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What Happens After You Get Your Dream Guitar?

ragnar

Member
Messages
276
I get exactly what your saying. I've always lusted after things.. Guitars particularly.. to the point that when I got them it was anti climatic, and could never live up to the hype i'd created in my head.
I think this is usually the case with everything, at least for me. Things are rarely as awesome once we get them as the hype we build up in our heads.

They may be great, but we build them up so much - with so much excitement and anticipation - that there's no way for reality to live up to the dream.
 

C-4

Member
Messages
14,540
Since before I started playing guitar, I've dreamed of owning an R4 Les Paul Custom. I could realistically buy one in my lifetime, but I probably won't. I sometimes wonder what it would feel like after I actually bought one. Would I feel a sense of lasting satisfaction, or would I struggle with the loss of my dream and come up with a new guitar to dream about?

To those who have bought their dream guitar, how did you feel in the days, months, and years after?


Once I got my first dream guitar, I started thinking about my second, etc. I'm up to about 40+ now.

Each one gets better then the previous, and some dimensions change, but I'm pretty happy with what I currently have. I'm down to about 6-7.

You might be surprised at what you originally thought was your "dream guitar" and how things change, when you get a chance to play more guitars as the years roll by. Then again, maybe you won't. ymmv :)
 

twoheadedboy

Member
Messages
13,171
Once I got my first dream guitar, I started thinking about my second, etc. I'm up to about 40+ now.

Each one gets better then the previous, and some dimensions change, but I'm pretty happy with what I currently have. I'm down to about 6-7.

You might be surprised at what you originally thought was your "dream guitar" and how things change, when you get a chance to play more guitars as the years roll by. Then again, maybe you won't. ymmv :)

I've definitely had some dream guitars come and go. However, I've wanted an R4 Custom for over 20 years now. In that time, I've played several of them, and loved them all.
 

gitapik

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
873
You realize that one of the much less expensive guitars you owned, and jettisoned, during the loooong process of getting to your dream guitar Was ACTUALLY the dream guitar, but you were too obsessed with the next one to notice. And then your dream is to find that $400 Squier / Epiphone / Ibanez you let get away. Which is much harder to do because it wasn’t about tethering money to buy it in the first place.
Which is why I'll never sell my Silo Special. Twice the price of what that Squire etc is, but so much less than the "dream" guitar.

I'll keep looking...but I'm a big fan of being happy with and making the most of what I've got.
 

Dashface

Member
Messages
6,677
I’ve bought many dream guitars... And every time I enjoy it until about twenty minutes after I get it home.

Then I start chasing the next one :D
 

atarilovesyou

Member
Messages
558
My dream guitar doesn't exist, outside of a custom shop. They get so close, but not quite. Right now, it's a Green Dot Universe. But the current model is made in Indonesia with good but second tier hardware. And the fingerboard is Panga Panga (Nope-a Nope-a).

But it does have an all access neck joint, and that's what I would want vice the chunky tilt neck heel from the original MIJ model. The likelihood of Ibanez making this model again in Japan isn't out of the question, but probably not with the AANJ. They'd probably keep it to the orginal spec, like the Genesis series RG guitars.

Plus, the Wizard necks aren't really my favorite. I'd prefer a Soloist neck, which begs, why not go Jackson custom shop (when they start accepting orders again)? Well, I am not a fan of the volume knob placement on Soloists. And I prefer the RG body shape and fit. But I do prefer an OFR bridge. See where this is heading?

And so it goes.

A dream guitar for me is something by definition I can't ever really have. But I can still dream about it.
 

SupremeDalek

Member
Messages
776
When I got my dream guitar I played it. As much as possible. I already have "the one" amp, so now it's time to improve my playing!
 

Jazzandmore

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
12,773
I get exactly what your saying. I've always lusted after things.. Guitars particularly.. to the point that when I got them it was anti climatic, and could never live up to the hype i'd created in my head.

At 49 I've learned that is sign of losing perspective on why I fell in love with the guitar in the first place. It isn't about the guitar. If aquiring things is your drive then.. Imo... You will always end up disappointed.

To answer your question... Whats next after getting your dream guitar? Play the damn thing.

You discover that it's a lot heavier than you expected. ;)

You also start to think that maybe there's a better guitar for you somewhere out there, but without the same burning passion and need you felt initially.

I still love it - it's my main guitar and I play it all the time - but I also accept that it's not perfect, and that another guitar may suit me better. But now I'm in no hurry. I'll keep an eye out, and may occasionally try other guitars, but I'm happy to take my time and focus my time and energies on getting better as a player.

This sounds more like the psychology of how you all approach things, and is not at all related to guitars per se. You could build up too much hype/unrealistic expectations about a car, marriage, a job, etc.

Problem is it leads to a let down even if you are going to experience something really good.

Also are you thinking a guitar that does everything, or would you be thinking perfect Strat, Tele, Single Cut, etc.?

Dream guitars, easy to find imo because there are so many great builders out there.
 

Stinky Kitty

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
4,339
I recall reading that it took Charvel months to finally nail the guitar Guthrie Govan wanted as a signature model. Trial and error, a few changes here, a few there. With that in mind, few of us have ever been able to have a guitar company deal with us in like manner and over the years, I've learned that my "dream guitars" usually will be missing one or two elements that I had no control over during the "ordering process." As a result, despite being close, they never would check all the boxes because in the end, despite a laundry list of options, I was still buying someone else's interpretation on what a dream guitar should be. As a result, I keep looking and ultimately, I've come to the conclusion that unless I make one myself, these pursuits will always fall a bit short....even if they are $4K jobbers. The woods might be perfect but the hardware isn't truly what I want...the fretwork immaculate but the carve of the neck isn't quite there. How wonderful it would be to spec an instrument and then after owning it for a month, have the option of sending it back for additional morphing, carving, alterations, etc.

Now THAT would be a dream guitar.
 

Jazzandmore

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
12,773
I recall reading that it took Charvel months to finally nail the guitar Guthrie Govan wanted as a signature model. Trial and error, a few changes here, a few there. With that in mind, few of us have ever been able to have a guitar company deal with us in like manner and over the years, I've learned that my "dream guitars" usually will be missing one or two elements that I had no control over during the "ordering process." As a result, despite being close, they never would check all the boxes because in the end, despite a laundry list of options, I was still buying someone else's interpretation on what a dream guitar should be. As a result, I keep looking and ultimately, I've come to the conclusion that unless I make one myself, these pursuits will always fall a bit short....even if they are $4K jobbers. The woods might be perfect but the hardware isn't truly what I want...the fretwork immaculate but the carve of the neck isn't quite there. How wonderful it would be to spec an instrument and then after owning it for a month, have the option of sending it back for additional morphing, carving, alterations, etc.

Now THAT would be a dream guitar.

But why not have it built from scratch with the woods, hardware, neck carve, wiring, etc. that you want? I wanted this particular builder because I really love his design. From there we chose the woods based on the tone I wanted, I decided on the wiring, had pickups wound and sent, chose the finish, the neck carve, all of that. Guitar is amazing and exactly what I wanted.

Boom, Done! My first Dream Guitar.

 
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JHL

Member
Messages
115
To those who have bought their dream guitar, how did you feel in the days, months, and years after?
It wasn't a "I've been dreaming about this forever" dream guitar, more like "I really want a good instrument after all these pretty good ones". But yeah, 8,5 years later I've been playing more than before getting this guitar, getting lessons and actually developing a bit as a player, and I'm enjoying the instrument every time I play it. Almost cured my gas, I've just bought one electric guitar after acquiring this, and pretty much any time I get to play any new to me fancy brand guitar, after a few minutes I think I to myself I like my current guitar so much more, why bother. So I feel good.
 

enharmonic

Old Growth
Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
9,049
It’s an interesting question. I’ve found that my dream guitars have ended up staying with me in various forms over the years, and that it’s not about the specific guitar, but all of the design components that make a certain style of guitar its own thing.

The only itch that I’ve never been able to scratch is the Strat. I played my best friend’s Silver Sky over the summer, and that’s about the closest I think I could get to a “dream” version of a Strat.
 

Stinky Kitty

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
4,339
I wanted this particular builder because I really love his design.


Very nicely done...happy you found him/her. For me, I'm more of a super strat fella. Most builders will get me 80% there but there still are compromises made. It's why there are so many pre-owned Kiesels for sale....all custom builds. There might be someone out there that can do it for me but more often than not, I'm required to use their designs and their choices of hardwoods or hardware with limitations based on their CNC programming.

If I could find a builder that would be willing to use my own body design and choices of woods, hardware, etc; I think I could get closer to 100% but only if upon receipt of the instrument, I would have the option of returning it for whatever changes I felt needed to be made. I'm not sure a company like Halo, for example, offers that level of service. For me, a true custom instrument is one that is built with no limitations in getting to the final result. If it takes three return trips back to 'em to get the neck carve just right, and they're happy to do it, that's probably a "hand shake, here's my deposit" scene right there.
 

joebloggs13

Member
Messages
3,781
Yeah "catch and release" seems to be the theme of many TGP emporium ads - "dream guitar, just bought it 3 months ago, best ever, need to let it go because i just found another holy grail for sale."
My ES-335 will never be sold, nor will I need to add another one. The guitar is perfect. As for other types of guitars....Well that's another story. One semi hollow, one hollow, one Tele single coil, one Tele p90, one Strat, you get the picture....:beer
 

Mad Wombat

Member
Messages
1,636
It has mostly cleared up my GAS for guitars....well, that kind of guitar, anyway.
And it has raised my standards. Now when I go into a store and try stuff off the racks, my feeling is mostly, "meh, same old stuff. Nothing special here." The regular, mass-produced stuff seems uninteresting.

Unfortunately, my GAS has shifted to pedals and basses.
 




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