What is CAGED?

Discussion in 'Playing and Technique' started by drfrankencopter, Jul 31, 2006.

  1. drfrankencopter

    drfrankencopter Member

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    Guys,

    I've seen it mentioned a few times here about learning the CAGED system? What is this? Is it learning to play in the key of C, A, G, E, and D (all seem like pretty popular guitar keys)?

    Thanks,

    Kris
     
  2. jordanL

    jordanL Member

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    Its learning the chords and scales based on the open position C, A, G, E, and D chords, then applying those shapes all over the neck. For example a 5th fret A chord is the E form moved up the neck, a third fret C is the A chord moved up.
     
  3. Flyin' Brian

    Flyin' Brian Member

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    As I understand it from Joe Pass vids' its a way of looking at the fingerboard by starting in the open position and playing all of those chord shapes, then playing the shapes all over the fingerboard. The shapes remain the same but the chords change and it helps you to look at the fingerboard as one entity instead of disconnected positions.
     
  4. gennation

    gennation Member

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    You can search "CAGED guitar method" on google.com and get everything you need to know about. It's really nothing more than logically mapping out the fretboard to help with memorization and seeing how thing connect on the fretboard.

    Beside google'ing you can get the book Fretboard Logic. It's not the greatest book per say but it's one of the more popular ones that teaches CAGED...it's got all the info, it's just a little unorganized for my taste.

    Joe Pass is a advocate of it, as is Arnie Berle, amongst MANY others.

    EDIT I should add though that it is a very usable method for learning the fretboard.
     
  5. Jon C

    Jon C Silver Supporting Member

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    wonderful system, even if you don't get all the fingerings down, I haven't, it's a great road map to chord shapes all over the neck and from there, associated notes & scales.
     
  6. drfrankencopter

    drfrankencopter Member

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    Ahhh...I see.

    I've gotten back into scales recently (after too many years of just noodleing), and have been learning pentatonics in all 5 positions (including playing in between positions), and extending those into the various modes of the major scales. I am finally at the point where I can see the chords inside the scale patterns(though I'm a little slow at it)...I feel I'm on the cusp of a revelation. Though, when I improvise with this new found information it doesn't quite sound natural yet....I figure that's a matter of practice though.

    I guess I'm kind of working at the CAGED system in a slightly different manner....

    Thanks,

    Kris
     
  7. gennation

    gennation Member

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    Yes you are...all those "postitions" of scales ARE the CAGED idea. If you visualize then on a sheet of paper you'll see all those chord, or fragments of them, inside the scale patterns walking right up and down the fretboard.
     
  8. yZe

    yZe Senior Member

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    Seems Like The Fretboard Logic guy took the CAGED ball and ran with it
     
  9. CNOTE

    CNOTE Member

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    drfrankencopter

    You are on the right path and gennation hit it on the head.

    Visualize the individual forms of the CAGED system. Detain them in your mind for contemplation. Cogitate on the different chord forms and and see how and where on the fretboard they display their notes within the C form, A form,G form, E form, and D form of the CAGED system. Understanding the successive steps of the process within the CAGED system are paramount to your acquisition of the concept.

    :AOK
     
  10. MusicGearGuys

    MusicGearGuys Member

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    IMHO, its the #1 way to learn the Major scales. Minor? Just move it 3 frets.

    Learn the Arp. and the root notes of all positions. Then you can also use them in Ionion, Lydian, mixalydian and so on.

    This system and the 5-7, yes I said 5-7 and not 1 & 1/2 pentatonic scale forms and your off and running.

    Gregory
     
  11. Pythagoras

    Pythagoras Member

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    Here are some other ideas for fretboard memorization:

    - Set a metronome to a slow click, then in ascending or desending order play the same note on all six strings (on beat). For instance

    E 12th fret. (6th string)
    E 7th (5th str.)
    E 2nd (4th st.)

    ect....... All on beat.
    This sounds easy but as the tempo increases it is difficult.

    Also learn to play on one string, take each string and get to know it. Kind of like a Sax player knows where each note lives on his horn.
    You can use modes or simple melodys, for a real challenge practice things in all 12 keys on 1 string at a time. I am not bragging but I have learned some Charlie Parker melodys on one string.

    This will balance out the more vertical approaches with a very linear (horizontal) handle on your fretboard.

    I think most would agree that the endgoal in fretboard practice is to get it out of our ears way.

    My experience is that each note on the fretboard has its own quality and character, in other words they may have the same name or value in a harmonic context but I experience them as having there own sound and feeling.

    Oh yeah and try a little sight reading (I know it hurts).
     
  12. e-z

    e-z Member

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    This is very much like the approach suggested by Mick Goodrick in his book "The Advancing Guitarist". I've just started getting into it and it really is an interesting way to look at learning the fretboard.
     

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