What are some of your Favorite Guitar Picks? Why?

Messages
4
My personal Favs are

Fender Medium 346

V-Pick euro II

V-Pick Screamer (pearly and Blue screamer)
Mini triangle.


Ultra Cool Carbon Fiber Picks 1.00mm triangle


TusQ Triangle .88 and 1.00mm Triangle (rounded)

Dunlop .88 Ultex triangle (rounded)

The smaller picks are my fav for faster playing, the other picks are more for harder strumming or more mellow meaty riffs. Also, if i have to use finger picking, the bigger triangle picks work best because i will always have a point vs the traditional teardrop, i have to stop and look for the point then begin playing. :JAM:rotflmao
 

dramaticrunner

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,839
 

Ray175

Member
Messages
905
For years (1974 to 1995) I used 4 genuine tortoiseshell picks given to me by the father of a friend, who played in a world famous jazz big-band. He taught me how to get the best out of a 2mm pick, even with lighter strings. Over the years they slowly disappeared and I fell back on more mudane picks which did the job but were nothing exceptional.
Last month I bought a Hense Happy Turtle Extra Heavy 2mm pick in moonstone, on the recommendation of a friend. I immediately found the "feel" of the tortoiseshell picks I grew up with. They work great for 90% of what I do, the exceptions being celtic mandolin where it really is too stiff to give me the control I want with dual course strings, and heavy acoustic strumming on my 1973 Ibanez Everley brothers (soft is fine, heavy is too percussive).
I was amazed that the pick worked equally well on my ES-175D with Pyramid Gold 14's, as on my 1961 Custom Shop strat with 9's, or for flatpicking a Martin JM, or on my Höfnet violin bass on the rare occasions I want fast runs picked close to the bridge (otherwise I'm a fingerstyle player......
At 12 euros each, they are quite expensive - but I've ordered 3 more from Thomann to see me through my retirement.
They suit me and how I play - doesn't mean they will suit everyone. As usual YMMV.
 

Blix

Wannabe Shredder
Silver Supporting Member
Messages
29,181
For years (1974 to 1995) I used 4 genuine tortoiseshell picks given to me by the father of a friend, who played in a world famous jazz big-band. He taught me how to get the best out of a 2mm pick, even with lighter strings. Over the years they slowly disappeared and I fell back on more mudane picks which did the job but were nothing exceptional.
Last month I bought a Hense Happy Turtle Extra Heavy 2mm pick in moonstone, on the recommendation of a friend. I immediately found the "feel" of the tortoiseshell picks I grew up with. They work great for 90% of what I do, the exceptions being celtic mandolin where it really is too stiff to give me the control I want with dual course strings, and heavy acoustic strumming on my 1973 Ibanez Everley brothers (soft is fine, heavy is too percussive).
I was amazed that the pick worked equally well on my ES-175D with Pyramid Gold 14's, as on my 1961 Custom Shop strat with 9's, or for flatpicking a Martin JM, or on my Höfnet violin bass on the rare occasions I want fast runs picked close to the bridge (otherwise I'm a fingerstyle player......
At 12 euros each, they are quite expensive - but I've ordered 3 more from Thomann to see me through my retirement.
They suit me and how I play - doesn't mean they will suit everyone. As usual YMMV.
Looks like they're made from the same material as Red Bear and Hawk picks. Good to have another alternative on this side of the pond.
 

JCantrell

Member
Messages
913
Herco Flex 75 is the one I always keep coming back to. Either the older (newer style) dark grey ones or the newer holy grail (vintage style) light grey ones, they're pretty similar.

Also use dunlop tortex all the way from .6 to 1.14 for different sounds too. Most commonly .88s or 1.0s
 

mrpinter

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
9,316
These are the my favorite picks currently. The first one is the Gravity Gold series Stealth in Big Mini size. It is a fairly bright toned pick; not as bright as acrylics and without their "ping" and chirp; it's width and material used give a secure grip, while the smallish size gives a feeling of more control than regular Fender 351 size picks - but is just big enough to hold onto securely. The rather heavy 2.5mm thickness and sharpish point makes for an aggressive attack I like for rock type stuff.
vyZ1x3O.jpg


Next is another Gravity Gold with a different shape that I use interchangeably with the Stealth. It feels pretty much like the Stealth playing, but I like the thinner 1.5 thickness for lighter strings (this is a .009–.043 set, the first guitar has .009–.046 strings).
GiiefjV.jpg


The Blue Chip picks are a bit darker toned than the Gravity Golds and the mellower sound and attack is perfect for flatwound strings. Like the Gravity picks, the material used has a "grabbiness" that gives a secure grip - they don't get dropped. I like this kind of shape, and this pick's shape and size is similar to the Gravity Stealth - so for me it has a nice familiar feel.
hCe8yLf.jpg


This Golden Gate is what I use for my electric twelve string. For some reason I like it's slightly bigger size than the others for this guitar, maybe because I play it almost like I play acoustics - for which I also prefer a larger pick. This has a beautiful tone - not quite as bright as the Gravity Golds, which is fine because this guitar is naturally bright and jangly, and doesn't need a bright pick. It's about 1.5mm thick - OK for strumming electric strings and thick enough for a confident feel when doing arpeggios.
pdnlsHT.jpg


Finally, for my acoustic I use a Gravity Thin Pick. The thinner .77mm thickness is a perfect happy medium for strumming and just thick enough to feel good picking out single notes. And the raised text feels good in the fingers and gives a nice secure grip. (and I know my strings needed changing when I took this photo).
4pNNRei.jpg
 
Messages
7,665
Dunlop .73 Tortex. The yellow one.
It has the right amount of give for me to play aggressive or funk. Heavier than this I can still play funk but it's just not as smooth. The tone sounds right to me.
Round tip....It has a more raw attack than pointed. It's just a bigger sound.

I can use any pick and adapt very quickly. But this one works best for me in a wide variety of playing styles.
 

OotMagroot

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
10,687
I'm currently using Jimmy Dunlop's 50th Anni, gold nylon picks in .73. I was using thicker picks - going all the way to .420 Flows. So, using the .73 nylons now, everything is floppy but my rhythm playing is a great deal cleaner.
 

Yr Blues

Member
Messages
2,870
EJ Jazz has the clearest tone ever, though it feels so cheap for some reason. It's also extremely speedy and easy to maneuver.

.38 Dunlop nylon for strumming. Nothing else feels as effortless.

Pearse Fast Turtle for steel acoustic and even nylon. Super jazzy. Huge volume. Perfect grip.

Fingers are great. Use them appropriately.
 

guitarnet70

Member
Messages
4,682
Gravity Classic "JHS" edition with unpolished bevels.

Been using before the Pickboy Carbon 1.00 for about 25 years (still have 100 in a closet, LOL)
 

cap10kirk

Member
Messages
9,577
Dunlop Flow 420. I like the size, feel, and tone. And being 4.2mm thick, they're easier for me to hold onto with a much lighter grip than thinner picks, which has definitely helped improve my picking hand technique.
 

Chic-Pop

Member
Messages
1,335
A one hundred year old upright bar piano finally succumbed to all the spilled beers, pounding abuse, and years of rodents nesting in the harp cavity. (Quite an accumulation of toxic dust clinging to the insides as it caved in). It yielded enough of the remaining key toppers to last through my lifetime. I just tried one out being put to the strings on a whim; the thickness seemed right and sized for a decent blank to form into a pick. Evokes a great melancholic affection when playing; almost something of a reverential prayer. Being kept reserved for my in-home use only. Music expression (non-commercialized) can create a proper respect in the whole brutal circle of life...
 

BlueWolf

Mutations Expert
Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
1,677
Red Bear makes a great pick, and for years I used Dunlop John Petrucci Flow picks. These days, I am sold on BlueChip picks, particularly the IBJ55. I‘m primarily a Jazz player, and the IBJ55 gives me a nice fat, warm sound. They also seem to hold up very well to wear.
 

crxshdxmmy

Member
Messages
5,978
Love my Blue Chip picks.

I have 3 of the Jazz LG size and am partial to the 40 thickness with grip holes. That’s the one I play most for electric, though I do have a few Gravity Stealth and Sunrise big minis with various grip textures that make the rotation on occasion.

For acoustic, I use Tortex .60 and have been rocking the black Jazz 3 size for that. I do use a Jazz LG 35 Blue Chip sometimes though, too.

4-F05-BF5-B-D469-401-A-AD47-586-AA6583179.jpg
 

GA20T

Member
Messages
4,958
I'm a finger style player, but I sometimes will use a Golden Gate ivoroid thumb pick when I need the added projection on acoustic. I need to sand them down a bit to get them to respond and sound more like a nail.

Sometimes a Herco gold is just the ticket when I want basic strummed acoustic or electric rhythm parts to jangle and chords to bloom.

Max Grip Jazz III in carbon fibre is easily my favourite for mandolin (prime tone sculpted is great too), and I'll sometimes use it for lead-only on electric guitar just to change up the sound (attack) a bit. It's super grippy and slick enough that it introduces very little to no pick noise, which I'm no fan generally.
 




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