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What effect is on the into to this song?

ratedepth

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The Vox Ultrasonic was a guitar that had effects built into it. Sounds like the Repeater setting. Acid Fuzz makes a standalone pedal version
 

MikeMcK

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Each guitar has its own trem - A quick one on the guitar playing the chords and a slower one on the guitar playing the arpeggios. Sounds like a basic trem to me.
You sure? To me it sounds like one guitar with a trem that's fast on the attack but slows down. Assuming that's what an "envelope trem" is, that's what it sounds like IMO.

That may not have existed in the '60's, but it might have been possible in a studio, or even could have been someone manually controlling the SPEED knob on an amp.
 

MikeMcK

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It’s two guitars with different speeds on the tremolo.
Listen with headphones... I'm very sure I heard one guitar with trem, and the trem slowed down in time with the measures. It's most obvious on the first two measures.

No clue how they would have done that in the '60's but I'm sure that's what I heard. My best guess would be something like a reverse-sawtooth LFO controlling the tremolo speed and the band playing in time to the LFO.

I know synth-style LFOs weren't around yet, but something like that would have been feasible by knowledgeable engineers.
 

ratedepth

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truckin

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1,568
Each guitar has its own trem - A quick one on the guitar playing the chords and a slower one on the guitar playing the arpeggios. Sounds like a basic trem to me.
Is this how that “wobble” is achieved?
 

evanderbelt

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161
I agree--two guitars without a doubt. The arpeggios aren't interrupted by the strums and vice versa. If you played that part with an envelope trem your strums wouldn't ring out like that as you started arpeggiating. Definitely an effect of layering the two speeds.
 

MikeMcK

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6,016
I agree--two guitars without a doubt. The arpeggios aren't interrupted by the strums and vice versa. If you played that part with an envelope trem your strums wouldn't ring out like that as you started arpeggiating. Definitely an effect of layering the two speeds.
Are you guys listening with headphones? The trem speed is a gradient from fast to slow. It isn't envelope-based for the reason you mention, but it's absolutely a trem speed that seems to follow a reverse sawtooth.

BTW, someone linked another thread where someone else mentioned the reverse sawtooth LFO shape, so it's not just me (and no, I hadn't read that thread before). And to be clear, I'm not saying the trem itself is a reverse sawtooth pattern, I'm saying the trem speed follows a reverse sawtooth at a rate 1/4 the tempo of the song.
 

Moderato

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I hear more a lush bias tremolo than an harmonic one, its in that ball park imho, subdecay vagabond can do that (and you have both choices), also basic audio throbby can sound lush and beautiful... my 2c
 

MikeMcK

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How about two tremolos in parallel? :dunno
It wouldn't have that fast-to-slow gradient.

Remember, this was 1967. Revolver was out and engineers were trying to make things sound "weird" and "psychedelic." For all we know it could have been someone manually turning the "rate" knob in time with the music.
 

chankgeez

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It wouldn't have that fast-to-slow gradient.

Remember, this was 1967. Revolver was out and engineers were trying to make things sound "weird" and "psychedelic." For all we know it could have been someone manually turning the "rate" knob in time with the music.
True.

This was late '67/early '68 & allegedly done with a sewing machine motor:

 

truckin

Silver Supporting Member
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1,568
It wouldn't have that fast-to-slow gradient.

Remember, this was 1967. Revolver was out and engineers were trying to make things sound "weird" and "psychedelic." For all we know it could have been someone manually turning the "rate" knob in time with the music.
Maybe the chord guitar is set to a faster rate and the arpeggios are set to a slower rate, this giving the perception of it slowing down? Either way, both are set in time with the song. I also hear more of a bias trem here in that it sort of ducks out of the way when the chord is initially played, to
My ear at least.
 

MikeMcK

Gold Supporting Member
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6,016
Maybe the chord guitar is set to a faster rate and the arpeggios are set to a slower rate, this giving the perception of it slowing down? Either way, both are set in time with the song. I also hear more of a bias trem here in that it sort of ducks out of the way when the chord is initially played, to
My ear at least.
I'm just not hearing it... I guess I could be wrong, but I am clearly hearing a trem moving from fast to slow with every measure. I'm tempted to say it's halving in speed each time, but you can clearly hear the "in between" rates as it slows.
 




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