What are your "Pet Peeves" when it comes to guitars/gear?

Discussion in 'Effects, Pedals, Strings & Things' started by downburst82, May 23, 2017.

  1. KennyM

    KennyM Supporting Member

    Messages:
    1,724
    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2003
    Location:
    Burbank, Ca.
    Long thread that I only browsed so don’t know if it’s been hit on.... Back in the 70’s when I started getting serious about guitar, everyone with a few exceptions mostly played a Strat or LP through a Fender or Marshall. Everyone sounded completely different and unique.

    Now there’s dozens of fantastic amps and amp makers along with just as many different guitars and makers. Everyone tends to sound the same.
     
  2. Jazzmaster60

    Jazzmaster60 Member

    Messages:
    1,168
    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2013
    Why do you think everyone is sounding the same?
     
    Seymour Cash likes this.
  3. scott58

    scott58 Member

    Messages:
    4,845
    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2007
    Location:
    Northwest, indiana
    When someone says "but, that's not what it was designed for"....
     
    Kevsonic likes this.
  4. Seymour Cash

    Seymour Cash Supporting Member

    Messages:
    492
    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2017
    I don't have pet peeves. I just do my thing. I do have a pet dog and a few chickens. Life is much better when focusing on the bright side.
     
    turtleboy3 likes this.
  5. JosephZdyrski

    JosephZdyrski Member

    Messages:
    1,073
    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2019
    Guitars where the high e string slips off the fretboard too easily. I now triple check to make sure every guitar I buy doesn’t need nut adjustments to correct this or try to :/

    Pedals that make load popping sounds when engaged.
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2019
    NHBluesMan likes this.
  6. jimijimmyjeffy

    jimijimmyjeffy Member

    Messages:
    9,829
    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2015
    probably lotsa room for growth in the area of "smart practice versus more practice". Something in your practice habits is adding to the rut. In other words it is not your playing, it is your practice. Just my opinion. Make that your goal, and you'll figure it out.
     
    Alan Dunn and Silver Hand like this.
  7. Alan Dunn

    Alan Dunn Member

    Messages:
    615
    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2016
    Location:
    Australia
    Possibly a bigger issue than that unfortunately.

    I don't know if I'm right or left handed. I have left eye dominance so I shoot a rifle and a Bow left handed, and I also I air guitar left handed - but everything else I do right-handed. My big fear is I may actually be a lefty at guitar as well - but it's not a road I want to go down.

    Alternatively, I might simply have poor fine motor skills / dexterity and should maybe accept where I am as a player and just not expect to be as good as others are.
     
  8. Alan Dunn

    Alan Dunn Member

    Messages:
    615
    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2016
    Location:
    Australia
    Sounds like a conversation between Leo and Jimi.
     
  9. jimijimmyjeffy

    jimijimmyjeffy Member

    Messages:
    9,829
    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2015
    Yeah that's stinkin thinkin, lol. ;)

    Hold up your hand. Wiggle your fingers lightly, as fast as you can. Calculate the tempo of that. Pretty fast, huh? Well guess what, with better practice habits you can go even faster. Would you be happy if you coud play music that fast? Of course you would. You need to accept that there are good reasons you can't do what you want to do, other than that you just can't because you were born that way. Everybody is born that way.

    I play guitar wrong handed, by the way, just like you. Wouldn't have it any other way. There are positives to it for sure.

    You just have a few things to learn about how to get better. Three years is nothing. How fortunate you are to catch it now.

    The reason it seems impossible now, is that it is now impossible! You simply have not developed the brain space, the connections that have to grow, combined with muscles that have to grow. And you are playing with the wrong techniques, and not practicing the way you need to play and improve. And it has hurt your attitude.

    Took me a lotta years to feel this way. I used to feel like you. Just my opinion. :)
     
    bloobeastie, jimk4003 and Alan Dunn like this.
  10. jimk4003

    jimk4003 Member

    Messages:
    859
    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2013
    Location:
    Edinburgh, UK
    I agree with @jimijimmyjeffy entirely.

    I once tried to teach my brother a few chords on the guitar. He's taller than me, and gave up because his 'hands were too big'. He felt his lack of coordination was something physically wrong with him. It wasn't.

    Similarly, I once tried to teach an ex-girlfriend, who was 5'1", and she gave up too, because 'her hands were too small'. She too felt her lack of coordination was due to a physical limitation.

    Having big hands never stopped Ed O'Brien, Josh Homme, or Jim Root from becoming amazing guitarists, despite being taller than my brother. Having small hands never stopped Prince or Malcolm Young from being awesome players, despite both being the same height as my ex.

    The mistake both my brother and my ex made was that they mistook their lack of motor skills and coordination for some physical impediment, when actually it was due to a lack of practice. We all lack practice when we're starting out, and the key is to persevere and work at it.

    Django Reinhardt only had two good fingers on his fretting hand after injuring himself in a fire when he was eighteen, but went on to become a legendary guitarist.

    If you're prepared to put the time in, there's nothing stopping you.
     
  11. Alan Dunn

    Alan Dunn Member

    Messages:
    615
    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2016
    Location:
    Australia
    It's not from lack of practice - I play at least 5 hours a day and while I'm ok playing my own stuff I still struggle to emulate other guitarists / play covers even after 3 and a half years of playing.

    Knowledge wise I can sight read, I know all the notes on the neck, I can play roughly six different versions of every major and minor chord without hesitation, I know Minor 7, Major 7, Dom, Aug, and Dim 7, Fifths, Power Chords, I am comfortable playing Barre Chords using the A-shape, and E-Shape and moving between them, I can play three different triad shapes using the first three strings, I play one minor pentatonic scale, A hybrid blues scale, and a major scale [Which I'm ok at practicing but not so much using within a song for soloing.

    I have no intention of stopping as I really love playing I just wish I wasn't so slow at progressing.
     
  12. jimk4003

    jimk4003 Member

    Messages:
    859
    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2013
    Location:
    Edinburgh, UK
    Sure, I was talking about my brother and my ex when I talked about a lack of practice. My point was, there's nothing stopping you if you put the hours in.

    You sound like you are, and we all progress at different rates in different areas of our playing (you can sight read, for example, which already gives you a skill Eric Clapton doesn't have!).

    Being self-critical is good, but keep enjoying it too.
     
  13. stargazer747

    stargazer747 Member

    Messages:
    1,414
    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2016
    Location:
    NY
    1- Me too with untrimmed string excess, looks to me like a bit of a lazy A*S.

    2- I abhor messy pedalboards, even if you build flat one where you have to run all the connections and wiring on top in between the pedals, you can at least do it as neat and symmetrical as possible (use tie-wraps, wire clips attached to the board, etc...), and straighten out those pedals will you please? There is no need for large pedalboards to have a pedal or two left loosely and slightly angled not inline parallel with the others, I don't mind having to put some pedals vertically in order to fit them and reach with your foot but seriously, a few degrees left or right? Again, lazy A*S and don't preach to me about not having enough time to do these things because you're oh just so busy gigging and recording all over, nonsense.

    3- cable runs all the same color? you really want to make the mistake of connecting the wrong cable somewhere and waste time looking at them and scratching your head not knowing what goes where? Use color coordinated cables (or at least colorful labels at each end) to easily and quickly identify where you're connecting what, from your guitar, in front of amp, the two going from send and receive of the FX Loop, stereo rigs, anything else?

    4- using a plain ordinary instrument cable to connect the amp head into cabinet? you should really consider electrical hap-hazards and possible amp damage and use an authentic top brand speaker cable

    5- when I hear things like "Doesn't matter which strings brand and gauge I use, they are all the same" Utter nonsense, that goes for picks as well! Every little difference, nuance, makes up what your tone and playing will be like.

    6- players that setup and breakdown all spaghetti western like with nothing neatly setup and packed in a manner that it takes a minute to get ready, seriously, you cannot setup yourself up in the way that you don't have to get everything connected as if for the first time, example, use 5 pedals? and each and every time they have to be reconnected when you show up and then how long to get it all disconnected? And your cables all strung around like two 9 years olds getting their kite wires all tangled up? Get a pack of velcro wire wraps and neatly wrap the cables in a circular manner.

    7- Lastly, but maybe most importantly, not using the proper gear protection and just lug everything around loosely and clumsy prone to accidents and damage. Get a good hard shell case for that guitar, transport your amp head in at least a padded carry case, doesn't have to be an Anvil or Calzone flight grade one, your amp cab at least its own branded vinyl cover, and your pedals or pedalboard, get a nice pedalboard/case all in one or put it in a sturdy tour case. Your gym duffle bag with WORLD's or GOLD logo on it is all wrong!

    None of this takes a lot of money or time if its done right from the start and there are so many places to find anything you'll need, I can name one big place right now and you don't even have to exert any energy at all...www.amazon.com!

    Not being hypocritical here, just practical, there is a difference and it will be better appreciated.
     
  14. NorCal_Val

    NorCal_Val Member

    Messages:
    9,979
    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2010
    Location:
    Woodpile, CA
    Amp/pedal demos where I can here the acoustic sound of the electric guitar.
    "I'm demoing this 120w amp at conversation level.":jo
    FFS.
     
  15. rhyming_orange

    rhyming_orange Member

    Messages:
    347
    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2017
    Exactly.
    “Recorded sound from my phone” was something I put up with for years in a YouTube demo, but given how cheap and readily available even a basic I/O audio interface is now, there’s just no excuse for that anymore. Spend the extra time editing it into something listenable that actually represents the sound of the gear you’re demoing, not a tone where half the output is me hearing your strings thwacking away.
     
    NorCal_Val likes this.
  16. KennyM

    KennyM Supporting Member

    Messages:
    1,724
    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2003
    Location:
    Burbank, Ca.
    Conformity and more acute focus on what we admire that has come before us and less on taking a risk at being different. That’s stating it complimentary, but the flip side would be a simple desire to just retread what’s already successful. This isn’t just guitar related, it’s prevalent amongst all facets of the music business from music genre’s to production, to everything really.

    Let’s take the famous Phil Collins gated drum sound. Everybody heard it and went wow, we need our drums to sound like that on our record. That’s okay, musicians have always been influenced by current trends. The thing is when it came time for the next record most artists said we can’t do that again, we did that on the last record and so did everybody else. Those that did faded into obscurity and after a short period of time nobody’s using gated drum sounds.

    Contrast that to now where the auto tune effect was first heard decades ago and I can tell you from first hand experience having a building with 6 studios and a plethora of producers, songwriters, artists, etc., coming through, 20 years later and everyone still wants that vocal sound. It’s not just that they can’t sing in tune (many can’t) they want their vocal to have the same quivering sound as every other vocal recorded since 1998.

    Ironically the artists that really stand out don’t sound like that. I produced a remake for Pink and I barely touched two of her notes. Even with that it felt blasphemous. It’s always better, for better or worse to sound like yourself. The ones setting the trends know this.
     
  17. NorCal_Val

    NorCal_Val Member

    Messages:
    9,979
    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2010
    Location:
    Woodpile, CA
    And, here we have exactly what I'm talking about;

    No excuse for being able to hear the acoustic signal.(even though the amp is only 1W)
     
    scribbler likes this.
  18. jimijimmyjeffy

    jimijimmyjeffy Member

    Messages:
    9,829
    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2015
    annoys me too. Can't hear the product being demoed.
     
  19. Seymour Cash

    Seymour Cash Supporting Member

    Messages:
    492
    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2017
    That's easy. The abundance of social media and 'groupthink' has destroyed individuality. Back in the day we learned from phonograph records, and some local guys. Now, we all have access to every instructional vehicle imaginable and are trying to impress the whole world rather than the region that one resides in. Individualism is dead. We're all just good little global drones.
    Peace.
     
  20. kstrat62

    kstrat62 Supporting Member

    Messages:
    1,311
    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2005
    Location:
    Wildwood MO
    I don't like when Les Pauls have fret inlays on the 1st fret. I don't know why.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice