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What did you do with your CD collection post-digitization?

NicDo

Member
Messages
1,763
I only use my ipod for working out/walking. But i always take the inserts and disk out and throw out the cases. I took 5-600 empty cases to a recycling center last time i moved. They must have weighed 40 pounds.

I'm not interested in compromising on sound quality any more than i have to. Everything since LPs has been a compromise of losing fidelity for mobility. I won't buy anything as a download unless i have no other option.

I would love to buy a huge external drive- put everything on there, and make a very detailed searchable spread sheet. I'd love to be able to quickly find everything i have with say, Dennis Chambers on drums, or everything with Gary Grainger on bass. That will be a project in the coming years.
 

cbguy

Green & Gold Supporter
Messages
2,556
I just last week ripped the majority of my CD's to computer and then to iPod. I keep the CD's available in my living room to play on the CD player of my stereo (5:1 actually) setup. I'm storing several away in boxes, though, too.

I have officially eliminated CD's from my car, though. That was a nervous moment for me.
 

Celticdave

Seeker
Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
5,253
I recently completed the long process of digitizing my CD collection and they now rest peacefully in a box.

Did you sell them or keep them?

If sold, did you do it in bulk or one by one?

Thanks!
Slowly, over time they've all become digital copies and burnt to DVDs. Every once in awhile I'll burn it back to a CD and its amazing how nice that can be!
 

fazen

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,048
Yes, if you rip your CDs to a hard drive and then sell the CD, it's a federal crime.
That's funny. Really funny. Make everything a federal crime and everyone is a criminal. How do you prove all of this? Very funny.
 

Celticdave

Seeker
Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
5,253
That's funny. Really funny. Make everything a federal crime and everyone is a criminal. How do you prove all of this? Very funny.
How would they keep track of that at used CD stores? I've always wondered where the money goes in those type of stores. Do the record companies get another piece or is it full profit to the store?
 

EADGBE

Senior Member
Messages
12,338
I recently completed the long process of digitizing my CD collection and they now rest peacefully in a box.

Did you sell them or keep them?

If sold, did you do it in bulk or one by one?

Thanks!
What's the best way to digitize a collection? Computer or CD recorder?

Anyway I'd keep the originals just in case the copy got damaged.

If I was to sale them I think one at a time would bring in more money.
 
Messages
2,763
I have about 2000 CDs and not a single one of them is ripped onto a hard drive. In fact I have never ripped a CD.

Seems it would take a huge amount of time and effort.

But if I ever get around to doing it it will be FLAC or other lossless and I'll keep all the CDs as backups.
 

GA20T

Member
Messages
4,697
Digitized Lossless, Backed up on external, backed up on dvd twice, sold in bulk to more than pay for my external drive.
 

Kappy

Member
Messages
14,032
Seems it would take a huge amount of time and effort.
For me, finding a CD, loading into my CD player and waiting for it to load up, for each and every CD (some of which only have a track or two I want to listen to at the mo) is a huge amount of time and effort. Plus, if I'm in the mood for an eclectic mix (I mean REALLY eclectic!), I can just hit shuffle on 180,000+ tracks. If I'm in the mood to quickly mix 5 or 15 different artists together, I can create a custom playlist with those parameters in about 45 seconds and be listening to it in moments. How about a mix for a party that will last 4-6 hours (or a week for that matter) without manual interruption? You might like putting the time in with CDs, to me they are a thing of the past because I'd rather spend more time listening than fumbling with the 13 tracks/80 minutes of music in each unit.
 

GA20T

Member
Messages
4,697
How long does it take to rip one CD into FLAC?
3-10 minutes, depending on your system. I spent about 2 or 3 weeks ripping about 10 discs per day after work, plus more on weekends. So yeah, a huge time investment with a collection over 300 discs. In the end it's been worth it: no more scratches, no more lending discs out to never track them down again, and all the modern conveniences of itunes and portability. I have enough backups, and could make more later should I choose to, that I'll never have to deal with repurchasing the same album because of wear and tear. Still love vinyl though.
 

cram

Member
Messages
13,902
storage incase my digital storage mechanism with several layers of redundancy and separation fails me for some reason. I'll likely give them away at some point.
 

trickness

Analog with a side of DSP
Messages
1,901
I've recently started to go back and re-rip some of the more "audiophile" sounding stuff in my collection. Pretty much all my stuff was in Apple Lossless, which is certainly better than MP3 or AAC, but I still thought it sounded a bit harsh when cranked, so I ripped a bunch of stuff in AIFF (which is better than WAV if you're an Apple guy, because it retains metadata & artwork.)

To my ears, AIFF sounds the best, even though the improvements are subtle and hearing them is dependent on what you're listening thru. It's a 1:1 copy, so the file sizes are large (a little over 10 megs per minute of song). But storage is so cheap these days - a 1TB drive gives you a lot of change from $200. If you have a good CD/DVD drive, it takes less than 10 minutes to rip a CD, using error correction (which you should always do if you use iTunes).

I used to have crazy expensive audio gear, and certainly bought into the whole the cork sniffing thing, so perhaps there's a little bit of aural self-delusion at work here. But on fat, analog sounding recordings, I think AIFF (which is essentially the CD) sounds best.

I put all my CDs in plastic tubs I bought at Target, stack 'em and store 'em. I have three copies of all my digital files, back them up every day, but you never know. I've got 23,000 songs on my hard drive, I'd sure hate to have to go out and buy all this music again.
 

Kappy

Member
Messages
14,032
How long does it take to rip one CD into FLAC?
3-10 minutes, depending on your system.
And it's 3-10 minutes you can do other things on your system, like surf TGP, or whatever else you want. It's not like you're chained to the task. I ripped a couple hundred CDs over the course of a couple weeks kinda' leisurely while I was doing other stuff.

The hardest part, for me, is coming up with a good system for organizing the digitized music in a way that works for me, and, as the amount of digital data grows, making sure you will not lose it if any single disk (or disks) on your system dies.

Dave
 
Messages
2,763
3-10 minutes, depending on your system. I spent about 2 or 3 weeks ripping about 10 discs per day after work, plus more on weekends. So yeah, a huge time investment with a collection over 300 discs. In the end it's been worth it: no more scratches, no more lending discs out to never track them down again, and all the modern conveniences of itunes and portability. I have enough backups, and could make more later should I choose to, that I'll never have to deal with repurchasing the same album because of wear and tear. Still love vinyl though.
Thanks. That'd be 216 hours for me, taking the average of that (6.5 minutes per disc.

At some point I'll probably do it.
 
Messages
2,763
The hardest part, for me, is coming up with a good system for organizing the digitized music in a way that works for me, and, as the amount of digital data grows, making sure you will not lose it if any single disk (or disks) on your system dies.

Dave
Yes, this is the part I'm interested to find out about, the organizing and tagging, so you can create cool random play sessions afterwards by telling the playback sw to pick from several sub-categories.
 

Kappy

Member
Messages
14,032
Much of the time tagging happens automatically because good ripping apps (I'd recommend Exact Audio Copy if you're using Windows) will check FreeDB for the tagging info. But if you're like me and like fairly obscure music, you will be doing some manual tagging which, take it from me, is a huge drag. (I did forget to mention that in my post above). But once you have good tags in place, you can organize the music any way you want. If you import into your media player, you can then let the media player process your tags, then you can do all the regular searching that you want against these for the purpose of making mixes, etc.

Good luck!

Dave
 

Guitar Goober

Member
Messages
324
Still currently have all the CDs. I usually listen to MP3s from my PC through my hi-fi now. The convenience of being able to pick and listen to one song from thousands without having to hunt for the disc is great. Most of the CDs are just taking up space, I'm thinking about getting rid of ones that aren't from my favourite artists (I like to have the album art and liner notes for those, and be able to play the higher sound quality albums if I choose).
 






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