What to study for grad school?

Discussion in 'The Pub' started by still.ill, Aug 21, 2014.

  1. GCDEF

    GCDEF Supporting Member

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    A marketing degree from a top business school should be a pretty easy degree to get a job with. From what you said you learned, it sounds a bit like you have something of a negative attitude, which isn't a good thing for a marketing person to convey. I'd be a little introspective and see if maybe I wasn't marketing myself very well. FWIW, my daughter just graduated with a degree in public relations, which I guess is similar and walked into a nice job right away. You really need to be persistent and be a go-getter. There's a lot of competition out there.

    As somebody with a masters degree in computer science, I'm going to say it isn't for everybody. If you're not good at math and logic, you're going to have a really tough time with it.
     
  2. still.ill

    still.ill Member

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    the only jobs available seemed to be 100% commission-based sales jobs where you basically had to phone people trying to make them give away their money for 10 hours a day, or knocking on doors.
    i'd rather go back to school than do that. lots of pyramid schemes out there too.
     
  3. lumpyadams

    lumpyadams Senior Member

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    Go into teaching.
     
  4. GCDEF

    GCDEF Supporting Member

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    Have you put your resume on Monster, LinkedIn, CareerBuilder, etc? Have you contacted a recruiter? Most communities have groups for local business people to get together. Look for them and hang out there. You're a marketing major. You should be able to market yourself. Those jobs you describe pray on unemployed people, but just about every business needs somebody in marketing. If you're not finding anything, it seems you're doing it wrong.
     
  5. A-Bone

    A-Bone Montonero, MOY, Multitudes Gold Supporting Member

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    What he said. Graduate education is great for people who go in knowing what they want to focus on, and it is notoriously ill advised for folks who go in hoping that it will help them gain that focus. One reason for this is because despite appearances to the contrary, graduate education is relatively open ended and more or less entirely self-directed.
     
  6. -alex

    -alex Member

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    There is grad school and then grad school - totally different things.

    If you are just looking for a new skill set, take the pre-req undergrad courses and get yourself a coursework masters. You can probably do this in under 2 years. You'll learn enough to be dangerous and be employable.

    If you are very passionate about a field, then the PhD route makes sense. You do this because you are slightly crazy but incredibly passionate. This is the path if you want to become a researcher and don't necessarily care about $$ or employment.
     
  7. jhc

    jhc Senior Member

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    Got them (MD and PhD) concurrently. Still, yeah, a lot of years
     
  8. -alex

    -alex Member

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    I've always enjoyed working with MD/PhD researchers. Although, just the sight of needles and blood pressure cuffs make me dizzy! I don't think I could do any clinical studies that involved interacting with people or animals.
     
  9. dysorexia

    dysorexia Senior Member

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    I was in the same boat as you. Well, I had a bachelors in business administration. I went further and got my MBA. I can't tell you how many opportunities I've had and I've worked in NYC and NJ. Now I'm in CT doing high level management in an insurance company. I'm here to stay while others are constantly being shuffled out.
     
  10. Rimbaud

    Rimbaud Tarnished Silver Gold Supporting Member

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    Whatever you do don't get an M.A. In English...it was cool when I was taking the courses, pretty smart women love a sensitive guy who can quote Shakespeare and write Classic Romance poems for them...after you graduate, it isn't worth Dooky...

    Now The only benefit is that I have a slight edge doing the NY Times Crossword puzzles.
     
  11. VCuomo

    VCuomo Member

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    :agree My thought was that if the OP had to ask what to study that maybe he shouldn't be going to grad school at all...
     
  12. VCuomo

    VCuomo Member

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    Impressive! :aok

    Now I gotta ask: Which one did you learn? :)
     
  13. Staggerlee

    Staggerlee Member

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    Get a job, work for a few years then decide to go to grad school. Id suggest an MBA. The top schools only accept you if you have some work experience too.

    I also assume you were too lazy or busy discovering yourself to do any internships with real companies while in NYC otherwise you would have a job. Thought so.
     
  14. Weathered

    Weathered Supporting Member

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    This sounds harsh, but I don't think it's completely wrong.

    I studied marketing in undergrad and worked for 3 years in a job that didn't really offer fantastic advancement before I got into a company that offered good growth. After a year there, I went back and got an MBA knowing what direction I wanted to go. Had I not worked the first job, I certainly wouldn't have had a shot at the second company nor would I have had a productive experience when getting my MBA.
     
  15. jordane93

    jordane93 Member

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    :roll
     
  16. still.ill

    still.ill Member

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    I actually had an internship with an advertising firm, but it was pretty much unpaid digital slave labor, which is what a lot of internships nowadays basically are. Business Cards into Excel type of stuff.
    No need to be a **** though, seriously what was it worth to you to type the last two sentences of your post?

    I've decided on Law though cuz it seems the major things law schools look at is GPA and LSAT scores, and the basic law,business, and society class I took in college was one of the more interesting ones.

    I'm not going to waste a couple years fetching coffee for suits in NC.
     
  17. Weathered

    Weathered Supporting Member

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    Think very hard about whether you truly want to do law school - it can be interesting work, but unemployment rates for fresh lawyers tend to be high across the nation due to the fact that law schools are churning out more grads than there are jobs.
     
  18. A-Bone

    A-Bone Montonero, MOY, Multitudes Gold Supporting Member

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    There is a commonly quoted statistic (that is verified by the ABA) that about 70% of those with law degrees report that, if they had it to do over again, they would have chosen a completely different career path. This makes law the profession with the largest level of general dissatisfaction among practitioners. That having been said, those that practice public interest and criminal law tend to report an almost inverse level of professional satisfaction in the same survey (with 60+% reporting that they are quite content with their professional choice.)

    What does this mean for an individual contemplating law school? I think mostly it speaks to the idea that it is best to know yourself before embarking on this remarkable grind of a career path. There are a plethora of bad reasons to go to law school. Here are just a few:

    1. You did really well on the LSAT.

    The LSAT is a great, entertaining logical reasoning exam that is supposed to be a predictor of law school success (and, according to some surveys, it is). Of course, it does not replicate the academic environment of law school, or the marathon-like quality of actual law school attendance. All success on this test proves is that you are intelligent, and good at taking standardized tests.

    2. You want to earn a lot of money.

    Many will point out to you how well paid on the whole the profession of law is. And, compared to the general career prospects of those with only a Bachelor's degree , this is definitely true. However, you should consider that those working in the finance industry in major financial markets routinely earn bonuses akin to the salary of an associate in a large firm. So, not only is the pursuit of money for money's sake arguably a morally questionable choice (and rarely a sufficient drive to get someone through the rigors of law school academics), if you want to make the "big bucks", there are much more direct ways to get there. And this is setting aside that most lawyers won't get white shoe law jobs with big or boutique firms.

    3. You do not really know what you want to do, and you think law school will give you focus.

    It won't. Law school is great for those that are driven and have a strong sense of what they want to do. It is the worst kind of environment for the underconfident or the uncertain. The law school environment is academically competitive in a way that is unlike most undergraduate experiences, and it is also completely self-driven (even dramatically more so than an undergraduate education; most class grades are entirely dependent on a three hour exam at the end of the semester, reading load per class can be heavy and dense). You get out of it what you put into it, and you will get more out of it if you know where you hope to come out when you go in. This doesn't mean that you cannot change your mind while doing it; but you should only start if you have an end in mind.

    Additionally, consider that law school is quite expensive, even if you attend a public school. And, since most people do not make huge law money right out of law school, you should plan to carry the debt generated for many, many years. The debt also sometimes limits post school choice, or at least the perception thereof. If you are carrying around a six figure debt, which is common for law grads in this day and age, it looks a lot less feasible to go into a public interest area that does not pay well. Once you find yourself on the treadmill, it often seems difficult or unrealistic to get off.

    Now, do I regret going to law school? Not really. I don't necessarily want to continue in practice forever, but I will always remain proud of myself for seeing it through. It is quite the proving ground. Plus, it is always nice to have an advanced degree. The student loan debt, on the other hand, is a bit of a pisser.
     
  19. bayAreaDude

    bayAreaDude Member

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    Why grad school? Seems more like you need a bachelor's in something you can get a job with. Do you have money to pay for this or is it financed? Might be better to just take any job you can get an get another bs at night - and research career forecasts first this time.
     
  20. still.ill

    still.ill Member

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    This seems to be the case for MBA's as well though.

    My mom has a friend with a kid 5 years older than me who had a similar experience, he actually majored in English but got rejected from every grad school for creative writing, waited a year and applied to Emory, 2 years later with a degree in corporate law was able to find a job in New York City.
     

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