What scale runs through an A+7

Discussion in 'Playing and Technique' started by bluesman, Apr 26, 2008.

  1. bluesman

    bluesman Member

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    I'm playing an A scale with a raised 5th and 6th, or I suppose it might be better to say with a b6 and b7. (A, B, C#, D, E, F, G, A).

    What scale is this?
     
  2. Clifford-D

    Clifford-D Member

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    You can find your answer for this and just about anything else here
    It's a powerful tool

    Choose the scale key, then scroll through the scales in a second box ( on the left)
    and keep looking in the third lower box (details), that displays interval structures till
    there's a match.

    I didn't xplain it well but it's easy.

    http://www.looknohands.com/chordhouse/guitar/index_rb.html.
     
  3. shigihara

    shigihara Member

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    A mixolydian b6.... 5th scale degree of D melodic minor...
     
  4. jb70

    jb70 Supporting Member

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    the chromatic scale will also work :)
     
  5. Lammy

    Lammy Member

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    Whole tone, Altered,
    depends on teh 9th, flatted or sharp is altered and natural 9th will be whole tone.
     
  6. fusion58

    fusion58 Member

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    Ding ding ding! :AOK
     
  7. JonR

    JonR Member

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    D melodic minor, as shigihara says.

    Lammy's two choices - wholetone and altered - are more "correct" (ie conventional) for an A+7 chord (A7#5), because it has a raised 5th. (A mixolydian b6 has a perfect 5th and minor 6th.

    A wholetone = A B C# D# E#(F) G

    The altered scale would also work, which uses both b9 and #9 in place of the major 9:

    A altered = A Bb C C# D# F G (= Bb melodic minor)

    To a jazz musician, the A mixolydian b6 scale is not ideal because it has an avoid note: D. (Sounds bad if held over the chord)

    However, there's no hard and fast rules here. Every note in the chromatic scale is usable - provided you understand how they all work with the chord. (That's how the above scale choices have evolved - they seem to work best in most situations.)
     
  8. bluesman

    bluesman Member

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    Thanks for the replies guys. Your answers got me to do some more digging around and discovered I was playing Bb melodic minor over the A+7 which I've come to learn is quite common - playing the melodic minor scale that is a half-step up from the chord, that is. Cool stuff.
     

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