What makes fatter riffage? Short delay or Chorus?

Discussion in 'Effects, Pedals, Strings & Things' started by BetterMeThanYou, Apr 27, 2015.

  1. BetterMeThanYou

    BetterMeThanYou Member

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    For riffing on the fat strings, what would thicken the tone more? Say your "straight"/"dry"/"normal" signal is panned to one side. I've read that if you run that signal through a short delay and pan it to the right side it will sound fatter. I've seen this with recording - that if you just copy one recorded track to a second track but offset it a few milliseconds and pan them away from each other, it "embiggens" the track.

    But doesn't it stand to reason that a chorus effect might be an even fatter option?

    Also I know adding an octave onto one or the other will definitely fatten things up. I'm wondering if you can get really big with all of the above.

    What is your experience?
     
  2. astainback

    astainback Member

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    Are you recording, or you need it on the fly?
    I love subtle chorus.
    I have the cosmichorus, and it does subtle perfectly... as well as just about any other chorus sound.
     
  3. DaveKS

    DaveKS Member

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    Pitch de-tuned down chorus is the king to me here, like a boss ps-5 with detune set a few cents down.
     
  4. drbob1

    drbob1 Silver Supporting Member

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    There are three basic ways to "embiggen" your sound. The first is simply to split to two different amps, preferably with different EQ curves. This gives you some time separation (you're rarely directly between the two) as well as different tones.

    The second is to use some kind of delay. On studio rack units from back in the day, you'd often see delay ranges (Flange 5-10 msec, Chorus 10-50 msec, Doubling 50-100 msec, Delay 100msec+ for example). Doubling was often used with little to no modulation, so it didn't give the swirl that a chorus would. Either will work, but if you use chorus, you want it set to a very slow rate, long pre-delay and minimal depth. You want the notes to sound heavier without the obvious modulation.

    The 3rd is to detune a little. This is also going to give a bit of a chorus type effect-detuning by 3 cents, for example, will give you 3 beats per second of added emphasis. Tuning down 3 and up 3 (a common studio trick) will give you a total of 12 beats per second, but some of them will be coincidental so a bit more chaotic sound).

    In the studio, folks will often use all 3 techniques: clone a track to L/C/R, delay the L and R tracks slightly (often differently), usually full wet (so there's not a delay effect) and then pitch shift the two tracks slightly. You could certainly do this using a delay, a pitch shifter and maybe a chorus.

    Also worth mentioning that, while reverb isn't often thought about as a thickener, it can provide another source of added impulses, especially if you're using exclusively early reflections (something that you can do with studio reverbs, not pedals). The old Yamaha FX500 had a great "early reflection" reverb that sounded like slap back when pushed, but just thickened things when used tastefully.
     
  5. BetterMeThanYou

    BetterMeThanYou Member

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    Well...Yes. Both.

    In other words, I want to record myself live, and I don't care if I have two amps in front of me, or two channels on a recording.

    I am kind of assuming that the same underlying principle works out to about the same thing, if you had two tracks panned L and R or if you have two amps one to your left and one to your right.
     
  6. heathyyy

    heathyyy Member

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    if you want to go down the expensive route, get a strymon deco
     
  7. BetterMeThanYou

    BetterMeThanYou Member

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    I almost always want to go the cheap route. I find bad sounding pedals charming.
     
  8. meowmers

    meowmers Member

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    Honestly you're going to experience phase issues if you duplicate the same recording panned to the other side and modify it using chorus and some delay. It will make it you sound more hollow due to comb filtering.

    This is why double tracking is recording the same part twice. The differences are in the nuances in timing makes everything sound bigger.

    This can also be done with a stereo chorus or any stereo modulating effects.

    Duplicating the same track twice or thrice in L C R isn't the most ideal thing to do
     

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