Wah or envelope filter?

Discussion in 'Effects, Pedals, Strings & Things' started by EagleDo, Mar 3, 2015.

  1. EagleDo

    EagleDo Member

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    Just curious as to why somebody might prefer one over the other.
     
  2. 62Tele

    62Tele Supporting Member

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    I have one of each and like them both. The auto wah gets you into wah territory without having to manipulate a pedal (simply reacting to your pick attack) while the wah allows you a little more expression and control over the effect. Of those I've used, I've found the auto wahs / filters typically quieter than most wah pedals. If you're singing, the auto wah can be a bit easier to use since it's less to coordinate.
     
  3. Lolaviola

    Lolaviola Member

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    Two. Completely. Different. Pedals.
     
  4. 62Tele

    62Tele Supporting Member

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    I agree. But there's so much overlap the way I use them they're essentialy interchangeable. I can certainly see how this could not be the case for a lot of people.
     
  5. ClassicLP

    ClassicLP Member

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    Similar pedals, like phase and flanger, yet have underlying differences. The average listener could careless but guitarists sweat the minutia.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  6. ERGExplorer

    ERGExplorer Member

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    An envelope follower is not limited to an auto-wah.

    There are envelope followers which affect modulation rate and/or depth, delay rate, application of a resonant filter, and so on. Yes, there are envelope filters which use a wah filter, but a lot of envelope filters do not.

    Assuming you mean comparing wah envelope filters with wah-wah pedals, the biggest difference is that one is foot-controlled and the the other dynamic-controlled. One person might like having a triggered envelope on each peak. Someone else might prefer a rhythmic envelope having nothing to do with the pick attacks.

    Also, given that some envelope filters sound nothing like a wah, one could prefer the sound of those filters to the wah sound. A lot of envelope filters have resonant filters, where a set of resonant frequencies make a hump (visible in an frequency analyzer) which moves up and down just a bit lower (in the case of a low-pass filter) than the frequency where the sound goes to zero. That's the second preference someone might have: single-vocal-formant-type filter like a wah, or resonant filter.

    So, two reasons to prefer one over the other: foot-controlled versus signal strength, and type of filter.
     
  7. EagleDo

    EagleDo Member

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    Can you name some?
     
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2015
  8. RockDebris

    RockDebris Member

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    A low pass filter or a high pass filter doesn't sound like a wah. I have those options in the Mobius and H9. Actually been using them a bit lately, programming some Muse and U2 presets for gigs. Can be used in a very subtle or very extreme way. A wah though, is always a pretty obvious effect because of the usually narrow Q.
     
  9. JackStraw12

    JackStraw12 Supporting Member

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    I've played both for years, going either for the funky wah sound or a JG esque filter tone and personally the filter just fits my playing better.
     
  10. RickK

    RickK Member

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    I've always liked having both. If I had to choose only one it would be a traditional wah - can't live without the control
     

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