Warmoth strat or US '62 Reissue

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by EXP, May 13, 2006.

  1. EXP

    EXP Supporting Member

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    i want a fiesta red strat, and considered ordering a warmoth strat body. my concerns are that they dont hold their resale value and i might get dead wood or a ''dud''. the upside is i can get it customized to my specs, but im hearing mixed reviews, apparently theres no guarantee youll get a good piece of wood? i have some WCR SRs i was going to pop in there, also would put a Callaham vintage trem/block on but that would be pointless if i get a dud. not a risk im willing to take, so i opted for a used USA or AV '62 reissue in
    fiesta red.

    which route would be the wiser choice?
     
  2. Pete Galati

    Pete Galati Member

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    If resale value is a big concern, you should probably steer clear of putting together a parts guitar. It always ends up costing me more to put one together anyhow, than if I just bought one at a music store.

    And then there's that element of luck. And sometimes you need to change things until you have a guitar that works the way you want.

    IMO, if you have any second thoughts about putting together a parts guitar, then don't.

    Pete
     
  3. VaughnC

    VaughnC Supporting Member

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    While building a Strat can be an interesting experience, you just never know what you're tonally going to end up with....but you might get lucky. Personally, I'd run the racks until the right Strat found me. I think you have a better chance of finding one with the best fit that way. However, if you're not too fussy about finding a particular Strat sound and/or feel, building one can be a lot of fun. But, if you spend about $1K on parts and end up with a tonal dog, that would be a bummer.
     
  4. TwoGeez

    TwoGeez Member

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    Warmoth, USA Custom, etc. are becoming very popular as more and more people put together their own guitars. Typically each of these builders are known to have quality parts and skill so the resale value is pretty good especially if you're putting quality components on the piece (i.e., pups, bridge, etc.). I wouldn't worry to much about resale value if you decide to do it yourself. I've seen builds sell on this site for really good prices, especially newer pieces, so long as the condition was good. I would encourage you to try and build your own piece, there's a certain joy about putting together your own guitar, and as long as you follow the specs of a certain model you're aiming for, it will turn out ok.
     
  5. TwoGeez

    TwoGeez Member

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    Also remember that a lot of vintage (early) Strats were made with really narly pieces of wood back in the day, and cut with ancient equipment, yet these guitars are the most revered in the world. Go figure. Also, guitars are like red wine, they get better with age.
     
  6. Pete Galati

    Pete Galati Member

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    Ok. I agree. If you're going to sell a parts guitar, part it out. You'll get more of your money back, if not all of it.

    And besides, Fender's interns are likely to spot your auction, and have it shut down anyhow if you try to auction a parts guitar complete.

    Pete
     
  7. moozak

    moozak Silver Supporting Member

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    that's not AT ALL true... warmoth pays fender for a licensing agreement... that's how they are able to sell parts that look exactly like fender. so selling a fully functional warmoth guitar on ebay that looks exactly like a strat is totally legal.

    the problem with fender's legal department comes into play when people infringe upon fender's trademark by putting a "fender" sticker on the headstock... or try to sell a parts-o-caster with the claim that it's a fender.
     
  8. HeeBGB

    HeeBGB Member

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    I have a Warmoth strat. I bought raw parts from the showcase and sent them to Lay's Guitar in Ohio for Nitro finish and mild relicing. That was over two years ago. I can honestly say that I would not hesitate to do it again. I am VERY happy with the results. The ONLY complaint I have is nothing about Warmoth but the fact that I didn't choose a fatter neck profile. I could purchase a fatter neck but the guitar is so good the way it is.

    If resale is important to you I would not go Warmoth or new guitar (Unless you're going very high end like a Lentz or something). I'd look for a used Fender. That way if you don't like it the resale will be what you paid for it....maybe even a few bucks more!
     
  9. Mark Robinson

    Mark Robinson Member

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    To my point of view there are only a few reasons you might consider a parts guitar.

    1. It is fun and is a learning experience.

    2. You can include exactly the features you desire, without a custom builder or custom shop price tag.

    3. It can be difficult to "run the racks" if you live away from a metropolis with many guitar stores. And buying over the internet is every bit as much a crapshoot as building a guitar IMHO.

    The downsides are there.
    Resale as an assembly is going to be poor.
    Re-sale as parts is cumbersome and takes time.
    If you are not of a certain temperment and skill level, finish quality and ensuring a professional playablility level are not guaranteed.

    Having a pro, finish a parts guitar, will likely make that instrument as expensive as many original Fenders of various types.

    The Japanese and Mexican Fenders can be amazing instruments, and are on a par price-wise, with a loaded Parts axe.

    A decent alternative is to take one of the Japanese or Mexican guitars and "accessorize" it, with pickups, bridge, tuners, frets, etc.

    The fun factor is the reason I've got a few home finished Warmoth guitars.
     
  10. clothwiring

    clothwiring Supporting Member

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    I would say go to USACG to get the neck and body. I built my tele and it's aging nicely and the lacquer is drying and the guitar toning out already (more because the nitro is curing I believe). Anyway it's becoming one of my favorite guitars to play and it cost me about $1,200 including about $200 of mistakes. I could do it again for a bit cheaper now though. It's all nitro neck and body and has Kinman AVN60's in it, I couldn't be happier (other than next time to get a bigger neck on 'er).

    If you want resale, buy the Fender though.
     

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