What kind of body wood in early 60s Strats?

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by Kyle Ashley, Jun 8, 2008.

  1. Kyle Ashley

    Kyle Ashley Supporting Member

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    Just curious - what was the main wood type used in Strat bodies back in 62-65? Alder?
     
  2. jedistar

    jedistar Member

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    Mid 1956 to current: All models used Alder as the body wood. The ONLY exception to this is if the model had a "blond" finish. In that case, the body would was ALWAYS Ash. For example, since the stock finish on a Telecaster is "blond" (a translucent white color), all blond Telecasters are made of Ash. If a post-1956 Stratocaster was ordered in blond, it too would be Ash. To summarize, if the Fender instrument is later than mid-1956, and was originally not blond in color, the body wood should be Alder! Most alder bodies are 2 to 4 pieces. Alder trees do not grow "big", so multiple pieces were used for Fender guitar bodies. The number of pieces has little effect on sound or value.

    Source: http://www.provide.net/~cfh/fender.html
     
  3. Samba

    Samba Member

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    Although exceedingly rare, let's not forget the mahogany bodied strats that can be found during the first half of the 1960's. Here's Perry Margouleff's '63- he suggests it's one of the best Fenders he's heard. It's also worth bearing in mind that Fender dabbled with poplar from time to time during the pre CBS era, though I'm unsure if it was during the 50's or 60's. Perhaps somebody can chime in.

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  4. Kyle Ashley

    Kyle Ashley Supporting Member

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    Thanks for the excellent responses!
     
  5. EADGBE

    EADGBE Member

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    I've heard that the painted strats were alder and the see through finishes were swamp ash or regular ash.
     

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