What is this effect? (Blind Faith 'Had to Cry Today')

Discussion in 'Effects, Pedals, Strings & Things' started by fast ricky love, Jul 25, 2006.


  1. fast ricky love

    fast ricky love Supporting Member

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    Into the 2nd long break of Blind Faith's 'Had To Cry Today' there is an effect where the guitar sort of modulates in and out (the rest of the band stops playing) while they mix it so it pans... Is that a pedal effect I could cop or just studio trickery? I know it's not the most well known song on earth but hopefully some people out there have some good taste! :p
     
  2. radcliff

    radcliff Member

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    sounds like studio trickery flanging similar to hendrix's House Burning Down

    killer album!
     
  3. stratovarius

    stratovarius Supporting Member

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    agree

    and

    AGREE!
     
  4. JLee

    JLee Member

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    I always assumed it was just the way they miked/panned Clapton's Leslie.
     
  5. fast ricky love

    fast ricky love Supporting Member

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    Thanks gents!

    Here's another question: so would a flanger approximate that effect? If so, how different is a flanger from a chorus pedal? (Obviously I'm new to pedals! But I have a great chorus pedal already, so don't want to be redundant if the flanger overlaps too much...)
     
  6. Watsonica

    Watsonica Member

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    Without question, Clapton used a Leslie on that album and as has been suggested I'm sure that mic placement and engineering played an important part. The flanger, as a pedal effect not having been invented yet was accompished by a reel to reel open tape that was discovered when an engineer mistakenly placed his thumb against the "flange" of one of the reels (thus its name) and caused an out of phase or "jet airplane" effect.
    A modern day flanger could very well duplicate this effect as well as the sound of the Leslie rotating speaker if extreme settings are not used for the latter. Probably the intensity of either a flanger or a chorus would be a key factor in duplicating the sound but I would have to go with the flanger.
     
  7. trisonic

    trisonic Member

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    EC used a Leslie all the time at that stage.

    "Flanging" existed before the word Flanging was used (with all due respect to Ken Townsend - I shared an apartment with him briefly).

    Here's how it was described to me in the mid sixties by Michael Dacre Barclay of Decca to be used on a domestic tape recorder I was using then at home.
    Record the piece you want to manipulate. Blank off the erase head with a piece of smooth plastic. This way you can record and play back at the same time; as you do this literally wave a mic back and forth in front of the speaker - the changing distance makes the phasing effect. Doing it this way you produce the "Itchycoo Park" effect. In Mono! Stereo is way more problematic....

    Best, Pete.
     
  8. fast ricky love

    fast ricky love Supporting Member

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  9. gtrnstuff

    gtrnstuff Member

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    Brilliant!
     

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