What is the most transparent monitors?

Discussion in 'Recording/Live Sound' started by Guitar Slinger6, Jan 29, 2012.

  1. Guitar Slinger6

    Guitar Slinger6 Member

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    I am putting together a nice home studio. I am wanting to know the truest powered monitors up to $2,500.00?
     
  2. SteveO

    SteveO Member

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    I'm in the process of researching to upgrade my current monitors, and so far the Adam A7x seems to be at the top of the heap in this price range (about $700 each).
     
  3. wahfreak

    wahfreak Silver Supporting Member

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    I believe this is something you'll have to figure out for yourself. I audtioned 6 or 7 different pairs at my local music store. It was a pretty shitting room to try out monitors but I tried Mackie 624, 824, JBL series, Adams, Dynaudio etc.

    They all have there own character even though they all claim "flat response". Everyone's hearing is different and I needed something that was less fatiguing because of my tinnitus. I couldn't handle the top end on some of them. Some tend to image a little better than others also depending on wher/how you use them.

    The best thing (if you can) is to buy, try and return the ones you don't like. If you really commit to buying a pair maybe they wil let try them all at home.

    Add at least some mild treatment to your room first. It makes choosing a lot easier.

    I've heard good things about the Focal solo6 Be in that price range.
     
  4. KidArchitect

    KidArchitect Member

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    Neumann KH120 are what I'm personally saving to get.

    There are some good threads on the KH120s, Focals, Adams, AE, etc.

    Check on Gearslutz

    But yes - most important is room treatment. I would not say mild room treatment, I'd say go all out with room treatment. This is especially important if the room is a small boxy bedroom.

    And, since monitors are so personal, definitely see if you can try them in your space and work with them (or a couple different pairs) to see what works best for you.
     
  5. LSchefman

    LSchefman Member

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    In the $2500 range, I'd recommend the Genelec 8040As. You see them in lots of studios (including mine). However, there are lots of other monitors out there that are excellent if the Genelecs aren't your cup of tea.

    For a fraction of that money, the Neumanns that KidArchitect recommends are excellent; Neumann bought Klein & Hummel, a well-regarded high end German manufacturer to make these.

    The Focals are also wonderful monitors in several price ranges. Also, I'd take a serious listen to the JBL 4328Ps and 6328s, as the DSP room correction built into the monitors really works, and helps get the bass right in a less-than-perfect room. Great results with mine.
     
  6. scredly

    scredly Member

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    In that price range two very nice options from Focal: A pair of CMS 65 with the CMS sub or a pair of Twin6 Be. Both well reviewed systems. The CMS setup is on my wish list.
     
  7. Scott Whigham

    Scott Whigham Member

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    While I think the Adam A7 line is a great lineup, they aren't in the same league as some of the others listed here. If you have $2500 to spend all on monitors, then spend it - don't buy the Adams just to save money. If, though, you need to beef up your room, maybe spend $1000 on room and $1500 on the A7Xs. Maybe. Probably not though. :)

    This is something I see repeated over and over and over on the forums - because it's (pardon the unintended pun) sound advice. But the reality is that it's very, very difficult to do this and hear the speakers you want. In Dallas (where I live) I find it damn hard to go to audition the speakers I would want in that price range. I could find 1-2 sets at this store, maybe one pair at another store, but that's it. It's not easy. If we were talking about a $500-$1000 price range, then sure - we could do it all at one store. But there just aren't enough companies that have in stock the Focal, Event, Adam, Dynaudio, PMC, Genelec, etc lines all at the same time.

    In addition to the excellent suggestions here, I'd add the Dynaudio Air6s and the Event Opals.

    Lastly, don't be afraid to buy used monitors from a source you trust. A lot of fear mongering exists on the web about used monitors but, if you wade through and do your homework, you might find it will work for you.
     
  8. gtrnstuff

    gtrnstuff Member

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    again, your room and the placement of the speakers in the room are at least as important as the quality of the speakers.

    Knowing your speakers and how your mixes translate to other speakers/car systems/ear buds is the next step. Lots of major releases were mixed on Yamaha NS-10, a harsh consumer grade box with not much low end or power handling.

    In my less than perfect room I have JBL 4326. I double check the low end with Beyer DT770 phones.
     
  9. Sunbreak Music

    Sunbreak Music Member

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    True dat.

    I would suggest finding some smaller "I deal out of my house" folks or get some contact info for some distributor reps for certain lines. Many times they can get a pair to listen to, or arrange for you to get in contact with a studio that is currently using them.

    I've checked with Neve at NAMM about trying their new compressor, and was told they wouldn't have any demos until another production run, but "call this guy" who's in my area.

    Always worth a shot.
     
  10. Rex Anderson

    Rex Anderson Member

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    I have seen used Meyer HD-1's for about $2,500. Very good monitor speakers.

    Also look at used Genelec models.

    As others have said, the room setup and good acoustic treatment are just as important.
     
  11. TAVD

    TAVD Guitar Player Gold Supporting Member

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    I've been using Tannoy Ellipse for a few years now and love them.
     
  12. rokpunk

    rokpunk Member

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    Check out that Adams A7's. Great sounding speakers at a budget price.
    Pick up a pair of Yamaha NS10's also, to use as reference monitors.
    You should be able to get both pairs for less than your $2500 target.

    The BEST sounding that I've heard are the Meyer HD1's, but I don't think you'll be able to find a pair for $2500. Maybe used....but even used, I think they will be over your budget. Genelec makes some nice studio monitors also. We have a pair of 8040's, or 4080's (I can't remember which it is right now..), and they sound very nice as well. I personally like the Adams more than the Genelecs, but many of our clients who we record prefer to listen back on the Genelecs.
     
  13. Somniferous

    Somniferous Member

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    Transparent is a very relative thing. Really all that matters is to pick some monitors and get used to how they sound in your space (hopefully said space has room treatment or it's all for naught) I use ADAM A7s at home and I think they work great, but it's taken me about a year to fully get used to them, which I think is normal for most monitors.
     
  14. vicdeluca71

    vicdeluca71 Member

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    Interesting,,,do they calibrate themselves?
     
  15. vicdeluca71

    vicdeluca71 Member

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    I see this a lot when discussing monitors and makes absolute sense to me,"learn" your monitors is essentially what your saying...So,if this is true (not being facetious here) then why not buy the cheapest,most reliable,speaker available and "learn" the **** (literally) out of them?
     
  16. LSchefman

    LSchefman Member

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    I think there are a number of issues that speakers address, some more accurately and more easily than others. For example, let's say you learn your monitors really well. This generally means, you understand where the frequency anomalies are, and you can balance your highs and lows well on them.

    But you can only fix issues in your mix that you can hear.

    If, for example, your monitor is squashing your bass mimicking a compressor because the woofers and amp are at their operational limit and distorting at reasonable volumes, you're not going to be able to hear what's happening with the actual compressor you're using on your bass track. If you can't hear into the mix, you're going to have to guess at reverb tails, phasing issues, front to back depth of field placement of instruments, etc. If you can't hear a problem noise, or some anomaly on the recording, because the monitors mask or can't reproduce it, you can be SOL.

    It's like looking at the world with the wrong prescription on your glasses. You might be able to walk around town and find your house again, but you also might not be able to read a newspaper or magazine.

    It's easy to miss details in a mix on any monitor, even the best ones. But your odds are improved when you work on a good system. That said, there's nothing wrong with having something that's not a great system on hand to check your mixes as a secondary reference.
     
  17. RocksOff

    RocksOff Member

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    The reason to select good monitors rather than meh monitors is that you will mix better, faster, and have a better chance to have your mix translate well on most playback devices.
     
  18. loudboy

    loudboy Member

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    I've got Focal Solo6BE's and I like them a lot. They're about $2200 or so...

    I think the Twin's are $3400?
     
  19. KidArchitect

    KidArchitect Member

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    Correct.

    I've tried using my crap monitors (M Audio BX8s) for the past 5-6 years.

    I've learned all I can about them, in different rooms, my most recent room is well treated.

    None of my mixes translate well. I can get a decent mix out of them, but I have to reference check every mix multiple times on multiple systems and it takes a long long time to get a final mix im comfortable with to send to a mastering engineer.

    And dont even get me started on using them while tracking. I can't really trust many of my tracking decisions, mic placement, etc. So i try referencing initial tracking of drums and such AFTER on other systems, but it's such a waste of time and effort...and if something isnt right, i have to spend extra time during the mix to things right...or worse...have to re-call musicians and get em back for another take...luckily, that doesnt happen as often as it used to...but still...

    So, getting a solid pair of monitors you can trust to make decisions on, in a well treated room, will do wonders for both tracking and mixing.
     
  20. 21stcenturykid

    21stcenturykid Member

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    As everyone else has already said, if you don't have a well treated room most of your money will be wasted. You can make a $500 set of speakers sound great in a good room but you can sure make a $2500 set sound awful in a bad room a lot easier!
     

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