webbed joists in basement of house

Discussion in 'The Pub' started by neastguy, Feb 12, 2015.

  1. neastguy

    neastguy Supporting Member

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    I think that is what they are called... first house I've seen with them and of course this is the house that the wife loves..9wont have anywhere to attache my pullup bar :( any insight on if it can be an issue.. the house is a 2004.. thanks
     
  2. axelfoley

    axelfoley Supporting Member

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    Trusses. They are fine but they can limit attic space.
     
  3. neastguy

    neastguy Supporting Member

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    these are in the basement supporting the floor... instead of solid wood they are in a web design
    [​IMG]
     
  4. auger-1

    auger-1 Member

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    lumber on flat floor trusses...4x2
    made at a truss shop....they should have engineered drawings for these
     
  5. Bo Faulkner

    Bo Faulkner Member

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    Open web floor trusses. As long as they are engineered right should be fine! How to tell u ask? Climb a step ladder and sight down them and see how much they are sagged. a little bit is normal
     
  6. '58Bassman

    '58Bassman Member

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    Why can't you attach the pullup bar? How does it attach? If you need a face to attach the bar, screw a piece of 1/2" plywood to the sides you want to use, the height of the joist, 4' long. Use #12 screws, 2" long with a fender washer on each. The load (you- nothing personal) would be distributed over 4' of each joist, so your weight should cause little flex in the joist. If you want to minimize the effect on the joist and you have an I-beam with the joists resting on it, install the plywood close to the beam- centering a load at the center of the span will maximize the deflection (sag) but the design load for a floor is calculated as dead load + live load and I doubt that you're heavy enough to be a problem. Dead load with 2x and typical sub floor and flooring used to be 20 lb/square foot and IIRC, live load is about 45 lb/sq ft. Since any load applied to a floor is shared by a larger area, you don't need to worry.
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2015
  7. lefort_1

    lefort_1 Nuzzled Firmly Betwixt Gold Supporting Member

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    I'm guessing the width of the attachment flange is wider than the exposed edge of the 2x4 or 2x6.

    If that's the case, you might consider sheathing a part of the joist in HEAVY plywood (3/4 inch) and bolting to that. Whatever you add, make sure it increases the overall strength of the joist....think about gluing the sheath on, rather than nailing/screwing (as nails can lead to cracks if they spread the grain too much).
     
  8. Muzzy

    Muzzy Supporting Member

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    Floor trusses are much stronger than joist. You can put up 20 pullup bars if want to. Don't worry about it.
     
  9. Madison

    Madison Supporting Member

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    I have I-Joists over my garage, with a room above. They are used when having to accomplish a long distance w/o a bearing wall. They are strong nothing to worry about.
     
  10. Mindcore

    Mindcore Member

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    Totally, Trusses are far stronger then solid 2X8's which tend to warp over time.
     
  11. MVrider

    MVrider Member

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    Not only do they use "less wood" but the (ply)wood they use is much cheaper than solid pine or Doug Fir 2x lumber. That's the primary reason why they are used in placed of conventional. But they've been around for years so no problem. The issue some day might be delamination of the plies due to disintegration/deterioration of the adhesives. But that's waaaay down the road.
     
  12. Fishyfishfish

    Fishyfishfish Member

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    Unless they are at max span length with a waterbed and a weight set above on the second floor. Most if not all tract/custom tract were built on the minimum end of the scale for maximum profit.
     
  13. Madison

    Madison Supporting Member

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    Well yes, a water bed would not be a good idea in the middle of a room with no bearing wall below. Do people still use those?:crazy
     
  14. neastguy

    neastguy Supporting Member

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    ok everyone.. thanks for the info.. I shalt not worry about them and I will figure out a way to mount the pull up bar
     
  15. MVrider

    MVrider Member

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    Just use two lengths of threaded pipe and a coupling
     
  16. mango

    mango Member

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    I love my waterbed.

    A waterbed typically puts less load per square foot than a refrigerator.
    I've slept on one for over 30 years,it's been in 2 apartments and 3 houses.
    Don't think there was ever a bearing wall below it,never had a problem.
     
  17. Madison

    Madison Supporting Member

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    You're probably right. It's just when you think of how heavy they are they give one pause. The weight is spread out over 30 SF or so which is good. I used to be a framing carpenter and if it's done right, can withstand considerable weight.
     

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