West Coast Blues Thread Version 17

Discussion in 'The Sound Hound Lounge' started by fretshop, Aug 26, 2013.

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  1. Stringmaster

    Stringmaster Gold Supporting Member Silver Supporting Member

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    The Embie bridge is a "new and improved" version of the old Melita Syncrosonic bridges usually associated with Gretsch guitars. I've played the little Dunham with one fitted and it feels/sounds/looks nice--I didn't have any problem palm muting or tearing my hand up from what I recall--as it doesn't have those high screws/studs like the Melita (which don't work well for my style).


    http://embieconcepts.com/
     
  2. RickyKing

    RickyKing Supporting Member

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    Very cool! Thanks!!
     
  3. StaxKing

    StaxKing Member

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    Seeing that repo bridge reminded me to post that my friend agreed to let me buy his '55 Gretsch as seen in the recent vids. It is such a killer tone machine. Perfect for the jump/wc style. :) :)
     
  4. pete kanaras

    pete kanaras Member

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  5. fretshop

    fretshop Silver Supporting Member

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    Ricky,

    Most of the 50's H-44s that have come though here looked a lot like Poplar. I could be wrong. The bare instruments had a nice ring to them when tapped.
     
  6. stratocat63

    stratocat63 Supporting Member

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    Good for you, I thought that guitar sounded great, if I'm remembering the right clip. I've had my '56 for probably around 20 years and totally love it.
     
  7. Carmour

    Carmour Member

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    My pine tele that got stolen had a sick sick sparkle, was light as a feather, and the wood really resonated because it was just a white wash and oil paint job

    I miss that tele :(..

     
  8. RickyKing

    RickyKing Supporting Member

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    I still believe that your stolen guitar will come back to you..Karma..
     
  9. Carmour

    Carmour Member

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    The new one is doing just fine, better than fine in fact. Just need to learn how to dial it in with my amp is all... hot pick ups are hot!
     
  10. RickyKing

    RickyKing Supporting Member

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    Sho' nuff! Your old one is in your town somewhere...It will surface when you least expect..
     
  11. Scott Miller

    Scott Miller Member

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    OK, this is sticking in my craw. There's this Facebook petition thingie to tell Congressman John Conyers to change "The Jazz Preservation, Education and Promulgation Act of 2014" to "The Blues and Jazz Preservation, Education and Promulgation Act of 2014", because, as people are saying, jazz came from blues.

    Except that I am pretty strong in my belief that jazz did not come from blues. It's a common thing to think, but just listening to old blues and old jazz, I don't see any evolution from blues to jazz. I think John Storm Roberts makes a pretty solid case in "Black Music of Two Worlds" that blues and jazz share the same Africanisms in their origins, and have definitely cross-pollinated, but are ultimately independent in origin; one did not follow from another.

    I can't think of any other place on the Interwebz where people know more about blues than in this here thread, so if anyone can convince me that jazz came from blues, I would be a little less pissed off, which is what I am, since it seems like blues fans are so ignorant about blues. Which I guess is no surprise.
     
  12. Nonvintage

    Nonvintage Member

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    The difference between Jazz and Blues is education. Definitely IMHO. There is soul however, in both.
     
  13. RickyKing

    RickyKing Supporting Member

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    http://m.youtube.com/watch?feature=kp&v=f5Hbh_-IRs8&desktop_uri=/watch?v=f5Hbh_-IRs8&feature=kp

    Sorry I still can't figure out how to imbed, but
    Ok..I think that this is both...jazz and blues...comes both ways...
     
  14. rhartt1234

    rhartt1234 Member

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    I think the common use of the 12 bar Blues progression in Jazz is pretty strong evidence for Blues and Jazz having a common root. At some point, due to a variety of circumstances, Jazz went one way and Blues went the other.

    Thanks for hipping me to "Black Music of Two Worlds". I'll have to check that out. For quite a while I considered pursuing Ethnomusicology and still read quite a bit of it.
     
  15. Poppa Stoppa

    Poppa Stoppa Member

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    Ricky King posted this on Facebook: the T-Birds live in 82, with Keith Ferguson on bass. Check out JLV playing lap steel at 1hr 5mins.
     
  16. pete kanaras

    pete kanaras Member

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    i almost fainted when i first stumbled on that birds video. really too bad about the audio though, unless you're looking for the greatest Keith instructional video ever! only known footage of jimmie playing lap, yow that is bad-ass
     
  17. C-Bone247

    C-Bone247 Member

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    Interesting topicÂ… one I will certainly look into further. I must admit though, listening to my records over the years, I've always thought jazz came from blues.

    Maybe it's the "came from" part that's tripping folks up. Jazz "came with" blues might be more accurate.
     
  18. Stringmaster

    Stringmaster Gold Supporting Member Silver Supporting Member

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    Cool vid and surprised to see Jimmie playing steel, and a Stringmaster at that (how I got my handle).
     
  19. hasserl

    hasserl Member

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    http://www.redhotjazz.com/originsarticle.html

    http://library.thinkquest.org/18602/history/beginnings/beginningstart.html

    http://curiosity.discovery.com/question/who-was-earliest-jazz-musician

    http://jazz.about.com/od/historyjazztimeline/a/EarlyJazz.htm

    I think probably both forms of music developed at about the same time and in about the same way, but among slightly different people (Creole's vs blacks) from slightly different geography (New Orleans vs Mississippi). They both have much of the same roots, but not completely; Jazz has more influence from military marching bands and polkas, blues was more influenced from spiritual songs. Obviously an oversimplification, but I think that's the gist of it. And obviously a lot of cross pollination between the two. You really can't argue that early jazz musicians didn't borrow from the blues, probably more so than blues musicians borrowed from jazz.
     
  20. Scott Miller

    Scott Miller Member

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    I think that is true. Although if you consider the Charlie Christian - T-Bone - BB King progression, jazz influenced blues quite a bit. Throw in the Lonnie Johnson - Charlie Christian transition and things get complicated, because Lonnie Johnson lived in both genres.
     
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