Vendor Wall-O-Guitars and a recording tip.

York Audio

Vendor
Messages
646
Well it's been what, three months of being quarantined and the state of the world is a lot to handle right now. The truth is, I needed to let out some steam to maintain some sanity, and what better way to do that than to play something aggressive?

I already know this kind of music isn't everyone's cup o' tea, but sometimes it feels good to layer big distorted guitars and turn it up way too loud. It's good for the soul. And after seeing an old Foo Fighters video pop up on my instagram, it had to be done.

For this track, I tried something I've never done before. I used modelers and real amps together using my Axe-Fx III and my mid 90's Mesa Dual Caliber DC-5 head through the Fractal X-Load, and used MixIR2 as the IR loader. Here comes the recording tip... I started each guitar part with a sound I liked, and it sounded good... but after recording the direct signals from the real amp and my Axe-Fx, it was possible to change mic placements after the fact. It made it really easy to listen to the track and choose IR files that suited the mix. One file would make guitars more forward, another would make them sit a little further back, and the nice thing was just being able to listen and try stuff rather than recording a part 5 times with 5 different mic placements or trying to EQ things to sit a certain way.

All that to say, if you're using modelers or real amps to record, try using the direct amp signals and play with your IR choices in the context of the whole mix. It's amazing how your mic placement can change the character of the whole song and you end up EQ'ing less.

Anyway, here it is.




Drums: Slate SSD5 Blackbird Pack
Bass: Fender Jazz, Axe-Fx III SV Bass 1, YA AMPG 410 HS IR
Clean Guitar: 2013 Gibson SG Standard, Axe-Fx III Brit JM45, YA MRSH M25 IR
Dirty Guitar R: 1997 Gibson Les Paul Classic, Mesa DC-5, Fractal X-Load, YA MRSH M25 IR
Dirty Guitar L: 1997 Gibson Les Paul Classic, Axe-Fx III SLO Lead, YA MRSH M25 IR
Dirty Guitar Lead: 1997 Gibson Les Paul Classic, Axe-Fx III SLO Lead, YA MRSH M25 IR
 

JiveTurkey

Trumpets and Tants
Silver Supporting Member
Messages
25,559
Sounds great. I've always wanted to try one of those DC-5's :drink
 

bdrepko

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
2,967
Well it's been what, three months of being quarantined and the state of the world is a lot to handle right now. The truth is, I needed to let out some steam to maintain some sanity, and what better way to do that than to play something aggressive?

I already know this kind of music isn't everyone's cup o' tea, but sometimes it feels good to layer big distorted guitars and turn it up way too loud. It's good for the soul. And after seeing an old Foo Fighters video pop up on my instagram, it had to be done.

For this track, I tried something I've never done before. I used modelers and real amps together using my Axe-Fx III and my mid 90's Mesa Dual Caliber DC-5 head through the Fractal X-Load, and used MixIR2 as the IR loader. Here comes the recording tip... I started each guitar part with a sound I liked, and it sounded good... but after recording the direct signals from the real amp and my Axe-Fx, it was possible to change mic placements after the fact. It made it really easy to listen to the track and choose IR files that suited the mix. One file would make guitars more forward, another would make them sit a little further back, and the nice thing was just being able to listen and try stuff rather than recording a part 5 times with 5 different mic placements or trying to EQ things to sit a certain way.

All that to say, if you're using modelers or real amps to record, try using the direct amp signals and play with your IR choices in the context of the whole mix. It's amazing how your mic placement can change the character of the whole song and you end up EQ'ing less.

Anyway, here it is.




Drums: Slate SSD5 Blackbird Pack
Bass: Fender Jazz, Axe-Fx III SV Bass 1, YA AMPG 410 HS IR
Clean Guitar: 2013 Gibson SG Standard, Axe-Fx III Brit JM45, YA MRSH M25 IR
Dirty Guitar R: 1997 Gibson Les Paul Classic, Mesa DC-5, Fractal X-Load, YA MRSH M25 IR
Dirty Guitar L: 1997 Gibson Les Paul Classic, Axe-Fx III SLO Lead, YA MRSH M25 IR
Dirty Guitar Lead: 1997 Gibson Les Paul Classic, Axe-Fx III SLO Lead, YA MRSH M25 IR

Sweet! Sounded great.
 

York Audio

Vendor
Messages
646
Sounds great. I've always wanted to try one of those DC-5's :drink
They’ve gotta be the most underrated amps in the Mesa line. I have a really early Rev A combo and a Rev B head. They’re incredibly versatile and fairly cheap on the used market if you can find one, but they’re going up in value.

If you see one in the wild, it’s worth checking out.


I hear a lot of Paramour vibe in there. I like it!
HAHAHA! We can’t change where we come from. :)
 

Fireproof

Nobody's fault but mine
Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
4,535
Wow - that was really great. Love the tones. Could’ve been MORE aggressive, though. LOL.

Nice selection of guitars. I’m a Gibby fan myself.
 

Dogman

Member
Messages
64
Cool piece of music! And I concur: layering big distorted guitars is a thing of beauty.
While I'm a big believer in creating precedents early in the production process, thusly avoiding option paralysis when it's time to mix, I will try your idea of deceiding on the most suitable IR very late in the game when a fitting project comes along.
 

York Audio

Vendor
Messages
646
Wow - that was really great. Love the tones. Could’ve been MORE aggressive, though. LOL.

Nice selection of guitars. I’m a Gibby fan myself.
Things could ALWAYS be more aggressive, right? And yeah, that '97 Les Paul Classic has been my #1 since I was 16. The 2013 SG Standard is pretty special too. You should look them up... there's a big following for that particular year. I "believe" Gibson basically took their remaining '61 reissue guitars and labeled them as Standards. Same body, neck profile, and maybe even the pickups. I don't remember the differences, but it's a cool guitar.

Sounds great. Get Hayley to lay some vocals down and you’ve got a hit.
I'll tell her to get her orange hair dye ready. :)

Cool piece of music! And I concur: layering big distorted guitars is a thing of beauty.
While I'm a big believer in creating precedents early in the production process, thusly avoiding option paralysis when it's time to mix, I will try your idea of deceiding on the most suitable IR very late in the game when a fitting project comes along.
It was kind of a happy accident. I had tones that sounded great in the mix, but the DC-5 had a little too much bite when I turned everything up. It's a very different amp compared to the SLO, so it makes sense that it would need different treatment. So instead of trying to EQ it, I just looped the chorus and loaded different IRs while it played until one felt right. I kept all of the other tones as they were, but that "one" that needed some help was as simple as choosing a different mic placement.

You don't HAVE to swap IRs, but it's cool knowing that you CAN if you ever need to. If the mix sounds great, no need to mess with anything.
 

Jarick

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
10,099
I dunno it didn’t sound as good as the clip of the guy demoing his Bugera in his garage

seriously though nice stuff. How did you get the drum track (like the midi grooves or whatever)? Is that part of SSD? As someone who grew up playing drums for hours a day I can’t figure out how to get a good groove from a computer (and unfortunately don’t have room for an e kit to trigger).
 

Fireproof

Nobody's fault but mine
Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
4,535
Things could ALWAYS be more aggressive, right? And yeah, that '97 Les Paul Classic has been my #1 since I was 16. The 2013 SG Standard is pretty special too. You should look them up... there's a big following for that particular year. I "believe" Gibson basically took their remaining '61 reissue guitars and labeled them as Standards. Same body, neck profile, and maybe even the pickups. I don't remember the differences, but it's a cool guitar.

Yes, heavy is great. But honestly I like all styles.

That’s awesome about the guitars. I’ll have to look into the 2013 SGs! My SG is a 2017 Standard T. Supposed to have some “traditional” features that harken back tot he 60’s. I’ll have to look into both a bit deeper. Thanks!
 

York Audio

Vendor
Messages
646
I dunno it didn’t sound as good as the clip of the guy demoing his Bugera in his garage

seriously though nice stuff. How did you get the drum track (like the midi grooves or whatever)? Is that part of SSD? As someone who grew up playing drums for hours a day I can’t figure out how to get a good groove from a computer (and unfortunately don’t have room for an e kit to trigger).

I just use a MIDI keyboard to play the beat as close as I can (and obviously hit a bunch of wrong triggers by accident). Then just clean up the wrong hits, tweak fills, adjust velocities that need it, and that's pretty much it. I need to find a new drum program that sounds more natural though.
 
Messages
1,075
I dunno it didn’t sound as good as the clip of the guy demoing his Bugera in his garage

How did you get the drum track (like the midi grooves or whatever)? Is that part of SSD? As someone who grew up playing drums for hours a day I can’t figure out how to get a good groove from a computer (and unfortunately don’t have room for an e kit to trigger).

Superior Drummer is the most realistic and user friendly drum program I've ever run across.

Not only do the samples sound realistic as heck, but there are a lot of parameters you can adjust to enhance randomization of hits and velocity to sound a lot more like a real live drummer than a program.

Also, with most drum sample packs you get a pretty large library of midi grooves, and you can buy just the addon groove packs separately pretty econimically.

As far as finding the groove you want. you can simply tap in your main beat with the mouse and the library will filter down to grooves that match, and then use the built in intelligence to find complementary parts for intros, fills, bridges, chorus, etc.

Ryan did a great video showing how he uses all of these features to go from nothing to a finished track that sounds uber realistic in a very short amount of time with pretty limited effort.



Cheers
TRJB
 

Jarick

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
10,099
Superior Drummer is the most realistic and user friendly drum program I've ever run across.

Not only do the samples sound realistic as heck, but there are a lot of parameters you can adjust to enhance randomization of hits and velocity to sound a lot more like a real live drummer than a program.

Also, with most drum sample packs you get a pretty large library of midi grooves, and you can buy just the addon groove packs separately pretty econimically.

As far as finding the groove you want. you can simply tap in your main beat with the mouse and the library will filter down to grooves that match, and then use the built in intelligence to find complementary parts for intros, fills, bridges, chorus, etc.

Ryan did a great video showing how he uses all of these features to go from nothing to a finished track that sounds uber realistic in a very short amount of time with pretty limited effort.



Cheers
TRJB


That's good stuff!

I picked up EZ Drummer a couple years ago but haven't done anything with it. I was starting to go down the path of trying to draw out beats and it was tedious and unrealistic (no dynamic variation). Then I started looking up midi triggers but kind of forgot about it. Actually getting a little midi keyboard and just playing out the beats would probably be the easiest way to do it I think!
 

York Audio

Vendor
Messages
646
I’ve heard great things about Superior Drummer. I like the idea of the groove function that plays around the beat you’ve already programmed. That’s a very cool feature I didn’t know it had. Might pick that one up soon. Thanks for the tips, guys!
 
Messages
1,075
That's good stuff!

I picked up EZ Drummer a couple years ago but haven't done anything with it. I was starting to go down the path of trying to draw out beats and it was tedious and unrealistic (no dynamic variation). Then I started looking up midi triggers but kind of forgot about it. Actually getting a little midi keyboard and just playing out the beats would probably be the easiest way to do it I think!
EZ Drummer, being the little brother to SD has most of the same functionality as SD3 does. Tap your beat, easy groove editing (change number of hits, simple velocity editing, randomization, etc), and also the same 'song creator' that will find matching groove parts to the main one you selected. If you are mostly puttering around for fun, it's more than enough at a much lower cost point than SD3, and also a lot less taxing on the harddrive (IE a few GB drive space vs a few hundred GB).

Cheers
TRJB
 




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