What single song taught you the most?

Discussion in 'Playing and Technique' started by Turi, Sep 9, 2014.

  1. Turi

    Turi Member

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    Sup fellas.

    I'm still noobing my way through Tunnel of Love by Dire Straits, and I've picked up loads of techniques from it.

    Was just wondering what songs other people might have learnt and thought "hey, I learnt loads from that song".

    From Tunnel of Love, I've learn a few different chord shapes, loads of extra stuff/licks to add to the minor pentatonic scale (the final solo seems really focused on position 1).. I've learn some really cool bends, a quick little scale run down..
    There's a part in both the first and final solos where he actually bends a note up, and hits a note on the string below as well - sounds really cool and it's not something I ever would have thought to put in my own solos.

    So many techniques in this one song, I feel like I've learnt more just from learning this song over the last couple days-week than I have in like the previous 8 years since I've been playing instruments.
    Crazy.

    The biggest thing I've learnt is probably phrasing. Each lick/line or whatever seems to have a definite "full stop" kinda deal after it, even when he seems to be playing continuously, he's not, there's definitely moments where it's almost like the guitar takes a breath or something.
    Even if it's only for a split second, it just shows to me I don't need to be constantly making guitar noise to write a solo.
    The start of the final solo is all about the space. Really have learn a lot.

    I'm definitely not saying I can play the song the same way he does, I'm just saying, this one song has taught me loads of techniques and licks and stuff, it's awesome.

    I'm half interested in what single song taught YOU the most new stuff, and I'm half interested in stealing those ideas and perhaps learning from the songs mentioned here (if there is any).
     
  2. Wansel

    Wansel Member

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    Sultans of swing.

    Purely coincidence that it's also dire straights.
     
  3. JonR

    JonR Member

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    I don't think I could nominate a single song in that way, but two that come to mind - that I spent some time on - are Undecided (Django Reinhardt's guitar solo) and All Blues (all the solos).
    I was kind of expecting, before I did it, that I would learn a lot about general rules of improvisation. In fact I learned nothing along those lines (that I didn't know already). What I did discover was those specific players' attitudes to improvisation, their musical personalities. Not - eg - how to approach a ii-V-I, but how each of them chose to approach it - on that day, on that take. That was a pleasant surprise - it felt like coming out into the light.

    And in fact I did take away a lesson about general rules: my instincts about those rules were confirmed, but it showed me that there were really no other hidden, more advanced rules that I wasn't aware of (that jazz teaching had persuaded me might be under there). All there was beyond the basics was personality. You learn a very simple set of basic rules - that anyone can pick up from listening, and from a very small amount of study - and then you're on your own with it.

    Of course, that's not to say that deeper study of particular players won't give you ideas you might not have thought of. Being on your own with it can get lonely! And it's important not to stop listening to stuff, because if you think you have it all down - nothing more worth studying - you end up in a rut. There's always more ideas to steal...
     
  4. corn husk bag

    corn husk bag Silver Supporting Member

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    Blues for Fred, the whole cd. Joe Pass.

    Steve
     
  5. omahaaudio

    omahaaudio Senior Member

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    Cliffs Of Dover taught me to just give the hell up.
     
  6. JonR

    JonR Member

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    Ha! Tunes like that just teach me not to listen to tunes like that.:)
    At least, I learned to stop imagining I might ever play them. There's a whole world of simpler music (too much for one lifetime) that's at least as enjoyable - dare I say more enjoyable?
     
  7. Cainer

    Cainer Member

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    :roll

    Highway to Hell by AC/DC - it was the first song I learned stem to stern (on a classical acoustic no less), by ear. There are far more complex songs for sure, but that one had to give me the biggest jump in learning how to play the guitar I'll ever have.
     
  8. GLB98

    GLB98 Member

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    Also an AC/DC one for me, Back in Black. I don't have it close to nailed by a long shot. But the intro lick, the rhythm parts, the leads, the vibrato, all caused me to really stretch my technique.
    I feel like if I could play all the parts to that song comfortably and reliably I'd be the guitar player I want to be. But of course if/when I get to that point, I'll be disdainful of where I'm at and be looking farther ahead.
     
  9. icarusi

    icarusi Member

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    'Natural Born Woman' and 'Good Morning L'il Schoolgirl' solos by Pete Frampton and E. Clapton resp. Arrangements would be 'Dreamer' and 'Ricky Don't Lose that Number' by Supertramp and Steely Dan resp.
     
  10. Caretaker

    Caretaker Silver Supporting Member

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  11. Flyin' Brian

    Flyin' Brian Member

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    I don't remember the name of the song, but it was an instrumental used at breaks by a lot of bands in the 60s.

    It was a blues in F and the band played some of the "jazz blues" changes instead of a plain I-IV-V, including what I now see as simple I-VI-II-V turnarounds.

    What I learned from it was the walking bass line, which was repeated through the entire song. Learning that pointed me in the direction of passing chord changes, walking bass and from that I started listening to jazz. The first thing I noticed how the 4/4 section of Brubeck's "Blue Rondo a la Turk" had a similar walking bass line that was appealing.

    That got me to the eventual theoretical knowledge base (no pun intended) that I use all of the time today, including knowing all of the notes on the fretboard and their relationship to their overlying chords.
     
  12. Cainer

    Cainer Member

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    lol - do you have the other half of this medallion?
     
  13. GLB98

    GLB98 Member

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    Ha!

    I confess I didn't get the reference (for some reason I wondered if it was something from Pirates of the Carribbean) so I looked it up. Pretty applicable.


    3 years ago (I've been playing for about 5) I would have thought the current me was a pretty impressive guitar player for an amateur. The current me is quite certain that the current me is a musical dufus and an imposter and this stuff I can do now should be doable by anybody with a pulse and 6 months of practice.
     
  14. fenderlead

    fenderlead Member

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    Hmmmmmm! hard to say but I'd probably go with Evie part 1 and Malcolm Young's solo.

    Other things were Ritchie Blackmore's solo on "Black Night" and Keith Richards playing on "Jumping Jack Flash" which is more complex than some might think, with multi layered guitars all playing their part.

    All of these things were when I first picked up a guitar and of course I've picked up lot's of other things along the way but these were the things I was trying to pick up things from when I first started playing and they all swing (or groove) in their own way and swing is one of the main things as far as I'm concerned.

    Things like Django's swing and phrasing and Charlie Parker's swing and phrasing also had an influence on me but that was later on.

    "It Don't Mean a Thing If It Ain't Got That Swing".

    I probably should have played drums instead of guitar.

    Harry Vanda (Easy beats and co-writer of Evie)

    "When Malcolm does play lead he is a special player. I'll give you an example, it was him who played the solo on the first part of Evie. That's me on part three. The only reason I'm doing what I'm doing on part three is to keep up with the young bloke!."



     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2014
  15. Flyin' Brian

    Flyin' Brian Member

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    See the second part of my signature.

    Metheny also said this...same thing you're talking about:

    You know... the frustrating thing is every now and then you actually do get it right. It might be every 4th night or every 10th night or every six months or once a year but every now and then you do it. And that makes it worse almost because it's like you KNOW you can do it, you KNOW that you're not crazy. It's there. There is a truth there that can be found. And I think each year that you play you become more consistent or you get closer to that truth that you establish in your mind. But as you get closer to it, it also moves at the same rate higher away from where you are.
     
  16. old goat

    old goat Member

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  17. stratoskier

    stratoskier Member

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    Room 335, Cliffs of Dover, and a piece from a Guthrie Govan lesson on how to play more chromatically. Not sure why that last one was so important, but it changed the way I think and play.
     
  18. Jeremy_Green

    Jeremy_Green Member

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    Boring answer but I'd have to say Smoke on the Water... Because it taught me it was possible to pick things out on my own.
     
  19. gigs

    gigs Member

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    Texas Flood, SRV. So much to learn packed into a single recording. It's got it all... technique, phrasing, timing, vibrato, tone, smooth transitions....
     
  20. JonnyQ

    JonnyQ Silver Supporting Member

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