what should i do. save up for another guitar or get a Marshall AD50?

Discussion in 'Amps/Cabs Tech Corner: Amplifier, Cab & Speakers' started by jeffrey827, May 11, 2008.

  1. jeffrey827

    jeffrey827 Member

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    hey guys. i'm not sure if i should get a Marshall AD50 which is around 400$ some of my friends told me that i should jsut save up for another guitar but i'm not sure if i should buy it. i need a amp with a mike jack for singing for my band but i'm not sure. are there any other good amps out there for under 400$ that has a mic. jack and a instrument and EQ? thanks a bunch. :)
     
  2. rooster

    rooster Member

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    Hate to tell you this, but that's not the approach you really want unless you're doing acoustic coffee-house stuff. If you are fronting a band, you guys need a good PA, good mics, and then a good amp. If you're over 16, I'd suggest getting an extra job, and working your a$$ off until you have the money for all of them, if you want to be the owner of the PA. Another word of advice, if I may; Don't have the "band" go in on the PA system, or everyone will get screwed when the band breaks up, which, judging from the way you phrased your original question, is most likely everyone's first band. I delivered papers to buy my first guitar, dug ditches and hauled gravel at 1/2 of the minimum wage at the time to buy my first amp.

    Count on about $750-1000 for a useable used PA system, about $75/mic if you can get them used, about $500-1000 for a good guitar amp. Don't buy something in the "medium" grade of equipment, get good, useable stuff, or you'll sound like crap.

    Also, keep in mind that the PA is not just the singer's rig, it's for the benefit of the whole band; without a frontman, NONE of you are playing. So, if you do decide to split the cost, have one guy buy the PA head (I'd suggest an all-in-one 8 channel with a power amp unit for budgetary reasons, or, a good mixer and some good rack gear and power amps for sound reasons -- you make the choice), one guy buy the speakers, one guy buy the cables/powerstrips/mics, etc.

    rooster.
     
  3. TweeDLX

    TweeDLX Member

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    +1 on that! Also, make sure you buy a PA rig with enough power to compete with the guitar amps and drums. If you decide to do the powered mixer thing, shoot for at least 250-300 watts RMS (don't get sucked in by any of that "peak power" crap!) at no lower than 4 ohms. That should cover most small to medium-sized venues. Check reviews at Harmony Central to get an idea of the quality your buying. Good Luck!
    :dude

    Mike
     
  4. jeffrey827

    jeffrey827 Member

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    ok. if i get a PA does that mean i also have to get one of those mixer things?
     
  5. GuitarsFromMars

    GuitarsFromMars Member

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    yup,that's what a powered mixer is about.As opposed to trying to buy all those separate components-mixer,power amp,eq,effects to start.
     
  6. Jef Bardsley

    Jef Bardsley Member

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    A $400 PA isn't really big enough, and too much money goes into wood and wire trying to make it look like a PA. If your budget is truly limited to $400, I suggest looking for a used keyboard amp.
     
  7. Crikey

    Crikey Member

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    Here are some other ideas. If you are talking about the Marshall AS50D acoustic guitar amp, I've seen some good deals for used Fender Acoustasonic Jr amps, which are pretty similar. You can find one for $200 if you are patient.

    What I did for a practice PA (would work for the scale of gigs an AS50D would work for, with probably more headroom) is buy a powered PA speaker with two mic inputs and a line input on the back. We run two vocalists and the keyboard into it. It's just loud enough to compete with the percussion in our Brazilian pop band. I got a really cheap one -- $190ish -- because I was attracted to the built-in dual mic inputs and XLR line-in. I didn't want to have to set up and tear down a mixer every practice. I got lucky in that mine (while it isn't as loud as I'd expect given the 250W rating) doesn't sound bad. I'd be tempted to get something nicer like a Mackie SRM450 if I were doing it again and had the cash to burn, but for the price what I got has done the job. It is called a GEM Sound PXA250 or something like that; it's a 15" two-way.

    I bought this strictly for a portable practice PA -- we've never taken it to a gig. The places we play have PA systems installed. But for any venue that an AS50D would cover, I think this would as well.

    If you have the cash, the higher end solutions suggested by others would certainly offer advantages in power and features. You haven't mentioned what kind of band you have, what the instrumentation is, your music style, or how loud you play, so all of the answers you are getting tend to be biased toward what we use with our bands rather than what you need for yours.


    Crikey
     

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