What makes your favorite guitarist your favorite guitarist?

Bickford

Member
Messages
98
I'm sure none of us can choose just one, but what are the things you like about some guys that puts them near the top for you?

Right now I'm all about Luther Dickinson. Something about the way he makes something new seem nostalgic. All of his influences are there but you still get his point of view.

I also love trey anastasio for his ability to cover almost any style with such ease.
 

Headshok

Member
Messages
2,669
David Gilmour-not fast, not flashy but when he plays, emotion wells up and makes me remember good memories. I want to be able to touch people on an emotional level like that.
 

BADHAK

Member
Messages
8,907
Schenker
Blackmore
Page
Ian Moss (Cold Chisel )
Brian Robertson
Billy Gibbons
Angus
Clapton


What do they have in common besides Taste,Touch,Tone,Time ?? They all played NMV Marshalls for their classic stuff(an amp that,try as I might, I can not make work for me)
They all did their best stuff, IMO, in the 70's(except for Clapton in the late 60's ) and all went pear shaped by the early 80's (for guys like Blackmore and Page even earlier)
Why do I love em ?? I just like that dirty but clean, blues based, melodic aggressive swagger these guys had. Not too smooth, not too technical,not too adult, abit of Jazz swing but not too much. Basic rigs that used the guitars controls for variety. Lots of dynamics,. Song based but able to stretch out.
But really it's impossible to nail down the reasons and none of them, with the exception of maybe Schenker, were able to maintain it for very long. eg..Blackmore , for me, lays down the utimate Strat tone, with the slinkiest, attitude laden phrasing on Made in Japan and then 4 years later lays down some of the noisiest, harshest tone ive heard coming from a Strat.....just a snooze inducing bloat fest on the Rainbow On Stage album.
 

Jahn

Listens to Johnny Marr, plays like John Denver
Silver Supporting Member
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28,776
Johnny Marr. When I was a kid he was my guitar anti-hero. I thought it was impossible to play this:


He just seemed so amazingly cool and accomplished.
 

Wyzard

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
1,917
Holdsworth: from the first time I heard him to right now, nearly forty years later, I haven't really had enough of a clue where his stuff comes from. Even his own explanations don't really help much.

Someone once said something about his solos hovering over the music like a vast alien spaceship; and that sounds about right, so I guess in the absence of actual aliens, he's as near as I'm going to get.


I'm sure there are some of you that won't listen to this stuff, but you have the consolation that he's out there - wherever "there" actually is - almost entirely on his own.
 

ant_riv

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
5,502
Schenker
Blackmore
Page
Brian Robertson
Billy Gibbons
Angus
Clapton

What do they have in common besides Taste, Touch, Tone, Timing?
They all played NMV Marshalls for their classic stuff.
They did much of their best stuff in the 70's.
Why do I love em?
I like that dirty but clean, blues based, melodic aggressive swagger these guys had. Basic rigs that used the guitars controls for variety. Lots of dynamics. Song based but able to stretch out.
Blackmore, for me, lays down the utimate Strat tone, with the slinkiest, attitude laden phrasing on Made in Japan.
I agree with this altered version of Badhak's post!

To me, it is the clean, driven NMV tone played with authority that still excites me when I hear it.
 

Dave Shoop

Member
Messages
11,255
Jeff Beck. He just always seemed to have a different approach to playing. His playing was always a surprise. His uniqueness.
Joe Walsh. Tasty licks and a sense of humor in his playing. Never was focused on playing the fastest or the most notes but has great phrasing and style. Always loved his tone.
 

TheGuildedAge

Member
Messages
13,068
Edge is my favorite, his melody and sense of dynamics and timing. I think the ending of With or Without You is one of the simplest yet most appropriate and beautiful pieces of guitar work out there. Most guys would take a big solo there, but he just hits those ringing dream notes, as he does on the outro of One.

Steve Clark from Def Leppard is another favorite, played some simple yet melodic notes to counteract Phil's shred.

Gilmour's phrasing is incredible.

Nick McCabe from the Verve of his atmospheric stuff.

I always thought EVH had a swing to his playing others lack, and his sense of rhythm is better than his lead work. Though his lead work is great of course.

Music is so subjective. Some of the guys named in this thread I can't stand, as I am sure some would say of my choices.
 

Astronaut FX

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
7,348
The ones I like most all share common elements. They demonstrate awareness that the guitar is just one tool, one element involved in the crafting of a song. And by recognizing that, they play what makes sense within the song, no more, no less. They put the song above their ego.
 

Rumble

Instrumental Rocker
Gold Supporting Member
Messages
2,509
When it comes right down to it, I think John Fogerty has impressed me more than any other guitarist over the years. He just owns the fretboard with the tastiest of licks, chording and just the right notes. He never needed a stack of Marshalls to get his point across with a guitar (no offense to Marshall stacks).
 

TheGuildedAge

Member
Messages
13,068
When it comes right down to it, I think John Fogerty has impressed me more than any other guitarist over the years. He just owns the fretboard with the tastiest of licks, chording and just the right notes. He never needed a stack of Marshalls to get his point across with a guitar (no offense to Marshall stacks).
You know what else about Fogerty, he's one of the few who seems to get better as he ages. He was doing some EVH tapping when I saw him live.
 
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11,782
Ace Frehley, for his tone and phrasing. He has no equal.
This guy answered for me.

While i love the playing of Holdsworth, Zappa, Diorio, Krantz, all the 80's shred gods/hair metal guys, Scott Henderson, etc, etc, etc, the simplicity of what Ace does and how it works in context of the song is still my favorite that i always come back to.
 

Nevets

Member
Messages
9,284
I've been taking lessons again for the past several months, and in learning and dissecting solos that I like and want to play, I've learned that all the guitarists I like play melodic solos often in the key of D.
 

Paleolith54

Member
Messages
3,254
I'm sure none of us can choose just one, but what are the things you like about some guys that puts them near the top for you?

Right now I'm all about Luther Dickinson. Something about the way he makes something new seem nostalgic. All of his influences are there but you still get his point of view.

I also love trey anastasio for his ability to cover almost any style with such ease.
Hmmm... if I had to pick one guy who pulled together into one package everything I like about electric guitar it would probably be Allen Hinds. I'm probably not knowledgeable enough to express why this is so in a clear way, but the way he blends influences/genres; his tone; his beautiful technique; his versatility; I can (and do) listen to him for hours and not get bored. A sort of "quick look" for those not familiar with him would be any of the stuff he's done at the Baked Potato.

From a pure "favorite" standpoint, I have always been a huge Martin Barre fan. Though I really like and listen to the others mentioned above, there's just something about Barre's approach and his tone that have always grabbed me.
 

rwmct

Member
Messages
2,809
I kind of think in terms of genre. B.B. King. Peter Green. Johnny Winter to rock it up a bit.

Mick Ronson.

Going back towards the beginning, Mississippi John Hurt. Frank Hutchison.

Doc Watson.

Current rock favorite is easily Mark "Sharkey" McEwen of Gandalf Murphy/Grand Slambovians. He has that late 60s British guitar god Les Paul tone.
 




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