What is the signature Lowden sound...

Discussion in 'Acoustic Instruments' started by Voxshall, Sep 19, 2008.

  1. Voxshall

    Voxshall Member

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    and what is the classic Lowden body woods and body shape for the Lowden sound.
     
  2. Dave Orban

    Dave Orban Gold Supporting Member

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    I had an O32 which is, I think the "classic" Lowden shape, with rosewood back and sides and spruce top.

    They are very light and lightly braced... the sound is VERY big and round, very piano-like in the lower register.
     
  3. nmiller

    nmiller Drowning in lap steels Silver Supporting Member

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    Absolutely. I have an F-23, and every string is crisp and clear, with good definition in chords. There's a good balance across the frequencies.
     
  4. Voxshall

    Voxshall Member

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    How do I choose out of the O12C or O25. I play with flatpick but want to learn more finger work I love blues playing as well.
     
  5. pedalcr8z

    pedalcr8z Supporting Member

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    My Lowden is a cannon! Grand piano like sustaining detailed basses, even mids and highs in sustain, tone and amplitude. It is so rare to find acoustics that offer even string response in tone, volume and sustain. Normally a larger bodied guitar would not be the best choice for intricate finger style but that's not the case with my 0-23 as it's every bit as capable finger style or using a pick. It's been said that perhaps slotted head 12 fret 000 sized models are the best for finger style and after owning both a Martin 000-28VS and a Collings 000-2H I would have to agree but when I first played the Lowden expecting it to NOT compete I was completely re-educated on what I THOUGHT was the norm. Lastly the oil varnished satin finish is just a joy as there is no stickiness and it's simply a sensual treat to touch and feel just as a finely finished piece of furniture is. It feels as though it's just been waxed it's so smooth but requires no maintenance at all as it doesn't show fingerprints. The 0-23 is Clairo Walnut and Western Red Cedar top with Sycamore bindings and ebony tuning keys.[​IMG]
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  6. royd

    royd Member

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    first he signature Lowden sound has been described pretty well I think - big, round, complex.

    I played an L25C (the same as an O25C) for 13 years which was stolen in '99. The Lowden folk built me a custom replacement that took 6 months to build. In the meantime, a friend loaned me an O10C.

    The guitars you're considering are similar with a rosewood/cedar and the 12 which is mahogany/spruce rather than the cedar top of the 10 I had.

    when I first got he 10, I wasnt happy with it. It seemed simple and boring, plus I really was in mourning at the loss of my guitar. By the time the 25 was due to arrive, I wasn't sure I could give the 10 back. When it arrived, I knew it was the one for me of the two.

    This is how I experienced those two guitars. The 10 was very direct, in your face, quick to respond. If I use a sexist analogy, it was like a Victoria Secrets model. One strum and WOW! The 25 is much more subtle, elegant, richer... to continue the analogy, think a classic beauty like Catherine Deneuve. After you play a little you say, "this is very nice," but as you play more it reveals itself and you realize that the beauty just continues to go deeper and deeper.

    For the 12, you also have the difference between the two top woods. Personally, I prefer the cedar but it does ding more easily and if you play very hard it compresses a little which you may or may not like.

    you can hear my two 25s at http://www.soundclick.com/bands/page_music.cfm?bandID=106838
     

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