What happens to concert video footage?

Discussion in 'The Pub' started by BK Verbs, Jun 11, 2019.

  1. BK Verbs

    BK Verbs Gold Supporting Member

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    All the big shows are filmed these days for a Jumbotron. What happens to all that footage?
     
  2. Bluesful

    Bluesful Supporting Member

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    Is it actually all recorded?

    Or just fed live?
     
  3. HeyMrTeleMan

    HeyMrTeleMan Colonel of Truth Gold Supporting Member

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    I'm not sure, but I saw War in concert and they told us that nights' performance was being video'd for later release. I so desperately wanted to have that DVD but couldn't find it anywhere. I got in touch with their management and they told me they'd tell the audience that so the band would play their best for the cameras. Neat trick, with camera men and big equipment but no intention of actually taping.

    Too bad. It was an epic performance.
     
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  4. Rick Lee

    Rick Lee Member

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    i just wish VH would release an entire show from the '81 Fair Warning tour. We got a few snippets from the Oakland and Fresno shows, but there has to be more out there.
     
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  5. BK Verbs

    BK Verbs Gold Supporting Member

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    Seems like a missed opportunity. I was at The Gorge - Dead & Co show on Saturday. Lots of video recording for the big screens at the venue. With audio recordings readily available for nearly every show ever, I was surprised the videos were not out there.
     
  6. Bluesful

    Bluesful Supporting Member

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    It may not be 'recording' though.

    Could just be a live feed to the screens.
     
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  7. RunninWDevil

    RunninWDevil Member

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    Given the Dead’s penchant for archiving, I wouldn’t be surprised if there is a vault full of Dead and Co. video for possible commercial release sometime in the future.
     
  8. Naigewron

    Naigewron Member

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    Don't know if most of it is actually recorded, it's presumably mostly just fed live to the screen.

    But more than that, it's a matter of most artists not wanting to put out an inferior product.

    Even if the video feed was recorded, you'd also have to record audio. Recording a line feed from the desk will usually not give you great results, so most bands wouldn't want to release an official live video with that audio. So that means you'd have to do a complete multitrack recording, and then it would have to be mixed and mastered properly to make it sound as good as possible.

    So now you have a good-sounding live audio mix, but the video will look pretty bland and boring. The shots that work on the jumbotron in the context of the show will probably not make for a good live video most of the time, and they're often not great shots in the first place. So at the very least you'd have to record every camera feed to at least have something to choose from, and probably add a few more cameras too in order to get better angles of everything. But now you suddenly have to edit a whole bunch of footage to make a decent video to watch. Another hundred hours of work right there.

    So yeah, just releasing the jumbotron feed isn't quite as easy as it sounds, at least not if the artist wants it to look and sound anywhere decent. There's a reason live video shoots are planned and announced months in advance - It takes a lot of time to plan out and set up even the most modest of live video shoots to make it look and sound ok.

    There are a lot of bands that archive their shows with a line feed from the desk, and some of them probably also record the jumbotron feed, but in 99% of cases it will never see the light of day, except possibly in short clips from a tour vlog or something.

    Edit: As for Dead & Co - They're a very special kind of band who completely embrace every aspect of live recording. Bootlegs, desk feeds, whatever. So out of all the big bands out there, they're probably the most likely to release a jumbotron feed with desk audio and be perfectly fine with it.
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2019
  9. Madsen

    Madsen Member

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    Occasionally this kind of stuff pops up on YouTube & other streaming sites.
     
  10. MrSteve

    MrSteve Member

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    I can help you out with Van Halen in 1982. There are a number of Jumbotron recordings from the Capital Centre, first arena in the U.S. to have one.
     
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  11. Old Possum

    Old Possum Member

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    Such as shame we don't have more video of the rock bands from those days.
     
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  12. BK Verbs

    BK Verbs Gold Supporting Member

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    Seems like the musicians are leaving money on the table in an era where revenue from actual music sales is almost non-existant. Video is such a dominant media these days and everyone is looking for meaningful content. For example, I’d definitely pay to rewatch the Lucas Nelson show I saw last night. I think a lot of his fans outside of NYC would too.
     
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  13. chillybilly

    chillybilly Member

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    Agreed, and in various threads bemoaning the use of camera phones (or is it phone cameras?) at gigs I have suggested offering ticket buyers the opportunity to buy (via stream or download) a decent, stable video of the gig with decent, stable audio. DRM might be tricky but then it's tricky already where music and film are concerned. Let's not let the perfect be the enemy of the good, as they say. At the very least it might encourage the crowd to enjoy the show without holding their phones up, without the silly little game of cat and mouse where security are concerned, and without annoying the artists who decry the use of phones.

    Bad sound? Off night? Broken string? Make that particular gig unavailable and offer a copy of the previous or the next gig to ticket buyers.
     
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  14. BK Verbs

    BK Verbs Gold Supporting Member

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    Well some of the live feed footage from Saturday’s Dead&Co show has popped up.

     
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  15. Motterpaul

    Motterpaul Tone is in the Ears

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    I would say this is the most accurate answer - except for one thing. These days it is incredibly easy and cheap to record and archive audio and video - you can store a 2 hour video HD show on a 128 GB SIMM card. It is true that you generally do want multitrack audio for each show but splitting the feed going to the board and running it into ProTools is also incredibly easy. In a concert situation everything is miked, so the only difficult part is looking at all the footage and deciding where you want to spend money on post production mixing.

    I have tons of "concert" video footage just from using a decent Zoom stereo camera. I am guessing the main reason there is not more is that it is hard to make real money from it. There is so much concert footage on YouTube these days that is free, that the best probable alternative is to make something for MTV or Netflix. And the demand there is limited.

    I am guessing there is also something of a fear of cannibalization of sales of concert tickets - depending on the group. I did go to see Slash & Miles Kennedy after seeing them on Netflix because I was surprised at how good they were. But a lot of other bands, I think of Steely Dan where the live shows are consistent but not exactly groundbreaking, they might feel there is more money in the novelty factor of the live show.

    20 years ago was different - audio was not yet all digitized and taking a protools rig to a concert was a little harder. Video also was not so easily stored (you needed multiple hard drives) if the audio was recorded in analog (common in the 80s/90s) post production was very complicated involving SMPTE signals striped on the audio and the video.

    It is only in the last 10 years or so that digital storage has gotten ridiculously cheap and stable.
     
  16. alivegy

    alivegy Member

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    In one of their fan club “deep” magazines pearl jam had a long article detailing the evolution of the process for recording and distributing their live shows. It’s a good read.
     
  17. tonyhay

    tonyhay Member

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    I can't imagine recording it would add much to the cost. One HDD per show, big deal. One band I play with records audio from every show from the mixer, and then puts it onto Box so that we can all hear it whenever we want. Video goes up there when we can get it. It's trivial in terms of the cost and effort.
     
  18. Rogan1990

    Rogan1990 Member

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    There's a website called nugs.net that shows a lot of that kind of footage. It's a subscription site, but if you like streaming Live concerts, it's pretty awesome!
     
  19. Throttleneck

    Throttleneck Member

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    Not video but I was at a Willie Nelson concert 5 or 6 years ago. They recorded the whole concert - if you paid a fee beforehand you went to the back of the concert hall after the concert and picked up your audio recording on a USB bracelet. It was pretty slick.
     
  20. 67blackcherry

    67blackcherry Supporting Member

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    Apparently, they (Oakland) only filmed those three songs...and we, the fans, have been bitching about it ever since they first aired that footage on MTV.

    The Largo MD show is very good, I’ve had that dvd forever...the band sure was on fire back then and it’s easy to remember why EVH was the king!
     

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