Voice and Electric guitar through a single amp? How?

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs' started by solarbean, Jun 4, 2008.

  1. solarbean

    solarbean Supporting Member

    Messages:
    130
    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2007
    Location:
    Littleton Mass
    I often do coffee-house type performances using an acoustic guitar, a shure sm-58 mic, and a 2-channel Ultrasound AG50 acoustic guitar amp. It does an awesome job on both vocals and instrument. I would like to bring out my electric guitar at some point, but only want to use a single amp for simplicity. I've got a Mesa Bogie F30 and a Swart AST. Both are single channel and certainly not geared up for amplifying voice.

    Is there an amp out there which solves this problem? Do I need 2 amps?
     
  2. dunara

    dunara Member

    Messages:
    1,902
    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2006
    Location:
    Scotland
    Nope - get yourself a POD and use it for your electric guitar tone into your acoustic amp. I actually know one pro who uses that setup routinely. If you still need to use your acoustic on some songs, set up an A-B box to switch between the acoustic and electric sources. This will keep the other channel free for your vocal mic. Hope this is some help. :)
     
  3. solarbean

    solarbean Supporting Member

    Messages:
    130
    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2007
    Location:
    Littleton Mass
    Thanks for the response. This sounds like a good strategy. There are several pod models... which are you suggesting?

    Any other ideas out there?
     
  4. Gtrman100

    Gtrman100 Member

    Messages:
    1,556
    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2008
    Location:
    So Cal
    Dunara is right- get a Pod X3L. It has guitar input, microphone input, 2 discrete channels so that you can have separate effects on guitar and vocals, vintage mic pre models, and btw, it sounds great!

    Also, you can lock the mic channel so that if you switch guitar patches, the mic effects stay the same. Get yourself a small PA, or powered monitor and you're all set.
     
  5. thedave

    thedave Member

    Messages:
    62
    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2004
    Location:
    CT
    I used to use an Acoustic Image Clarus II amp thru a Stealth ER (extended range) cabinet. Great for jazz tones and handled vocals quite well--the amp is has 2 channels and one is EQ'd for voice. Compact and light; It's somewhat directional, tho.

    Recently, I've been using the Bose L1 Model II system (with tonematch engine that's great for EQ and signal processing and one bass module) for vocals and 7-string guitar, and it works very well. I'm really sold on this sound solution.

    Best of luck!
     
  6. Flux

    Flux Member

    Messages:
    886
    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2007
    I guess that the main point here is that you don't want to use a guitar amp for vocals, so use an amp that sounds good on vocals and adjust for your guitar. My wife set me this task a while back and I ended up buying her a Behringer K900FX. It's a 3 channel, 90 watt keyboard amp with one XLR mic input, built-in FX and graphic EQ. I used a Fishman pre-amp on her acoustic for additional tone shaping and impedance matching, and damned if the whole thing doesn't sound really good. I've also tried it with electric guitar and various FX with acceptable results. The bonus: these amps are cheap - $199
    http://www.music123.com/Behringer-ULTRATONE-K900FX-Keyboard-Amp-PA-System-480785-i1171331.Music123
     
  7. solarbean

    solarbean Supporting Member

    Messages:
    130
    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2007
    Location:
    Littleton Mass
    I think I understand what I need to do now -

    1) Buy a modeler for the guitar (like the Pod) and use my acoustic amp (or buy another clean 2-channel amp)
    2) Use 2 amps - one for guitar and one for vocals.

    Thanks again for the responses, Guys.
     
  8. Wayne

    Wayne Member

    Messages:
    655
    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2003
    Location:
    Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, USA
    I use a Marshall Acoustic Soloist for this application. It has 4 inputs for piezos and magnetic pickups, mic input, and an auxilliary input. It's really a great grab-n-go for acoustic guitar and vocals.

    I've used it with my Hamer Duotone Custom guitar, which has regular magnetic pickups and piezos under the bridge. I can switch between or blend the acoustic and electric guitar sounds right on the guitar. Mind you, the electric sounds are very clean. Putting a modeller between this output and the magnetic input on the amp gives you the panoply of distortion tones, etc.
     

Share This Page