• TGP is giving away a Strat, Tele, and Jazzmaster. Click Here for full details.
    Click Here to upgrade your account and enter today!
  • If you are seeing this, you are on the new TGP servers. Bear with us as we work out any issues related to the move. The end result should be a far better snappier experience on TGP. *Notice: You can close this notice by clicking on the "X" in the upper right corner.

what is your first choice for a multi-fx device for your acoustic rig?

edward

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
4,440
FWIW, I had gone from analog stompers to solely multifx, then back, and am now using both for my electric rig. My acoustic board is as you see, conventional, as it suits what I need it to do. My electric board has an old Boss GT3 that, oddly as it may seem, sounds and works great so long as you put it in "manual" mode so it acts like a stomp box and all models are off. I then supplement it with stompers; I get the best of both worlds with conventional pedals alongside it, especially dirt which has to sound and feel right!! So it is a hybrid board. Bigger than, say, an H9 on the floor, but not so big as to be unmanageable. And, of course, stupid-easy to mod on a whim.

If you want one board for acoustic and electric, then maybe AxeFX or Helix or the like really is your best bet, especially if you want good, dynamic dirt tone as I've personally found no digital dirt that is inexpensive really sounds good enough for me, and only the pricier modelers can sound and feel credible to my ears (at least I have not yet been impressed enough with OD offerings on the various multifx units I've heard/tried).

Edward
 

tiktok

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
22,579
I used a Yamaha UG Stomp for a few years. It sounded good, but the onboard tuner had problems reading the high strings on my K+K equipped guitars, and it needed a large AC power adaptor.

I also like the tc electronics G-Natural.

I've put together a variety of conventional pedalboards for acoustic--they're always larger, heavier and more expensive than any of the multi-effects I've used. I wouldn't swear that they sound better.

If I had to go buy something new tomorrow, I'd look at the Trace Metro.
 

feet

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
4,672
new travel rig by the photographic minority, on Flickr

here's what i generally use, since i don't require much. and this is all passive/battery powered, which is great. had i went with a multi thing, the trex was the clear winner for me. great sounds, parametric eq. don't care about chorus or loopers, but that reverb was beyond what everyone else offers. don't go for the digital band-aids as far as tone goes, either. if you can't fix it with eq, you're using the wrong pickup (or you can't use eq).
 

Tim Bowen

Member
Messages
3,483
I've attempted to simplify at several junctures along the way. I used a ZOOM A2.1u with the expression pedal for a few gigs. It did a respectable job as dialed back for moderation, and the modeling crap needs to be skipped entirely in my opinion, as has been mentioned already. My A2.1u has an issue powering up so it is shelved.

Ultimately I've not been able to get happy with Swiss Army Knife units. Radial and L.R. Baggs offer nice boxes, but there's always some sort of compromise that I don't care to work around with the do-it-all boxes, so individual stomps is where it's at for me. I want discrete boost and tuner for starters. I never seem to get along with EQ sections in DI boxes that have them, so the EQ winds up getting bypassed when the ability to do so is there (such as was the case with Tech 21 SansAmp Acoustic DI), or is completely useless for me when the EQ section cannot be bypassed (such as with L.R. Baggs Para DI). I want a quality DI when need arises, such as my Radial J48, but I don't want an EQ section in a DI.

I've done a lot of bench testing on the job at some of my more laid back acoustic-electric gigs over the last twenty years. All the dedicated acoustic-electric oriented processing gear is gone, and trial & error has had me settle in with electric guitar stomps for the most part. Ultimately, a board with individual stomps has wound up being the simplest solution for myself.

Two pedals that are absolutely indispensable for me have been Xotic RC Booster and Timmy. RC Booster serves as my master tone & volume for switching between several stringed instruments at gigs. I love that my RC can actually go below unity gain; comes in handy when I switch to my old Larrivee D-03 high-strung guitar, which has an early Fishman Matrix that has super hot output as compared to my other piezo and pickup systems, and the RC tames it. I attempted to use an Empress ParaEq w/Boost for a while. It was fantastic for dialing a single instrument to perfection and leaving it alone, but at least with me at the helm, was far too sensitive and time consuming for switching instruments live, which was my plan for it. So I went back to the RC Booster and haven't looked back. The only time the simple bass & treble controls on the RC weren't quite enough and I could've used a mids knob or additional EQ, was in employing a 12 string acoustic-electric guitar live. All other instruments have been fine. I generally don't have mids issues with A-E instruments live and have never had any practical use for notch filters, although I know how they work.
 

edward

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
4,440
Everyone's experience varies, but mine echoes Tim's above^^^

As I had mentioned in my prev post, I had been lured by the simplicity and "all-in-one" format of the multifx, I actually found individual stompers superior to the multi units for exactly those reasons, and discovered so in real live use. The primary shortcomings of multifx units for me are:

1. I do end up bypassing this and that because it's either a useless effect, or a given stomper does it better
2. the modular nature of indiv fx defines simplicity: add, replace, ditch ...all too easy.
3. the conventional board layout allows growth and changes; multiunit means you've got what you got. Forget about resale should your taste or requirements change; stompers well purchased hold their value and you can buy/try/sell with scant little loss, if any.

For me, the question can be summed this way: multi units offer the benefit of a small footprint; that's it. The conventional board really does work out to be simpler in use, and offers the user future-proof solutions.

Sidenote: I have yet to find a single do-all board for my acoustic vs electric setup. What Tim says about bypassing x or needing/not needing EQ is right on. And the obvious: my tonal/timbral requirements for electric are vastly different from what I need for my acoustic. If one's playing and music styles allow one to use the same board, so be it. For me, that'd be a big stretch. Sometimes, that lure of "simplicity" deceives since one small package does appear to simplify; but IME it's a false simplicity. Having gone that route and come back full circle, my experience says that for a genuinely simple setup-and-perform use, a separate board for acoustic and electric wins.

Edward
 
Last edited:

david henman

Member
Messages
3,144
...this absolutely reflects my experience. however, two things have been happening as of late. first, i find i'm relying more and more on amp tone (and becoming more and more picky about the amps i use, which could get expensive..) - i will probably go back to using the fx loop on my amps. secondly, i find that most of the subtleties of boutique delays, reverbs etc are lost in a loud band on a crowded stage. but rule number one for me is: always have a plan B. so, when the time comes, i'll buy a used multifx board, and hang onto my pedals until i'm absolutely secure with whatever multifx board i end up with.

here's another reason that a multifx board is attractive: years ago i forced myself to drastically reduce the size of my board and the number of pedals i use after watching a live video of me in performance staring down at the board during the entire set, solemnly planning my next move. this means i don't have a lot of pedals like a flanger, vibe, reverb, phaser, octave, fuzz, two flavours of mild overdrive etc. a multifx board would give me those options, no matter how rarely. on the other hand, i don't think i would ever be interested in any kind of digital amp/spkr/mic 'modeling'.

you make an excellent point regarding simplicity. at the moment i use a boss dd500, set up so that i have almost instantaneous access to however many delay settings i choose (i can even get a pretty decent chorus effect). thus, a multifx board would have to provide access to at least 2-3 delay settings on any given preset. if i discover that is not possible, i'll stick with individual pedals. i have owned a number of multi-delays and multi-mods - the eventide series, tc electronics etc. all were way above my pay grade. i never did manage to get even one usable setting. i did have a mobius for a while, but there was something about the tone of that pedal that i just couldn't bond with. either that or i just couldn't figure it out. at age seventy, i am somewhat old school.


Everyone's experience varies, but mine echoes Tim's above^^^

As I had mentioned in my prev post, I had been lured by the simplicity and "all-in-one" format of the multifx, I actually found individual stompers superior to the multi units for exactly those reasons, and discovered so in real live use. The primary shortcomings of multifx units for me are:

1. I do end up bypassing this and that because it's either a useless effect, or a given stomper does it better
2. the modular nature of indiv fx defines simplicity: add, replace, ditch ...all too easy.
3. the conventional board layout allows growth and changes; multiunit means you've got what you got. Forget about resale should your taste or requirements change; stompers well purchased hold their value and you can buy/try/sell with scant little loss, if any.

For me, the question can be summed this way: multi units offer the benefit of a small footprint; that's it. The conventional board really does work out to be simpler in use, and offers the user future-proof solutions.

Sidenote: I have yet to find a single do-all board for my acoustic vs electric setup. What Tim says about bypassing x or needing/not needing EQ is right on. And the obvious: my tonal/timbral requirements for electric are vastly different from what I need for my acoustic. If one's playing and music styles allow one to use the same board, so be it. For me, that'd be a big stretch. Sometimes, that lure of "simplicity" deceives since one small package does appear to simplify; but IME it's a false simplicity. Having gone that route and come back full circle, my experience says that for a genuinely simple setup-and-perform use, a separate board for acoustic and electric wins.

Edward
 

mikealpine

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
1,534
I have an Acoustic Fly Rig, I like it a lot. I bought an TC Play Acoustic, but haven’t hooked it up yet.
 

feet

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
4,672
i guess i went with a hybrid approach of sorts, because i have two separate all in one boxes. the zoom handles all the effects, noise reduction and any additional compression or specialized eq i may need. the fishman does pretty much all i need, but i didn't want their cheesy chorus and delay and such, so i went with the platinum pro, which gives me the comprehensive analog eq with all i want in that department (except color, but that's ok) and then i tacked on a passive di with a transformer to add some flavor and richness, but even that's a luxury and i could skip it.

luckily, i don't need a bunch of effects or loopers or modeling or irs or other digital band-aids. just a nice reverb. but everything is in that zoom, just in case (and both the fishman and zoom get used with my electrics, so win/win). two boxes and (recharged batteries) and i'm set. nice analog knobs that i can control instantly to adapt to whatever situation is at hand. no menus to dive through or extra hoops to jump through. tuning a guitar to a room isn't hard and busting feedback is pretty easy, too. i made a patch or two for the zoom to cover my electrics, and they are always on anyway, so its just a button press if i want delay, or noise reduction or the extra eqs. easy.

i'm also free from power supplies and weird converters and battery boxes and adapters and all that. i was all set to mickey mouse something out of battery packs that were strong enough to power some of the higher draw units before i went the other way and just got battery powered stuff. pretty happy with the system. i had rechargeable aas around anyway so that wasn't an issue, and i need a few 9vs for the guitars and such, and the fishman doesn't draw much power, so no big deal there, either. and when i'm at home i just plug them in if i want.

weirdly, i didn't like my rc booster with my acoustics at all, but that was an early attempt at eq, and not as a boost. didn't much like the ep booster, either. color was nice but the low mids bump was in the wrong place for acoustics.
 

gmajor7th

Member
Messages
118
Go ahead and laugh but I use a Zoom G3 and it's really good. I laughed too when I saw some threads 4-5 years ago suggesting the G3. The effects are really good. I use (not all the time) a bit of compression, reverb, delays (including tap tempo), detune/chorus, even an auto wah or filter sometimes to get silly. Rugged as heck, I've probably done 200 gigs with it. Runs on batteries if you need it to, which I have done in tiny spaces and/or where a quick setup is required. I usually run it into a Fishman Loudbox mini that I use as a monitor/DI, but I've also run the Zoom direct to the board with very decent results. I'm actually thinking about picking one up as a spare.

edit: I should add that you *have* to tweak the effects, as is common with must of these multi-boxes. Less is more.
I for one am not laughing...i love my Zoom G3 first version. I run direct to pa or Fishman Loudbox Artist. The G3 gives me all I need, and then some. Ive used for over 400 gigs over the last 4-5 years.
 
Messages
7
Hi,

it depends on what you need. I tell you, what I need: tuner, compressor, eq, reverb, sometimes delay. Means MS50G.

If you want to spend more money, get the TRex Acoustic Soulmate, where you have it all on the fly.

I don´t believe in all these bells and whistles with acoustic modeling. If you have to use an acoustic IR, check out the Helix HX or the new Helix Stomp.

cu

erniecaster
 

david henman

Member
Messages
3,144
...i am not a fan of acoustic modelling. horrid!


Hi,

it depends on what you need. I tell you, what I need: tuner, compressor, eq, reverb, sometimes delay. Means MS50G.

If you want to spend more money, get the TRex Acoustic Soulmate, where you have it all on the fly.

I don´t believe in all these bells and whistles with acoustic modeling. If you have to use an acoustic IR, check out the Helix HX or the new Helix Stomp.

cu

erniecaster
 

SupremeDalek

Member
Messages
732
It has been mentioned here, but I tried these multi-fx options early in my amplified acoustic journey. I really, really didn't like them. I wound up using regular boxes into my amp. My acoustic and electrics share the same pedalboard. I know it's sacrilege to some, but it works for me.
 

Jammin J

Member
Messages
4
I use a HX Effects in the effects loop of a Red Eye Dee Eye. Works and sound very nice, especially because I play electric to. I only have to switch presets to switch guitars, the one I don’t use mutes.
 

lp_bruce

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
17,845
I use a HX Effects in the effects loop of a Red Eye Dee Eye. Works and sound very nice, especially because I play electric to. I only have to switch presets to switch guitars, the one I don’t use mutes.
Recently I have been playing around with the HX Stomp using a Taylor 610 IR from 3 Sigma and it sounds really good.
 

stephenT

Member
Messages
2,407
Fishman ToneDEQ preamp. Analog. Great reverb, also has delay, tremolo (and other modulation effects) and a boost. Love the sound, very convenient.

 

lp_bruce

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
17,845
Fishman ToneDEQ preamp. Analog. Great reverb, also has delay, tremolo (and other modulation effects) and a boost. Love the sound, very convenient.
The marketing says it's analog, but it has parallel digital effects. So... is it actually analog?

Understanding that I really don't dare--I use digital and analog effects interchangeably and if it sounds good I really don't care what happens in the pedal. I'm just curious.
 

stephenT

Member
Messages
2,407
there's no springs and I have no idea if the reverb chip is an analog chip, but to my ears it's an excellent reverb, has none of that digital noise as the effect fades

The marketing says it's analog, but it has parallel digital effects. So... is it actually analog?

Understanding that I really don't dare--I use digital and analog effects interchangeably and if it sounds good I really don't care what happens in the pedal. I'm just curious.
 




Trending Topics

Top