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weight-relief vs solid-body

nohaybanda

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
188
I would like to know if there is an audible difference between a weight-relieved guitar (9 holes, modern or ultra-modern) and a solid-body guitar. chambered guitars don't interest me.
 
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Aardvark

Gold Supporting Member
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2,025
9 holes maybe not. Anything more, and I notice a bit of loss of midrange. Mainly the high E sounds a bit delicate to me. Of course, that may be good or bad, depending on your amp, how you play, your needs, etc
 

DonP

Member
Messages
3,297
I would like to know if there is an audible difference between a weight-relieved guitar (9 holes, modern or ultra-modern) and a solid-body guitar. chambered guitars don't interest me.
9 holes have been in effect since 1984. How many recording have sounded messed up because of the weight relief?
 

LCW

Member
Messages
1,147
I have a LP Studio with the ultra modern weight relief. Have a LP Standard with no weight relief. There’s a difference in feel. It’s subtle. You can feel the body vibrate more on the solid. I can’t comment on sound difference as they have different pickups. They are about 0.9-1 lb difference also.
 

DGDGBD

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
7,410
Sorry, no one can say with any certainty unless you play the same exact guitar without, and then with, weight relief holes/cavities, which is impossible given the glued on maple cap. IOW, no.
 

Tommy Biggs

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
6,726
I’m not all that picky, but I never noticed any difference between my Swiss cheese LP and my old LP Custom (which now belongs to my brother).
They both have maple necks with ebony boards, and I’ve played them a lot through the same amps.
ymmv.
 

cap10kirk

Member
Messages
9,128
I have a LP Studio with the ultra modern weight relief. Have a LP Standard with no weight relief. There’s a difference in feel. It’s subtle. You can feel the body vibrate more on the solid. I can’t comment on sound difference as they have different pickups. They are about 0.9-1 lb difference also.

You can also easily have all those same differences between two Les Pauls with the same weight relief (or none at all). I've experienced that with the Les Pauls I've owned.
 
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C-4

Member
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14,526
I would like to know if there is an audible difference between a weight-relieved guitar (9 holes, modern or ultra-modern) and a solid-body guitar. chambered guitars don't interest me.


I have been playing for over 64 years and on a lot, A LOT of Gibsons. I could never hear the difference. The holes are for weight relief, not acoustic value.

I'm not saying no one can hear the difference, but I cannot. :)
ymmv
 

Dantana2

Senior Member
Messages
601
I played a standard and a traditional in 11 before I settled on the Traditional. I couldn't tell. The pickups we're different and the standard chambered. A solid?
The Traditional's are solid now but they also use a lighter dryer mahogany from Africa vs Honduras. They didn't have to lose any weight. IMHO it makes no difference. The old growth wood from the original 50's LP's was incredibly heavy. If you have ever played a fifties goldtop,I can assure you after about one song you will be ready to put it in the museum and break out the new chambered LP. To protect your investment and your back. Not because it sounds any better. Close though. I heard you about the chambered guitars. I think it's a good thing but I sit when I play now and keep the ben-gay nearby.
 

jvin248

Member
Messages
6,579
.

You'll have more tone change putting new strings on.

If you are considering buying a lighter weight guitar to replace a boat anchor you currently own, then the key differences you want to test/measure: Pickups, Pots, and Caps. You know how Pots effect tone 250k vs 500kohm, same thing happens and matters when you compare guitars because a single pot has a 20% tolerance range min to max. Don't forget pickup heights, bass/treble tip, and screw pole adjustments can really push the tone around too.

Everything else about the wood, finish thicknesses/types, and more are due to Marketing gobledegook trying to sell you something via hypnosis. Sure, you can believe them, but you'll pay a lot more.

.
 

ShredX81

Member
Messages
8
I’ve owned a few of both. I think typically the weight relieved guitars have been more resonant acoustically, but this has been both a good and bad thing in my experience.
I had a TA hollow drop top that, while being absolutely exceptional in its build quality, was too resonant for the trem springs. Almost as though there wasn’t enough wood mass around the string system. My suhr standard is chambered and it’s perfect. Lively and resonant. It’s noticeably a great mass guitar also.
Conversely, I had a solid body PRS, thick mahogany body, thick maple cap and even a RW neck and it didn’t really resonate acoustically at all and gave little feedback for me. So I found it to be less musical and less inspiring. Only that particular guitar though.
So I think it changes drastically from guitar to guitar. Kinda makes tone hunting fun of course, trying out guitars and seeing which works for the player.
 

fiveightandten

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
5,402
Every guitar sounds different. You’d need a huge sample size with many factors accounted for to think about making meaningful statements.

Personally, the only definitive thing I can say is that I can hear the sound of a chambered LP. But other types of weight relief? I wouldn’t claim to, reliably.
 

JasonE

Member
Messages
557
I hear a difference. To me the difference is in the top end and the bloom of the notes. This isn't necessarily a bad thing. I played a Les Paul once that sounded exactly how I wanted the one I owned to sound. I ended up buying it. Afterwards I found out that the one I had just bought was chambered. It had a nice attack and bloom on the notes. My other Les Paul had a solid body with no weight relief. It had much more bite on the top end and the bloom of the notes was much more sharp. Again, not necessarily bad. I think both have their place.

I ended up selling both guitars eventually and upgraded to other Les Pauls that I like better. I had a little trouble selling the chambered Les Paul. Some high gain players told me that they were way too much trouble with unwanted feedback. I never had that problem with the guitar. To me they are just different tools for different tones.
 




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