member

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    Yeah, definitely true that money is made at the buy, and I think that range has to be 400 to 700 max depending on the amp. BTW, real nice turnaround on that plexi, keeper for sure.
     
  6. pb641

    pb641 Member

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    If you're starting from scratch, you need a really good basic electronics book oriented towards tube circuits, (radio and amps), an assortment of small hand tools, a good multimeter ($15 to $25), decent 25 watt soldering iron and associated stuff, a donor starter project, and mainly patience.

    I have seen video courses on the internet that are sold by some of the outfits that put out amp kits, and that might be a good place to start. However, I have never actually reviewed them.
     
  7. pb641

    pb641 Member

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    That castaway and the 75 both look like perfect candidates for a full restore. I wanna see those when you're done.

    I also got my start in the military. I went through the Advanced Polaris Electronics program (pipeline schools for submarines), and then did maintenance on all kinds of equipment on the boat. After the Navy, I spent two years working on microwave relays and repeaters.
     
  8. rmconner80

    rmconner80 Cantankerous Luddite Silver Supporting Member

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    Always prepared to take a loss when selling an item. Sometimes I do, sometimes I don't. Yes, with the market down, it's tougher to move things and easier to take more of a loss. If I wasn't ok with that risk, I wouldn't buy or sell anything.
     
  9. midnightlaundry

    midnightlaundry Member

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    :D Quote of the day!
     

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