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What did you do with your CD collection post-digitization?

Messages
2,763
Much of the time tagging happens automatically because good ripping apps (I'd recommend Exact Audio Copy if you're using Windows) will check FreeDB for the tagging info. But if you're like me and like fairly obscure music, you will be doing some manual tagging which, take it from me, is a huge drag. (I did forget to mention that in my post above). But once you have good tags in place, you can organize the music any way you want. If you import into your media player, you can then let the media player process your tags, then you can do all the regular searching that you want against these for the purpose of making mixes, etc.

Good luck!

Dave
Thanks Dave. I just looked up Exact Audio Copy, looks good. Mind if I ask two more things? What do you use to convert the .wav files into FLAC, and what media player are you using?
 

Kappy

Member
Messages
14,032
Thanks Dave. I just looked up Exact Audio Copy, looks good. Mind if I ask two more things? What do you use to convert the .wav files into FLAC, and what media player are you using?
You're welcome. Hope the info's been helpful. Are you a Windows or a Mac user? On Windows I'm currently checking out Media Monkey. Not bad! With a collection as large as yours, iTunes might have some issues with it (it does with mine). The only other OS I use regularly (as a desktop/workstation) is Linux -- and I believe these will work on Mac too, but you might have to fenagle a bit: Rhythmbox is a nice one, Amarok is worth checking out (but is a bit of a PITA with a large collection, kinda' like iTunes), Banshee is also pretty cool. There's also a command-line one that has a lot of potential, but it had some serious bugs to work out the last time I tried it (about a month ago). I forget what it's called.

They all seem to have their drawbacks, actually. I thought I was pretty easy to please. Let me keep my files on the network, and let me sort them the way I want to sort them. Then let me import them into the media player and use the tags to sort through them/make playlists/sync my iPod. (O yeah, and I like to scrobble what I listen to, so I can be a nerd and monitor trends in my listening habits over the course of a few years. ;)). Apparently that's a lot to ask of a lot of media players. They seem to like smaller collections, stored locally. If it gets too big, or if it's over the network, they start getting flaky (like hanging while importing, not being able to fully import, slow load/access times). And in the case of iTunes, they like to do the organizing for you. But I don't trust them to do a good job organizing. Too much reliance on genres. And I hate pigeonholing music with genres! The good news is they all seem to support scrobbling fairly well.

Rhythmbox has actually been the one that's done just about everything I need it to do without much hassle. And that's the one with the least polished-looking interface, and it has a couple of annoying quirks that aren't really worth spending the time to get into in this post. I think I'm going to have to be the ultimate nerd and write my own media player. But with my pisspoor programming skills, it'll be a while before I have anything viable. Anyway...

For media conversion/FLAC, I'm using this: http://www.foobar2000.org/ Very cool app! It's a media player too, but the last time I used it, it wasn't as full-featured as the other ones I mentioned. I'm not sure what all you can use on a Mac for FLAC. To save space, I only store backups of audio in FLAC, I do all my listening in high bitrate MP3 mostly. It's a universal format, and I have enough problems playing my music with all the other things I'm doing, the last thing I need is another hurdle like a file format that isn't widely recognized. heh.

Good luck!

Dave
 

GA20T

Member
Messages
4,697
You're welcome. Hope the info's been helpful. Are you a Windows or a Mac user? On Windows I'm currently checking out Media Monkey. Not bad! With a collection as large as yours, iTunes might have some issues with it (it does with mine). The only other OS I use regularly (as a desktop/workstation) is Linux -- and I believe these will work on Mac too, but you might have to fenagle a bit: Rhythmbox is a nice one, Amarok is worth checking out (but is a bit of a PITA with a large collection, kinda' like iTunes), Banshee is also pretty cool. There's also a command-line one that has a lot of potential, but it had some serious bugs to work out the last time I tried it (about a month ago). I forget what it's called.

They all seem to have their drawbacks, actually. I thought I was pretty easy to please. Let me keep my files on the network, and let me sort them the way I want to sort them. Then let me import them into the media player and use the tags to sort through them/make playlists/sync my iPod. (O yeah, and I like to scrobble what I listen to, so I can be a nerd and monitor trends in my listening habits over the course of a few years. ;)). Apparently that's a lot to ask of a lot of media players. They seem to like smaller collections, stored locally. And in the case of iTunes, they like to do the organizing for you. But I don't trust them to do a good job organizing. Too much reliance on genres. And I hate pigeonholing music with genres! The good news is they all seem to support scrobbling fairly well.

I think I'm going to have to be the ultimate nerd and write my own media player. But with my pisspoor programming skills, it'll be a while before I have anything viable. Anyway...

For media conversion, I'm using this: http://www.foobar2000.org/ Very cool app! It's a media player too, but the last time I used it, it wasn't as full-featured as the other ones I mentioned. I'm not sure what all you can use on a Mac for FLAC.

Good luck!

Dave
Just out of curiosity, what issues does itunes have with large libraries? I'm using it with 250 Gigs (40,000 song library) worth of music. Haven't had any problems, but would definitely explore better options if available (I'm an OSX user).
 

Kappy

Member
Messages
14,032
Just out of curiosity, what issues does itunes have with large libraries? I'm using it with 250 Gigs (40,000 song library) worth of music. Haven't had any problems, but would definitely explore better options if available (I'm an OSX user).
iTunes hangs because it's choking on all the files when I point it at my 1.5TB worth of music for the initial import when I'm setting it up for the first time. I get the "not responding" thing over and over again, and the process takes like 18 hours to complete. And once that's done, I have experienced extremely slow load times when opening iTunes. And if I get fruity and decide to reorganize a huge directory (which sometimes happens), iTunes goes through the same, painful "not responding" issue to recalculate all the new tracks. I'm talking about a quad-core processor with a 64-bit OS and 4 gigs of RAM. This is not an underpowered machine by any stretch.

The hitch with me is the remote (network) storage of the media. But I seem to remember iTunes behaving this way even with a huge locally stored collection of audio too.

That's not all though. I have a heap of gripes from years ago too (and I don't think that's a complete listing either. I seem to remember finding new ones since then). I have noticed improvements in some areas, but not as much as I personally need.

It's remotely possible that iTunes works better on a Mac. I wouldn't know. But I'm dubious that it's just because I'm running it on Windows.

Dave
 

shredtrash

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
10,063
I keep them as backup. I don't want to lose $$$ replacing music I took so long to acquire.
 

GA20T

Member
Messages
4,697
iTunes hangs because it's choking on all the files when I point it at my 1.5TB worth of music for the initial import when I'm setting it up for the first time. I get the "not responding" thing over and over again, and the process takes like 18 hours to complete. And once that's done, I have experienced extremely slow load times when opening iTunes. And if I get fruity and decide to reorganize a huge directory (which sometimes happens), iTunes goes through the same, painful "not responding" issue to recalculate all the new tracks. I'm talking about a quad-core processor with a 64-bit OS and 4 gigs of RAM. This is not an underpowered machine by any stretch.

The hitch with me is the remote (network) storage of the media. But I seem to remember iTunes behaving this way even with a huge locally stored collection of audio too.

That's not all though. I have a heap of gripes from years ago too (and I don't think that's a complete listing either. I seem to remember finding new ones since then). I have noticed improvements in some areas, but not as much as I personally need.

It's remotely possible that iTunes works better on a Mac. I wouldn't know. But I'm dubious that it's just because I'm running it on Windows.

Dave
I'm with you on the duplicates. And, while my library was zippy-fast on Leopard using a USB 2.0 WD My Book external drive, after several iTunes upgrades and an install of Snow Leopard I'm having those same load time issues and hang-ups when scrolling through the main list. I attributed it to either the 2.0 USB, or the speed of the external drive, but it was never really a problem before. I think I'll try an upgrade to 4G ram from 2 and see if it has any effect..
 

cram

Member
Messages
13,902
iTunes hangs because it's choking on all the files when I point it at my 1.5TB worth of music for the initial import when I'm setting it up for the first time. I get the "not responding" thing over and over again, and the process takes like 18 hours to complete. And once that's done, I have experienced extremely slow load times when opening iTunes. And if I get fruity and decide to reorganize a huge directory (which sometimes happens), iTunes goes through the same, painful "not responding" issue to recalculate all the new tracks. I'm talking about a quad-core processor with a 64-bit OS and 4 gigs of RAM. This is not an underpowered machine by any stretch.

The hitch with me is the remote (network) storage of the media. But I seem to remember iTunes behaving this way even with a huge locally stored collection of audio too.

That's not all though. I have a heap of gripes from years ago too (and I don't think that's a complete listing either. I seem to remember finding new ones since then). I have noticed improvements in some areas, but not as much as I personally need.

It's remotely possible that iTunes works better on a Mac. I wouldn't know. But I'm dubious that it's just because I'm running it on Windows.

Dave
Bingo.
I had moderate success with real player for larger libraries and being able to actually see file names which was a huge problem with itunes.
 
Messages
2,763
You're welcome. Hope the info's been helpful. Are you a Windows or a Mac user? On Windows I'm currently checking out Media Monkey. Not bad! With a collection as large as yours, iTunes might have some issues with it (it does with mine). The only other OS I use regularly (as a desktop/workstation) is Linux -- and I believe these will work on Mac too, but you might have to fenagle a bit: Rhythmbox is a nice one, Amarok is worth checking out (but is a bit of a PITA with a large collection, kinda' like iTunes), Banshee is also pretty cool. There's also a command-line one that has a lot of potential, but it had some serious bugs to work out the last time I tried it (about a month ago). I forget what it's called.

They all seem to have their drawbacks, actually. I thought I was pretty easy to please. Let me keep my files on the network, and let me sort them the way I want to sort them. Then let me import them into the media player and use the tags to sort through them/make playlists/sync my iPod. (O yeah, and I like to scrobble what I listen to, so I can be a nerd and monitor trends in my listening habits over the course of a few years. ;)). Apparently that's a lot to ask of a lot of media players. They seem to like smaller collections, stored locally. If it gets too big, or if it's over the network, they start getting flaky (like hanging while importing, not being able to fully import, slow load/access times). And in the case of iTunes, they like to do the organizing for you. But I don't trust them to do a good job organizing. Too much reliance on genres. And I hate pigeonholing music with genres! The good news is they all seem to support scrobbling fairly well.

Rhythmbox has actually been the one that's done just about everything I need it to do without much hassle. And that's the one with the least polished-looking interface, and it has a couple of annoying quirks that aren't really worth spending the time to get into in this post. I think I'm going to have to be the ultimate nerd and write my own media player. But with my pisspoor programming skills, it'll be a while before I have anything viable. Anyway...

For media conversion/FLAC, I'm using this: http://www.foobar2000.org/ Very cool app! It's a media player too, but the last time I used it, it wasn't as full-featured as the other ones I mentioned. I'm not sure what all you can use on a Mac for FLAC. To save space, I only store backups of audio in FLAC, I do all my listening in high bitrate MP3 mostly. It's a universal format, and I have enough problems playing my music with all the other things I'm doing, the last thing I need is another hurdle like a file format that isn't widely recognized. heh.

Good luck!

Dave
Hey thanks for all that info Dave. I'm going to look into all the stuff you mentioned.

Platform can be any because I still have to get one - truth is I don't even own a comptuer, I take my work laptop home at night, but would buy a cheap system to stream music. Have actually been thinking about it for a couple of years since I read about the slim devices stuff.

I would prefer to have playback sw do random playback based on selection criteria (based on genres or other such tags...) rather than create playlists.

Anyway thanks very much, you've given me some great info.
 

Guitar55

Who was that masked man?
Gold Supporting Member
Messages
9,229
I've kept them, waiting on the day when media players get smaller and their capacities get larger so that I can then re-rip them all in a lossless format.
 

greenlander

Member
Messages
1,260
I still have all mine. Mostly classical stuff. Never owned an ipod or mp3 player and have no interest in them. I don't need to hear 7,000 different songs a day.

It's so weird to imagine how people back in history got along without recorded music. To hear music then, someone had to be physically playing an instrument. I bet music had much more of an impact then. Now you can have hundreds of thousands of songs stuffed in your pocket with your loose change. Kind've says something about the value of music today.
 

trickness

Analog with a side of DSP
Messages
1,901
It's remotely possible that iTunes works better on a Mac. I wouldn't know. But I'm dubious that it's just because I'm running it on Windows.

Dave
I think that's your problem. I've got a TB of music files, I have a Mac G5 and a Powerbook, neither of them have the problem you describe. In fact none of my Macs, which I have been using for music since 1999, have ever choked out because of large amounts of files. Must be an iTunes/PC thing.
 

iaresee

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
3,837
It's remotely possible that iTunes works better on a Mac. I wouldn't know. But I'm dubious that it's just because I'm running it on Windows.
Having migrated from Windows --> Mac about 1.5 years ago I can say that iTunes is much better at handling a large library when running on OS X instead of Windows XP. Much better. Search is actually responsive, usable. My wife's XP machine is painful to use iTunes on in comparison.

From Tiger --> Snow Leopard things get a little weird. Pre Snow Leopard OS X spun up all external drives when it returned from sleep. Now it doesn't. Which, IMO, is great because the computer gets back to useable much faster now. But it means if your iTunes library is on a MyBook, when you come back from sleep, the drive is still sleeping so you have to wait for a spinup when you first launch iTunes. If the MyBook sleeping really annoys you, you can wriite a little cron job that touches a hidden file on the drive every couple of minutes and keeps it from ever falling asleep.

And to the OP: I keep all my CDs in a big old chest of drawers here in my office. I can't part with them. In Canada it's kind of gray whether selling CDs after ripping them is legit or not. We're allowed to make private copies in Canada and *not* retain the original media. It's weird like that. Personally I can't let them go. I just love to look at them. To see physical media with music on it makes me happy. :)
 

ImmortalSix

Member
Messages
1,962
I keep mine, they're in a big "book" in my truck.

It's going to be fun to head up to the attic with junior one day and spin my old CD's

-Hunter
 
Messages
2,089
Mine are in a couple of racks in our back office ... we're talking thousands of CD's so there's no way I'm going to rip them all. But, with the new portable drives with a gazillion gigs ... I might reconsider next winter.

As it is, my son and wife like to go through them and rip them to their devices as needed. We generally listen from our living room DVD player that I have running into a sweet sounding set of studio desk monitors.

Now the LP's and tube amp are another story ...
 

xroads

Member
Messages
2,464
+1. I keep myCDs in a display case in my living room where my stereo is so I can listen to them there. iPod is for commuting/working out/any other remote application.

Still have yet to buy/download new music from iTunes.
This is what I do as well. I have ripped my CD collection in Apple lossless format on a 128G Ipod (which is full now), and back those up on an external disk. I use the ipod for my music room, commute, office, travel. The CDs are for the HIFI system in my living room.
 

shane8

Member
Messages
31,698
last time i checked CDs are digital media > anyhoo i have no interest in ripping anything > in fact i bought a new cd last week > it was garbage > i like having the pretty sleeve stuff > i hear enough of other peeps music when i'm out > don't need to add more and i don't commute or anything so ..... and i'd rather hear it thru a proper system
 

meterman

Member
Messages
7,965
I'm in the process of ripping all of mine as WAVs and will then store them away. I'll burn CDs for listening in the car but don't risk scratching up the originals. Sometimes I'll convert to MP3 and make a mix CD with 4-5 albums on it...

So, what's the difference/benefits of FLAC over WAV??

thanks,
 

Kappy

Member
Messages
14,032
Call me crazy, but I like my CDs and I really enjoy the concept of owning an album by an artist that I really admire, so I keep them on my shelf and display them proudly.

I never bought an Ipod or any kind of portable MP3 player either...don't really have a need for them.
Cool for you! But,

1) Some (all?) CDs have a shelf life and will eventually no longer be playable.
2) CDs get scratches and can wind up unplayable.
3) CDs can get lost, lent and never returned, or stolen.
4) If you like the artwork, nothing's stopping you from keeping CDs that you've ripped to digital. I still buy (and keep, for the mo) all my music on CD.

For items 1-3 above, I personally hate re-buying CDs. There's other ways to "support the artist" (or the RIAA) without throwing your money out the window by buying something you already bought.
 

Big Boss Man

Member
Messages
2,455
Selling a CD after ripping it to your computer is illegal. I like to keep mine as a backup copy any way. You can just put the disc and sleeve in a folder and recycle the plastic cases to conserve space.
 






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