Waterborne Polyurethane

Discussion in 'The Small Company Luthiers' started by J.H., Jan 26, 2012.

  1. J.H.

    J.H. Member

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    I've never used a waterborne poly. Is anyone using this on their guitars? How do you like it? I just got going on a new guitar that I'm building for myself. It's solid mahogany. I'm trying to decide what finish to use. [​IMG]
     
  2. Sweetwood

    Sweetwood Member

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    I don't know for certain, but I have a sneaking suspicion that PRS V process is water based. I've used it. Like anything, you have to learn it.
     
  3. walterw

    walterw Gold Supporting Member

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    never mind that, what is that amp?!
     
  4. J.H.

    J.H. Member

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    I've heard that major manufacturers are using such products. I was hoping to find someone with first hand experince

    That's a '66 BFSR. It was so far from original when I picked it up that I decided to reincarnate it as a twin. I built the cabinet for it a couple years ago.
    [​IMG][​IMG]
     
  5. billyreal

    billyreal Member

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    Ive always used it and love it,its tough,the feel is good and it wont kill ya

    Bill Harden
    Harden Engineering
     
  6. Malinoski

    Malinoski everything wrong possible

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    I'm with Bill, waterborne is the way to go- tough as nails and won't kill you.
    I've been using an waterborne acrylic lacquer for 30 years, essentially the same thing without the polyurethane in it.
    Unless you are already trained with solvent based paints you won't know the difference.

    Honestly tho, natural mahogany... no color?
    Oil it.
     
  7. J.H.

    J.H. Member

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    Thanks

    I might stain it. I might bleach it, just haven't decided yet.
    I thought about organic. What product would you recommend?
     
  8. burningyen

    burningyen Vendor

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    Bill Scheltema of Canadian Breed is using Target's water-based stuff.
     
  9. Malinoski

    Malinoski everything wrong possible

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    Target has a good reputation, Hydrocote is my preference.

    Stain is good, bleach is bad- besides being horribly toxic, it's a waste of perfectly pretty wood.

    For oils you want something that has some poly in it like Danish Oil or Tru Oil (which are about the samething- a linseed and poly blend), or polymerized Tung oil. Stay away from raw oils like pure Tung, you need the poly in there to harden it up, otherwise it takes forever to dry and never really hardens.
     
  10. hoochiecoochie

    hoochiecoochie Member

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    I believe most water based polys will stay clear and not yellow like solvent based polys IF that makes a difference. Also, if you utilize a clear sealer, it will enhance the graining of the wood and not change its color perse. Maybe someone else with more experience can chime in on this.
     
  11. billyreal

    billyreal Member

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    I like a stain ,then a mix of 1/2 tung 1/2 thinner, it pops the grain and will dry overnight.
    Pete love your guitars btw
     
  12. dougk

    dougk Silver Supporting Member

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  13. Sweetwood

    Sweetwood Member

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    Someone I talked to at NAMM is using water poly...totally forgot. I might start spraying wb Lacquer for my ukes.
     
  14. scott

    scott Member

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    I read that thread at MLP and I had the same problems as Doug had with that sealer. I gave up eventually. Nothing bursts like nitro as far as I can tell. I also did some guitars about 15 years ago with water based lacquer and had the blue haze problem. I'm still working on WB lacquers but it hasn't replaced nitro yet.....for me anyway.
     
  15. Neill

    Neill Member

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    i've used it on furniture. it doesn't "lay" down when building up the finish like oil based stuff, and doesn't seem to absorb as well either, but it dries fast and there aren't too many finishes that would be more durable. ime with furniture, if i were ever to build a guitar i would use a tung oil or danish oil. in fact when time isn't an issue i use tung oil on any furniture i make. it is whisper thin, penetrating, easy to repair and easy to apply. it's only downside as far as i see is that it takes MANY coats to build a finish.
     
  16. J.H.

    J.H. Member

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    Thanks for the replies everyone, and thank you Doug for the link. It's very cool of you to share your experience, and first hand knowledge of the product. It'll take me a while to read through it all. I've already read the first few pages, and also visited the Target Coatings website. It's nice that the products are available in sizes as small as a quart. I'll try to digest the thread on MLP before I ask any more questions here. I need to figure out what I'll do soon. It wont be long before I'm ready.
     

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