Wah question

Discussion in 'Effects, Pedals, Strings & Things' started by Deuce007, Aug 29, 2008.

  1. Deuce007

    Deuce007 Member

    Messages:
    197
    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2007
    Location:
    Michigan
    Hi all, im starting to use pedals a bit now and have a question i hope you guys can help me with. i have a Budda wah and every time i kick it on the overall volume of my amps gets fairly loud like a lead boost.

    my pedal order is Pro Analog MK III-Pro Analog Power Driver- Buddah Wah - amp switcher.

    any ideas on how i can avoid the vol increase. also does the order im running the pedals in look ok to you.

    thanks
     
  2. Deuce007

    Deuce007 Member

    Messages:
    197
    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2007
    Location:
    Michigan
  3. fretbuzzed

    fretbuzzed Member

    Messages:
    364
    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2008
    Location:
    new hampshire
    Try the wah first then dirt, mod, dly ...
     
  4. The_Whale

    The_Whale Member

    Messages:
    5,975
    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2004
    Location:
    Gaithersburg, MD
    I'd try the wah first.

    Whas are equalizers of sorts (actually they are "un"-equalizers). As such they work by boosting frequencies. In your case the result is too much overall boost.

    You can try to turn the pot in the wah so it covers a different frequency range. Or maybe try a graphic eq after the wha, or a compressor.

    I think putting the wah first might help your problem too.
     
  5. StompBoxBlues

    StompBoxBlues Member

    Messages:
    18,619
    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2005
    Location:
    under the stars
    You can either adjust the wah by modding (there are mods on the net for the opposite, so instead of increasing the resistor, do the opposite..) it to have less gain. There is one resistor that determines the gain on Q1 that can be changed out for less volume.

    Also, (even better) you could buy a Foxrox Wah Retrofit which has a trimpot that allows you to adjust the level of output, but the main function is to let it run with a fuzz and it works really well!

    OR you could dial down your guitar volume at the same time as you turn on the wah.

    Last option I can think of...wah in it's own loop with some pedal after that has volume adjust...like maybe an EQ pedal?
     
  6. Deuce007

    Deuce007 Member

    Messages:
    197
    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2007
    Location:
    Michigan
    Thanks guys I'm somewhat new to the multiple whole pedal thing, i didn't have it first because i thought i read here somewhere here that fuzzes should always go first in the chain.
     
  7. The_Whale

    The_Whale Member

    Messages:
    5,975
    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2004
    Location:
    Gaithersburg, MD
    I just thought of something I meant to put in other post...

    In my experience, even identical models of wahs sound different. You can take three Budda wahs and each one will sound pretty different, especially once you get it home and try it out on your rig.

    I can't think of any other effect that has as much variation like this as wahs do.

    Maybe newer wahs have more consistancy, but the older Crybaby types that I'm familure with are like this.

    If the budda you bought isn't working for you, maybe you can exchange it for another one or return it and try a different wah.
     
  8. StompBoxBlues

    StompBoxBlues Member

    Messages:
    18,619
    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2005
    Location:
    under the stars

    Good point. For me, I think wahs and fuzzes would fit that category.

    I have just been modding my wah, it's alot of fun, but in researching I found an excellent site devoted to wahs and wah theory, what makes it tick.
    http://geofex.com/Article_Folders/wahpedl/wahped.htm

    I have a two-year degree in electronics, so I could follow it (and was pretty impressed with this persons' ability to analyze the circuit) but I am not sure how much of it is easily read by someone not into electronics....but mainly he points out that a wah is a pretty incredible piece of work. Because using a fixed inductor and a fixed capacitor, and a POT (variable resistance) it is actually acting like a tuner filter. He points out that the way it works makes the cap to seem to be adjustable, relative the LC, or inductor/capacitor and moves the bandpass hump up and down.

    I guess what I am getting at, different values of components would make possibly significant changes even with the same circuit, and the gain of the transistor may come into play as well. Same is true of fuzzes, but more because the minimal components of most fuzzes and the transistor variances mean that each part takes on even more significance....there is no balancing out, if a resistor in one is within it's range but at the top of the 10% and one is on the bottom of the 10% +- rating, if the value is big enough that could be a big deal.

    Most other pedals use op-amps instead of transistors, and have a good deal more components, and are set up so they kind of even out...one component out of range might not make as big a difference.

    At least, that's how I think of it. In any case, that article is pretty amazing, good stuff!
     
  9. The_Whale

    The_Whale Member

    Messages:
    5,975
    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2004
    Location:
    Gaithersburg, MD
    neat article

    I have always noticed some variation in sound between different samples of the same pedal; the Boss CE-2 comes to mind. And it isn't just me. Check the reviews in HC. The same circuit can produce a lot of different sounding pedals. I don't think the average pedal geek understands this.

    But I always noticed wahs really sounded a lot different pedal-to-pedal.

    I've been through maybe four crybabies since I started playing and I've replaced pots and switches on them. I know them (and their many sources of noise) pretty well. And I know after replacing the pot the wah always sounds at least a little different.

    I don't have much experience with different samples of the same model fuzz, so I can't say they vary as much as wahs.

    I hadn't given much though of the reason for so much variation between pedals, but your's does make sense; less parts leads to more variation. And pedals with capacitors, transistors and resistors are going to vary more than modern type pedals with op amps.
     
  10. Deuce007

    Deuce007 Member

    Messages:
    197
    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2007
    Location:
    Michigan
    Guys thanks again for chiming in, i went with the Foxrox retro fit and i must say it took care of the problem and sounds great as well.
     
  11. StompBoxBlues

    StompBoxBlues Member

    Messages:
    18,619
    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2005
    Location:
    under the stars
    Great! Glad to hear it. It's nice to hear back on these threads what the conclusion was, thanks for remembering to update it!
     
  12. The_Whale

    The_Whale Member

    Messages:
    5,975
    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2004
    Location:
    Gaithersburg, MD
    and an interesting and satisfying conclusion it is......

    that Foxrox thing seems like a good product.
     

Share This Page