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Want to bevel my frets...................

Discussion in 'Luthier's Guitar & Bass Technical Discussion' started by major-minor, Jan 8, 2008.

  1. major-minor

    major-minor Supporting Member

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    What's the best (most safe) way to do this and end up with a nice polished feel?

    Never tried this before........filing and smoothing out. Maybe wiser to take it to a good tech?

    Any advice appreciated.
     
  2. David Collins

    David Collins Member

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    Wiser to take it to a good tech, in my opinion. The feel of the end of the frets has less to do with the angle or polish of the bevel, then it does the shaping and rounding of the ends. It's also one of the things that I see messed up most often by over beveling the ends and/or rolling off the top too much at the ends in shaping or polishing. When people complain about things like their high E slipping off the board, this is usually the culprit.
     
  3. Rosewood

    Rosewood Member

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    Also you can't undo a fret mistake without a complete refret.
     
  4. major-minor

    major-minor Supporting Member

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    Good advice guys. Thanks.

    Actually, I could get used to it the way it is. What I'm doing is comparing my strat to my Anderson. The Andy has such a smooth feel where as the strat feels alittle rougher as I slide my hand up and down the neck. The Andy's frets are just smoother and rounder------while the strat's are more squared off.

    It's certainly playable as it is---------just seeing if I could get closer to the Anderson.
     
  5. khromo231

    khromo231 Guest

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    Get some garage sale beaters and some "dressing sticks" from StewMac, if you are seriously interested in doing it yourself. Using finer grits on the dressing sticks prevents them from cutting too fast, and makes major damage less likely. It takes time and patience, but these things will do the job nicely. I need a magnifying visor as well. The big discount tool shops have these in stock for very cheap prices. After a beater or two, you will get the idea. Break/round the edges, without changing the geometry more than you have to.
     

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