Weird stain on Fender headstock and how it got there.

Messages
11
Hey everyone,

I was wondering if anybody has any experience with the same thing. The stain wasn't there when I bought it, and I always kept it far from any liquid that might harm the finish. I don't often rub or clean that spot, given the fact that it's under the strings.
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buddyboy69

Member
Messages
4,999
My concern is the sort of circular spot in the middle of the headstock. :) It looks like a water stain, but I knew it couldn't happen on a gloss finished headstock.
Ayup, and you can see where that grain line comes out again where the truss rod plug is. The same grain, it's not a stain.
 

theon

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
936
The beauty of Mother Nature!
I think it adds some character to the headstock. Would you mind sharing a photo of the whole guitar?
 

great-case.com

a.k.a. "Mitch"
Messages
5,748
Aging of the top coat is typically a uniform yellowing that can exaggerate grain differentials. It's an added amber tone to the original look. I agree with those who suggest you're seeing is a natural evolution of the finish. New thoughts: Unless you've owned this guitar for awhile, it seems rather rapid to me. Assuming you could not see this grain differential as recently as five years ago, I'd say it's too fast. If this is 15 years of change... then it's in line.

My Advice: Humbly offered and noted as patently speculative re: relevance to your circumstances. How does lacquer age?

If you case your guitar regularly, check the case. If you can smell anything like that 'new car aroma', get rid of it. That smell is a bunch of VOCs that are accelerating the aging of your lacquer. A quality case is made of materials that minimize the VOCs. Your nose knows and your guitar is worth the best case you can afford. Did the factory send you a good case? Very unlikely.

If you store the guitar out in the open, check the room. Is it a very brightly lit? Direct sun? Lord knows nobody keeps a guitar in the sun, right? Florescent lights? Those are nasty... very nasty.

Thanks for shopping at Worthless Speculation Inc. Nice looking headstock... can we see the rest?
 

theon

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
936
;)
Aging of the top coat is typically a uniform yellowing that can exaggerate grain differentials. It's an added amber tone to the original look. I agree with those who suggest you're seeing is a natural evolution of the finish. New thoughts: Unless you've owned this guitar for awhile, it seems rather rapid to me. Assuming you could not see this grain differential as recently as five years ago, I'd say it's too fast. If this is 15 years of change... then it's in line.

My Advice: Humbly offered and noted as patently speculative re: relevance to your circumstances. How does lacquer age?

If you case your guitar regularly, check the case. If you can smell anything like that 'new car aroma', get rid of it. That smell is a bunch of VOCs that are accelerating the aging of your lacquer. A quality case is made of materials that minimize the VOCs. Your nose knows and your guitar is worth the best case you can afford. Did the factory send you a good case? Very unlikely.

If you store the guitar out in the open, check the room. Is it a very brightly lit? Direct sun? Lord knows nobody keeps a guitar in the sun, right? Florescent lights? Those are nasty... very nasty.

Thanks for shopping at Worthless Speculation Inc. Nice looking headstock... can we see the rest?
Worthless Speculation? Sounds like pretty informed advice.
 
Messages
11
Aging of the top coat is typically a uniform yellowing that can exaggerate grain differentials. It's an added amber tone to the original look. I agree with those who suggest you're seeing is a natural evolution of the finish. New thoughts: Unless you've owned this guitar for awhile, it seems rather rapid to me. Assuming you could not see this grain differential as recently as five years ago, I'd say it's too fast. If this is 15 years of change... then it's in line.

My Advice: Humbly offered and noted as patently speculative re: relevance to your circumstances. How does lacquer age?

If you case your guitar regularly, check the case. If you can smell anything like that 'new car aroma', get rid of it. That smell is a bunch of VOCs that are accelerating the aging of your lacquer. A quality case is made of materials that minimize the VOCs. Your nose knows and your guitar is worth the best case you can afford. Did the factory send you a good case? Very unlikely.

If you store the guitar out in the open, check the room. Is it a very brightly lit? Direct sun? Lord knows nobody keeps a guitar in the sun, right? Florescent lights? Those are nasty... very nasty.

Thanks for shopping at Worthless Speculation Inc. Nice looking headstock... can we see the rest?
Wow. Thanks for the advice! I usually just keep it inside the padded gig bag it came with. This is the only picture I have of the whole guitar:

 

great-case.com

a.k.a. "Mitch"
Messages
5,748
I studied your photograph more closely and noticed another hypothesis to consider. The Volatile Organic Compounds emitted by some people's feet can cause instant wilting of flowers, aging of lacquer and rusting of strings. It's called ToeJam Mojo and often employed as a relic technique.

:hide Sorry for the lame humor. My final advice is this. Gig Bags suck. If you love these guitars, get good cases, don't lean them against a wall like that and
:beerGET OFF MY LAWN !

* I often recuse myself from these conversations because I take a very firm stance on Curatorial Concerns. It's my job and it can be annoying to a certain segment of the TGP world. I have 'beaters' that do not enjoy the luxury of my OCD, but my limited edition / rare and highly upgraded guitars live in the finest digs I can afford.
 




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