What I love about modeling amps:

paulg

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
3,007
I thought I'd start a thread to share some observations that were unexpected. Please share if you like:

1) They are a great cure for GAS. I've been jonesing for a high gain amp for a while. Now I have a bevy of them in my Mustang III, but I still use the mostly clean or crunch amps. Right now I don't feel the need to buy any amp or pedal. Reverse wah...got it!

2) Unlike a tube amp, you can boost the bass without getting mushy.
 

Pietro

2-Voice Guitar Junkie and All-Around Awesome Guy
Messages
16,442
You can also switch between a Bassman and a High Gain ENGL monster with a footswitch... and without spending thousands of dollars...

...and you can actually REMOVE the "amp in the room" from the equation if you want!
 

tweedster

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,066
You can get amp grind at conversation levels.

This sealed the deal for me, and i was looking for this solution for a long, long, time.

From master volumes,fuzz boxes, ART Power Plant, Tech 21, POD, etc. They all sucked. Fizzy sound, mosquito sound, gnat sound.

It came together for me with the Axe-Fx Standard @ firmware version 5. I'm on version 11 now, and on the waiting list for an Axe-Fx II. I'm looking forward to the Axe-Fx II more for the ease of use/interfaces than the new improved sound.
 

DarrenTD

Member
Messages
841
It made my GAS less expensive I guess. I really got into modeling with an Axe Ultra a few years back, and it did cure my GAS for buying any more high end amps. The last amp I bought was back in '07, and I used to buy one or two every year. However, my GAS for modeling has increased. In the last year I've purchased multiple Line 6 products, DAW software, FRFR system, and plan on eventually getting an AXE II and a Kemper. Apparently I still have GAS. It's just been refocused...:rotflmao


Disclaimer: I do have to say that I did plug into my old Triaxis rig today for the first time in a very long time and cranked it up..... it was GLORIOUS!!:p
 

shasha

Member
Messages
1,207
I've got 70+ great amps, tons of killer effects and almost unlimited cabs all in a 3RU box and I can crank it all up through a pair of headphones if I want to play at 2AM.

If I want to record something I'm already plugged into the computer, if I want to play along with a song I can mix it extremely easily.

If I hear something that someone else recorded and I love the tone I can ask to download the patch.

But the main thing is that I would never own a fraction of the gear needed to do what I can with my little box of noise in real life. I always laugh when people talk about how expensive it is, but I point out that just one decent amp, a cab and a couple of pedals would cover the cost and I've got about 100X the versatility.
 

eriwebnerr

Member
Messages
2,765
1) They are a great cure for GAS.
This is true. Especially if people take the time to evaluate some of the pedals and amp models they may have quickly dismissed. I worked my way thoroughly through all of the drive pedals on the G3 and it cured my desire for another OD.
Generally a lot of thought goes into the models and you can lose out if you don't dig.
 

mattball826

Senior Member
Messages
20,810
great for form factor and quality sound emulations (not at all a tube amp+ screaming cabinet, or like nice solid combo though). very few emulations are like the real amps reaction or sound imo. as many say here though. good enough. to me good enough does not mean alike.

it is not as good as my tube amps yet, (ymmv) and i have tried or still own near all modelers out there.

what kills it more ime is amplifying it. how many different pa and other rigs are we going to buy to make this work. every year its "this is great" only to be replaced by the same "you gotta hear this amplification rig" a few months later.

gas is not ended with modeling. for me i spend more amplifying it, buying interfaces and accessories, etc.
 
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Pietro

2-Voice Guitar Junkie and All-Around Awesome Guy
Messages
16,442
They are the future. In 20 years no one will know what a tube is.
You do know that people have been saying that about one or another non-tube technology for almost half a century, right?

That said, I'm recently, finally, officially tube-less...
 

MKB

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
8,494
If you have one of the really versatile modelers, and you learn to use it properly, you can quickly dial in almost any tone you need at a given moment. Too sweet. In a cover band or studio application, this makes up for the lack of tube tone.

In practice last week the band decided to play "Boogie Oogie Oogie", and I needed to quickly get that thin fuzztone sound for the solo. I have never used fuzzes, but was able to dial in the tone in seconds (jet fuzz into an eq). The band was blown away.

I still dearly love my Marshalls, but have gigged exclusively with an HD-500 for the last year (with different FRFR's).
 

mikeyen

Member
Messages
79
1) They are a great cure for GAS.
Ah, wouldn't that be nice if it completely cures GAS, but as with any high tech gadgets, there's always the allure of the latest and greatest version. For example, the only thing that's better than an Axe II is an AXE III that sounds just as good, but is the size of an ipad, runs on solar power, and makes waffles between sets!!!

Further, you can always upgrade any of the accessories such as the carrying/rack case, midi controllers, power conditioners, studio monitors, frfr monitors/amps/cabs, monitor stands, guitars...etc etc etc.

Mike
 

stratzrus

Philadelphia Jazz, Funk, and R&B
Gold Supporting Member
Messages
21,926
They are a great cure for GAS. I've been jonesing for a high gain amp for a while. Now I have a bevy of them in my Mustang III...
My gas is almost cured but I want one more tube amp, the upcoming PT 100 with MIDI, and then I'm done.

While the Axe II really meets all of my needs, really exceeds all of my needs, sometimes an amp starts calling your name and will keep calling you until you have one in your hands.


I wanted the PT100 before I got my Axe II and still want one, but have had no desires for any new amps since the Axe II arrived. I really haven't played through anything but the Axe II in a good while now. :)

My dream is to use them both with the 4 cable method. At that point, there's a good chance my gas will be cured too. ;)
 

JohnSS

Member
Messages
932
They are great for recording and gigging once you have taken the time to program the sounds that best match with your respective guitars. Modeling amps get a bad rap from tube snobs because they aren't "plug and play" and many musicians are lazy about having to tweak and write down programming levels for EQ & DSPs for each guitar to get optimum sounds. Different pickups, woods, etc. all enter into the equation, since the modelling amp has that many more variables than a Marshall, which really only sounds like a Marshall.
 

paulg

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
3,007
Since I got the Mustang III for X-Mass, I've been using it almost exclusively. I have a gaggle of tube amps, so it was time to do a little unscientific A/B test. Well, the tube amp had a great thick harmonic grind that's intoxicating. Yes, the sound of Rock! When I started to fiddle with the knobs, it came to me, it's still the same amp. You get spoiled with so many options on the modlers. I'd love to try a Kemper!
 

C-4

Member
Messages
13,927
I have always loved my all-tube amps. However, I have always tried to be flexible in my thinking towards gear. Everyone hears things differently, so one person's choice of modelling amp is not necessarily another person's choice. I have used as a small venue amp, a Vox Valvetronix, and been very happy with it. However, after reading up on the Marshall JMD-1 series, I tried one finally and it really does a beautiful job.

Soft Tube from Sweden did all of the modelling work, and the amp has a regular Marshall power amp section with a PI and EL-34's. I'm happy that it only does Marshall sounds, rather then try to be all things to all modelling amp players. It really feels great and has just enough effects to cover the necessary things, like delay, reverb, modulations and noise gate. As with the AXE and Kemper, to play a modelling amp through a guitar cab, one would normallly use a power amp. AXE FX's match up with the Atomic cabs, which have the power section there. Marshall, I believe, did the right thing by including their own power amp section with the digital preamp. The amp really does Marshall sounds extremely well, and the power section gives the tube feel that some feel is always lacking in a digital preamp. Being all inclusive in a typical Marshall head makes hauling it to and from work, really easy and offers a fast setup and breakdown. It also has all the extras one desires in a guitar amp on the back of the amp.

With these two amps, one can cover a lot of territory, at a reasonable price. While there are other all tube amps that I would like, at least I can cover the work I need to do without lacking a variety of useful tones. I cannot believe that Marshall discontinued the JMD series, and cut the prices almost in half for new ones. However, I am happy that I waited just long enough to try one after the price reduction. For the money, this is the best feeling modelling amp I have played.

The Fender Mustang is a nice amp, but, to me, lacks the feel of the Vox, and defintitely cannot keep up with the feeling and sounds of the Marshall. While all three of these modelling amps are far less expensive then an AXE FX, or a Kemper, unless I was going to go strictly digital for my amps, I find these lower priced alternatives to be just fine.
 

aleclee

TGP Tech Wrangler
Staff member
Messages
13,330
It's like bringing the studio to the gig and listening through monitors like the control room.
For better and for worse. In an ensemble situation, having one amp "in the room" and one amp "in the control room" can be a bit incongruous. I get what you're saying, though. I don't particularly miss "amp in the room", myself.

While one can get GAS for controllers, FRFR, etc, I see it as a bit different. GAS for amps, pedals, etc. generally involves getting a different flavor of a tone while GAS in a modeling rig more often revolves around sound quality, ergonomics or convenience. I upgraded my LF Jr to an MFC because it had more buttons and integrated more easily with the AxeFx. I went from an HPR122 to a pair of K8s because of the more convenient form factor.

The reason I think the distinction in GAS drivers is important is because it's easier for me to say "enough is enough" with functionally-based GAS. While I'd love to use the Jaytomic cabs, the reality is that my K8s sound great and I'm happy with them. The LF+ stuff looks cool but I really like running ethercon instead of MIDI cables from my rack to my board. Unless I win the lottery, I'm not going to be eager to get headphones that are "better" than my Beyers.

I guess what I'm trying to say is that going digital wasn't the end of GAS for me but it changed the nature of my GAS such that it's quite a bit more manageable. :)
 




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