What amp to you start with trying out a new guitar?

Jonny D

Member
Messages
1,283
As for me, I always start from my Deluxe Reverb. If a guitar doesn't sound worthy through that, then no other amp is going to help it for my purposes.
 

skiltrip

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
2,484
A Deluxe Reverb sounds like a good choice to me. I hate when they try to stick you at some lame modeling amp I'm like...uh.... What else you got?
 

Cussion

Member
Messages
1,465
Fender Blues Jr or Blues Deluxe/DeVille
They can be found at all of my local musicshops. Clean and neutral.
 

Mattbedrock

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
4,770
I agree. I start with a clean Fender/fender style circuit. It lets you hear the guitar.
 

JackStraw12

Member
Messages
4,760
When I sold guitars/pedals I always directed them to the Fenders. Usually I try the SF dual showman or a DRRI.
 

tulk1

Member
Messages
490
If possible, I try to find a Vox AC30 or a clone. Most familiar with what that amp brings to the scene. Gives me the best chance of hearing the guitar.
 

RJLII

Senior Member
Messages
10,347
Usually something clean and balanced that doesn't color the sound. My first pick is a DRRI, and almost every shop seems to have one.
 

NativH

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
629
JTM45 because I can get beautiful full singing cleans, or great overdrive to see if the guitar (and its pickups) hold together well. Some will lose all note seperation rather quickly when pushed, plus I can see if there is too much inherent feedback in the guitar/pickup combination.
 

GasMask

Member
Messages
3,418
None. Study the sound of the guitar acoustically first. If it doesn't sound great unplugged, you'll just end up fighting it later- swapping pickups, amps, etc....
 

kimock

Member
Messages
12,520
Black or silver face Fender if one's available.
Any open back tube combo if no Fender available.

Wouldn't put too much stock in a sealed cab SS amp for electric guitar evaluation purposes.
 

the tourist

Member
Messages
3,404
Usually I'll ask to go into one of their little rooms with used amps in it. When I got my Gretsch last week, I tested it out on an old Marshall (not sure of the model) through a matching 4x12, a Trace Elliott combo, and a handwired Vox AC15. Spent 10 minutes with it and I knew I wanted it.
 
Messages
4,674
No amp. If a guitar doesn't resonate well on its own, it's always going to sound kinda dead. You can change electronics. You can't change wood.

After I play it unplugged, I'll go to any amp I'm familiar with so I can gauge the sound. But I've bought a number of guitars without even plugging them in.

-Nick
 

DrJamie

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,612
Fender Vibro-King was my favorite tester. Nowadays a Deluxe Reverb works fine. Not as many VK's around now.
 

Rumble

Instrumental Rocker
Gold Supporting Member
Messages
2,517
When I want to know what a particular guitar really sounds like, I run it through my 1965 Premier B-160 guitar/bass amp. Has minimal circuitry, no bells or whistles, just pure sound.
 

Mrosinski11

Member
Messages
251
JTM45 because I can get beautiful full singing cleans, or great overdrive to see if the guitar (and its pickups) hold together well. Some will lose all note seperation rather quickly when pushed, plus I can see if there is too much inherent feedback in the guitar/pickup combination.
I wish my local stores had a JTM45 to try guitars with. Nice..
 

Mrosinski11

Member
Messages
251
I used to always go to Fenders as well, but depending on the model, they have such a glassy or sometimes creamy tone that I don't always get a perfect representation of the guitar. I tend to go to a few different amps, and make a composite sound in my head. Even SS amps have their place as they don't flatter the guitar. I remember when I bought my EBMM Axis I kept comparing it to other guitars through a Fender Deville, I think.. Anyway, it wasn't until I had bought the guitar and ran it through my setups that I realized that the neck pickup wasn't as glassy clean as I had thought. And the amps I was running are arguably better then the Fender was, but not glassy... so.. I no longer think of a Fender sound as a neutral clean. A great clean, but not neutral.
 

gtrs

Member
Messages
2,791
None. Study the sound of the guitar acoustically first. If it doesn't sound great unplugged, you'll just end up fighting it later- swapping pickups, amps, etc....
This approach has never failed me.
I made a major trade for a R9, never plugged it in. Strummed some chords in the parking lot (needed a setup BAD) and knew right away it was good.
It's turned out to be the BEST LP I've ever played.
 




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