Weird truss rod issue! Please help!

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by Kidguitar12, Apr 4, 2015.

  1. Kidguitar12

    Kidguitar12 Member

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    Oct 14, 2014
    Hello everyone!
    So I have an awesome parts caster tele with a Robert Gilmore neck on a warmoth body. My action is a little to close for my liking so I loosened the truss rod (the truss rod adjustmemt point is in the headstock on this neck) not quite a full turn, pulled the Allen wrench out, tuned her up and the neck just needed a little more loosening. So I tried putting the wrench back in and it wouldn't go. I looked with a flashlight and it appears that the truss rod has now angled itseft in such a way that I can't get the wrench in at the right angle to adjust now. The head of the rod moved in the direction of the fretboard and now I can't even see the whole thread pattern, it's like its hidden in there. What are my options? Bore out the hole?
     
  2. Monkeyman

    Monkeyman Supporting Member

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    Mar 26, 2014
    You should not have turned it more than a quarter of a turn and waited for the results. I would wait for a day to see what the wood does. If you can find a slim socket to achieve contact then no problems. Need to know what type of adjustment your dealing with, hex, nut, screw, that you are dealing with? Don't panic, if all else fails proceed to your local luthier for help.
     
  3. Kidguitar12

    Kidguitar12 Member

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    It's a hex head. The guitar has already sat for more than 1 day already.
     
  4. cardinal

    cardinal Member

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    That's pretty weird. Nearly a full turn on a truss rod would be a lot of movement, so the action must have been more than just a "little" too close?

    I go into this forum's Luthier section and post a pic and see what they say.
     
  5. stormin1155

    stormin1155 Member

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    First of all, the purpose of your truss rod is NOT to adjust action. It is to adjust neck relief. Yes, it does affect action, but once it is set for the right relief you leave it alone. You set string action at the bridge and nut. By using your truss rod to adjust action you likely muck up your relief.

    As for the problem you are asking about, sounds like the whole rod turned, or, if it is a single action rod, by loosening it, the nut might have separated from the rod. In any case, probably something for a good tech to take a look at.
     
  6. straycat113

    straycat113 Member

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    A lot of guys are scared to death to adjust their truss rod but it is really simple and there is nothing to worry about if you turn in small increments. A whole turn was way too much and if you were tightening the rod you could of really damaged it. Just bring it to a good tech and I am sure he will solve the sissue. I think you may be a little gun shy right now but if the wrench came out smoothly I can't understand your not being able to get it back in. As already stated your truss is not for setting the height of your action though if a neck do to weather changed and you wanted to take out the the relief it will bring the strings closer to the fretboard as you are just straightening the neck.In the future remember very small turns at a time, as even a quarter turn can make a big difference.
     
  7. hunter

    hunter Supporting Member

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    Not that I necessarily prefer it, Erlewine suggests fully removing, cleaning and lubing and retightening the truss rod nut (not for two way!). Needless to say, this encompasses many turns of the nut both loosening and tightening and he isn't taking several days to do it. From a perspective of adjusting the rod to achieve a certain value of relief, small changes are probably prudent. No reason to overshoot and need further adjustments in the other direction later.

    I tend to make small moves but I think the danger of the big move may not be as great as we typically think.

    As to the OP problem? No idea. Almost sounds like the nut fell off the rod. But I suppose the rod could be broken. Looks like Gilmore often uses a two way rod. With a two way rod, I am having a hard time picturing how you'd get the result you describe unless the rod was broken. Maybe the wood structure shifted?

    hunter
     

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