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What is it about "Hallelujah" that makes it such a beloved song.

Lucidology

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
27,348
Please hold your hate and overplayed fatigue comments
& think analytically about just why it's such an Internationally loved song…

Melody, lyrical content, etc … take these into consideration.

Personally I have to admit … that when the song is performed well, I'll stop whatever I'm doing and listen.
It never fails to touch my soul …
 

Neer

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
12,700
The lyrics, the chorus of which is one of the most widely used words of praise in the entire world. The chanting of Hallelujah in the chorus hits home with many, if not most people.

Think of Amen recorded by the Impressions. Same thing. You don't have to be a religious person to understand.
 

Lucidology

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
27,348
This version … all these guys … just kick my ass with this rendition.
Just luv, luv, luv this …

 

GCDEF

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
28,280
Some songs just reach something deep inside you and express things that you think or feel but don't know how to express yourself.
 

trebb

Member
Messages
481
Jeff Buckley's version is my #1 song of all time. Absolutely superb rendition.

I think the melody is what catches me the most. If done right (the exact opposite of this is Bon Jovi's version...), it's awesome.

Other great versions:
- Brandi Carlisle
- Allison Crowe
- Rufus Wainwright
- Phil Wickham



Check that version out if you guys haven't heard it. The guy is a KILLER singer. I think he's in Christian music otherwise, which I don't listen to, but his version is still awesome.
 

EricPeterson

Senior Member
Messages
48,875
The melody draws you in, but the lyrics are pretty great and clever and that adds some depth. The first time I heard it it sounded familiar, but also new. That is really hard to do well, Cohen knocked it out of the park.
 

Funky Monkey

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
3,422
First for me was Jeff Buckley's performance of it. Guitar, voice, melody. I didn't need to know the lyrics or understand them. Still don't. It was his particular performance of it that grabbed me. And no other versions do the same, so it isn't (for me) that it is a "beloved song" as much as it is a superb delivery by a musician I already liked.
Like that thing where Trent Reznor said something to the effect of Johnny Cash covering of "Hurt" transferred ownership of it to him. "Hallelujah" is, to me, Jeff Buckley's song.
 

misa

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
3,665
Melody and lyrics are strong and generally appealing, but I'm often captivated by the dynamics (like in the Jeff Buckley version).
 

Kiwi

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
4,084
Well, the melody: it builds and builds and build, and then releases. Could someone with a music-theory background explain it?

The fourth, the fifth
The minor fall, the major lift


and all that.

Then, the lyrics: Clear enough that you know what they mean, and vague enough you can interpret them personally.

(Rumor is that he's got 100 more verses written over the last several decades....)

=K
 

2HBStrat

Senior Member
Messages
41,223
I first noticed the song when our sound guy was playing it prior to the start of the gig. I thought a religious song was an odd choice for a pre-gig song, but something about the song stuck with me. After hearing it a few more times in other settings the song kept sticking in my mind, so I did some research on the chords and words and started learning it. I don't know if it's the uplifting sound of the chords, or the words, or both, but there's just something unique about it that draws you in.
 

chrisr777

Member
Messages
24,760
When I was at Ronnie James Dio's funeral Geoff Tate sang it. There was not a dry eye in the house. Sung with the pure emotion of that day it was one of the most powerful musical moments I have seen.
 

bgh

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
6,975
The melody follows and plays games with the chord progression (in addition to the harmony present in the chords themselves). Plus, the progression has multiple tension-release moments when give an end result of being extremely pleasing to the human ear.

On top of that, the words themselves are killer. It's the kind of song you can sing with your eyes shut.
 






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