What if only one band member wants in-ears?

jerryfan6

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
5,557
I'm thinking of moving to in-ears so I can save my hearing and my voice(I'm a main vocalist). I don't think the rest of the band would be interested in making this switch. What do I need to think about if I were to be the only one with in-ears?
 

MLG Audio

Member
Messages
1,039
Tons of different scenarios and solutions here.
Do you run your own sound?
If so, do you have individual monitor mixes?
Do you play venues with in house sound where you would also like to use IEMs?
Is every instrument mic'd for every show?
Do you need wireless?
Have you ever used IEM's before? (singing in a closed off environment can be very jarring for first time IEM users)

I'm sure others will have good questions as well that can help us reach a conclusion.
 

jerryfan6

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
5,557
We never run our own sound. We have a sound guy we use, but occasionally use the location's sound guys.

I'm not sure everything is always mic'd, participatory the bass and some of the drums.

We usually have our own mix per floor monitor.

I used IEMs for rehearsal a few times a long time ago. Didn't really give them a chance, but yes, I understand the challenge. I recently bought some ear plugs, and thought those might be an easier solution.
 

Otto Tune

Member
Messages
3,852
The sound guy may want to add an ambience mic so you can hear some room/crowd noise also.
You'll still want the monitor, just in case the wireless is a problem.
It's one of those things that once you use it, you'll understand more of what you need.
Since you don't do your own mix, you'll need to dial it in every time.

I was at an outdoor concert watching Beth Hart, and during a song, she'd just add, "More piano".
 

PhilF

Member
Messages
568
It can definitely be done. Sometimes it's easier than others. Be prepared for a little push back from the sound guy. Either way it should be similar to running a stage monitor.

It certainly differs depending on scenario

1. You are in a cover band that's playing by themselves or with 1 other band in a night and you are playing long sets. Generally much more time for setup and sound check. This is a much easier scenario, and as mentioned it would just be treated like a wedge mix for the most part except for you generally need more things in it, everything should be mic'd, blah blah blah.

2. You are in an original band (or cover I guess) and there are 4-5 bands on the bill and everyone gets 30-45 minute sets except the headliner. This is where it gets a lot more difficult. More often than not the sound guy is gonna give an attitude, and its gonna take longer to setup even though its just 1 IEM. Be prepared to lose a little set time in this case.

3. I'm currently only playing in one band, and it's a Muse tribute. Myself and the drummer use IEMS (me mostly because I use vocal distortion and a click and cues for the drummer), and bass and synth use wedges. We often get an hour or a bit more for a set, and play with 1 or 2 other bands in a given night. It's kind of in the middle of the 2 mentioned above. We don't run sound, we use the venue's sound person. I play guitar and sing lead, and I try to be absolutely as flexible as I possibly can with my mix. Granted, I've been lucky that I've never needed a perfect mix to perform confidently. This helps a ton. We sound check like any other band would except the ears usually take a bit longer to dial in than the wedges.

We also try to be absolutely as helpful as possible from sending the venue a stage layout/input list in advance, bringing one with us, communicating with the other bands for possible equipment sharing (hopefully at least drums), and generally being courteous to the sound guy. This may sound like it's off topic, but all of that helps us get better mixes, quicker, almost every show.

O, and with regards to the general notion that you have to mic every single thing I disagree. I have my vox and guitar very loud, and then the bass, synth, kick, and any other vox in my ears. Drums will spill through all the other mics on stage. Especially cymbals.
 

bob-i

Member
Messages
8,762
I do it. When we don't mic everything I use an ambient mic so I can hear everyone else.
 
Messages
164
We do it...singer just switched to IEM...he's got his own mix from one aux send which is pretty much all him...our vocal mics pick up a little ambience. His buds aren't high end...they also allow a little outside noise in. Seems to be working so far.
 




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