Wet/Dry/Wet Rig question

sodapopinski

Member
Messages
3,383
Hey guys,

Question about the signal chain.
Dry= distortion only, I understand that.

On the Wet signal do you run a clean guitar signal only into the WET side or do you also include the distortion into that signal?

I've tried searching, but no luck. A follow up question, if you run only run clean signal into the wet do you make it 100% wet to only hear the trails?

I've included a diagram that shows what I'm thinking. Forgive me in advance, I'm sure this has been asked a million times, but I've been away from TGP for a few years and GAS has brought me back.

In the diagram the Dry signal will go into my amp and the Wet stereo signal will go directly into the house via a Strymon Iridium.
 

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NorCal_Val

Member
Messages
12,969
GTR into amp
dry amp out to 4x12
Slave Out to rack mixer with FX send & return.
Mixer out to rack power amp
Rack Power amp to 2 1x12s for stereo effects
 

Blix

Wannabe Shredder
Silver Supporting Member
Messages
25,978
Dry= distortion only is not usually what you want, I would put all the drive pedals in front of the JHS splitter. I have personally no interest in hearing distorted tone + effected cleans.
 

sodapopinski

Member
Messages
3,383
Dry= distortion only is not usually what you want, I would put all the drive pedals in front of the JHS splitter. I have personally no interest in hearing distorted tone + effected cleans.
Thanks, that's what I was thinking. None of the videos I watched played a clip of the wet channel with distortion that I could hear, it all sounded clear to me.

So then the diagram would be like the one below right?
 

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mentoneman

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2,843
Start over with the idea that the “dry” mono centered sound is any tone you would create if all you had was one guitar amp and speaker. clean, dirty, lead, clean with drive pedals...that’s your core mono sound you are starting with. And the main purpose of a wdw system is to maintain the integrity of that core dry tone without having to add verb/delay etc in the dry tone,
or using a traditional stereo rig and struggling with getting lost in the mix or having a hard time hearing yourself onstage when monitoring yourself acoustically and stepping outside of the sweet spot.

The stereo “wet” element—let’s say a stereo delay fx-
Is being fed a line level signal of your dry tone,

either by a line or slave out from the amp itself if your amp has that feature,

Or by inserting one many load box/attenuators on the market, between your amp and speaker, and creating a line output to feed your stereo effect.

My advice is that if this is your first foray into this world you might experiment with wet/dry first, just to get a glimpse of the benefit of blending a wet cab against the dry cab to appreciate the increase in clarity when using time based effects.
 

GearAche

New Member
Messages
2
Dry= distortion only is not usually what you want, I would put all the drive pedals in front of the JHS splitter. I have personally no interest in hearing distorted tone + effected cleans.
My W-D-W is:
Tone/drive pedals=> Mesa 5:25 Express Plus combo =>efx out to Lehle Splitter ll:
Direct => 5:25 efx in
Iso => mono input on time based stereo effects
Stereo effects=> stereo efx return on Crate Power Block 150 => Stereo Cab.
Sounds great.
Bonus for Lehle P-split II? Reverse it to take mono from Odyssey => Lehle ISO =>
Out Lehle Input and Dir => stereo Efx. From fat to huge. Don’t ask me how it works, but it’s in the manual.
 
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Pmg

Member
Messages
122
It’s up to you what you do. I run modulation, delay, reverb into the wet amp but not the dry. Same drives into both.
 

RicardoUK

Member
Messages
206
There's a bunch of ways to do it and it depends on what sound you're trying to get.

As said earlier, drive pedals after the split isn't orthodox. Think about what you're saying to the listener when you stomp a pedal on, and if you retain your clean signal after putting your foot through the Metal Zone then it is a bit of a mixed message.

Heres a good tip though: have your wet amps with more headroom than your dry amp, you need fidelity, clarity and articulation to make your modulation and time based effects sound good.
 

mallcorn

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
699
Hey guys,

Question about the signal chain.
Dry= distortion only, I understand that.

On the Wet signal do you run a clean guitar signal only into the WET side or do you also include the distortion into that signal?

I've tried searching, but no luck. A follow up question, if you run only run clean signal into the wet do you make it 100% wet to only hear the trails?

I've included a diagram that shows what I'm thinking. Forgive me in advance, I'm sure this has been asked a million times, but I've been away from TGP for a few years and GAS has brought me back.

In the diagram the Dry signal will go into my amp and the Wet stereo signal will go directly into the house via a Strymon Iridium.
Simply put shape your guitar sound/tone before you leave the main/center (dry) amp head where gain or distortion will be added. Grap the dry amp head signal after the amp but before the speakers. Usually with some type of Line-Out device (Suhr RL or etc.). Send the line-out signal to your wet effects and the dry signal on to the speakers. If the line-out signal is clean then the dry signal is clean or if the line-out signal is distorted then the dry signal is distorted. The line-out signal will feed your wet effects (delay, reverb, etc.). Some delay/reverb type pedals perform better with distorted tone than others do. Example: H9 will sound better than a Strymon. Strymon will sound better with a clean signal. You can hate me for saying it but it is simply a fact. Try it.... You can setup the wet pedal, depending on which you buy, to respond after the pedal such as when you stop adding the wet effect does the signal trail off with repeats or just simply stop the wet signal sound. All depends on how you want to set it up within the wet pedal.

Once your guitar signal hits your wet effects - set the wet pedals to 100% wet or you can mix a little dry with them too. I prefer 100% wet but either work fine. Send the wet signal to a "re-amp device" such as the Loop Return of another amp, a power amp (stereo power amp is best), and then adjust the wet signal loudness to match what you are doing so the wet loudness is less than the dry signal, not louder or it just doesn't sound good.

I prefer a Stereo Power amp so I can send a wet delay to one side (left) at say 350ms and a wet delay to the other side (right) at say 700ms. Also, you could send reverb down one side but not both. It is truly a great sound. Have fun..
 

cardinal

Member
Messages
5,189
Wet/dry with separate amps/cabs is generally for delay, reverbs, modulations.

If you wanted just a blend of drive and "not drive" through the cabs, you could achieve that by just running your drive pedal in a mixer like the Boss LS2 or Xotic pedal etc. that lets you blend a loop of pedals with the drive signal.
 

ufguy73

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
4,722
Simply put shape your guitar sound/tone before you leave the main/center (dry) amp head where gain or distortion will be added. Grap the dry amp head signal after the amp but before the speakers. Usually with some type of Line-Out device (Suhr RL or etc.). Send the line-out signal to your wet effects and the dry signal on to the speakers. If the line-out signal is clean then the dry signal is clean or if the line-out signal is distorted then the dry signal is distorted. The line-out signal will feed your wet effects (delay, reverb, etc.). Some delay/reverb type pedals perform better with distorted tone than others do. Example: H9 will sound better than a Strymon. Strymon will sound better with a clean signal. You can hate me for saying it but it is simply a fact. Try it.... You can setup the wet pedal, depending on which you buy, to respond after the pedal such as when you stop adding the wet effect does the signal trail off with repeats or just simply stop the wet signal sound. All depends on how you want to set it up within the wet pedal.

Once your guitar signal hits your wet effects - set the wet pedals to 100% wet or you can mix a little dry with them too. I prefer 100% wet but either work fine. Send the wet signal to a "re-amp device" such as the Loop Return of another amp, a power amp (stereo power amp is best), and then adjust the wet signal loudness to match what you are doing so the wet loudness is less than the dry signal, not louder or it just doesn't sound good.

I prefer a Stereo Power amp so I can send a wet delay to one side (left) at say 350ms and a wet delay to the other side (right) at say 700ms. Also, you could send reverb down one side but not both. It is truly a great sound. Have fun..
curious why you say that about H9 vs Strymon? I have been using a Timeline for a while and haven’t noticed any issues with gained up tones?

also, if you add dry into the wet cabs via not setting modulation pedals 100% wet, don’t you need to worry about phasing/latency issues between the dry in the dry can and whatever amount of dry you have in the wet cabs - especially if the modulation pedals have A/D/A conversions of the dry signal (like the H9, for example) and are not analog through?
 

mallcorn

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
699
curious why you say that about H9 vs Strymon? I have been using a Timeline for a while and haven’t noticed any issues with gained up tones?

also, if you add dry into the wet cabs via not setting modulation pedals 100% wet, don’t you need to worry about phasing/latency issues between the dry in the dry can and whatever amount of dry you have in the wet cabs - especially if the modulation pedals have A/D/A conversions of the dry signal (like the H9, for example) and are not analog through?
Regarding the H9 versus the Strymon - I knew it was coming... :) I have owned both. I have always been a "big three" (Strymon) guy. When the H9s came out, I gave them a try and this is what I experienced. I looked into it further to find that there are many others that share the same result. A/B them side by side. That is the best advice I can offer a person in doubt. Always buy and believe in what you have tried and tested to be the best for your application.

I have two H9s that are post gutiar amp. They are setup to run thru whatever signal they are fed. If the H9 adds delay/reverb, the post signal has delay/reverb added to whatever signal it received. If the H9 doesn't add anything, the signal is passed thru the same way it enters. When I tried adding some "input dry" to the wet reverb or delay, I didn't experience any latency or phasing but much preferred the all wet output. The more stuff you stack on to a complicated setup the more issues you might uncover and have to work thru. The only issue I found was having too many grounds when I ran a guitar amp, PSII, stereo power amp, and pedal-board power thru the same power source, it introduced ground loops. I could replace the PSII with another product that addressed the grounding in a different way and I then didn't experience the ground loops. If you use a mic mixer to mix and feed wet and dry to a power amp you might introduce phasing and latency that you mentioned above but I've never tried that.
 




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