What to study for grad school?

Discussion in 'The Pub' started by still.ill, Aug 21, 2014.

  1. A-Bone

    A-Bone Montonero, MOY, Multitudes Gold Supporting Member

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    He got a law degree in two years?
     
  2. still.ill

    still.ill Member

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    Extremely informative, thanks, I will keep this in mind.
     
  3. bayAreaDude

    bayAreaDude Member

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    Have you done any other internships? If not, fetching coffee and business cards to excel is where you start and it may sound humiliating, but you should have done it after sophomore year. If you think you're above this, you have a rude awakening coming.
     
  4. Weathered

    Weathered Supporting Member

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    I'd be shocked if that were true. I can't speak for career satisfaction or feeling of "fit" post grad-school, but most full-time MBA programs require an internship between years 1 and 2, and provided you don't trip over your own shoes, that often results in an offer.
     
  5. JDutch

    JDutch Member

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    I had to apply to approximately 20 jobs a week, and go on approximately 3 interviews a week, for about 4 months when I graduated from college in 2005. After graduating from law school, I got a job at a top international law firm, but I had to apply to 100+ positions, because the economy sucked so much when I graduated in 2009.

    This country, at least for the time being, still is the greatest country on Earth, and there's opportunity everywhere, but you've got to stay positive, take personal responsibility, be willing to work hard and be dynamic because stuff, invariably, isn't going to go your way.
     
  6. JDutch

    JDutch Member

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    If you're talking about top MBA programs, I agree. However, there are a ton of schools pumping out business school grads every year that have no hope of finding a job that pays decently. If you don't get into a top program, regardless of what the field is, grad school likely will be a huge, expensive mistake.
     
  7. A-Bone

    A-Bone Montonero, MOY, Multitudes Gold Supporting Member

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    As much as it pains me to agree with this assessment, I'm pretty sure this is also the case.
     
  8. still.ill

    still.ill Member

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    Yes, I probably could have done 2 more similar unpaid internships during college. I just couldn't bear doing that again while my roommates got to shoot films and stuff.

    I agree I did feel above that, the rude awakening has already came.

    Maybe I should just take my 335 and a suitcase and hop on a one way ticket to LA and cut off all ties to family and starve to death, or do what that one hermit guy did in Maine and become one with the forest.
    At least that would be slightly more exciting, if only for a while as i Pawn the guitar for food, or get eaten by a bear in the woods.

    "kids these days eh?" #firstworldproblems
     
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2014
  9. Catch

    Catch Analog>Digital Converter

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    Wow. I mean that's the rub, right there. Potential writer hits brick wall of ivory tower and says, "Fine, I'll just make a bunch of money if they won't let me in..."

    Creative Writing programs are extremely hard to get in to--program directors and professors are looking for any indication they can find of special talent because they know for sure that everyone they admit will have ZERO prospects when they graduate. And yet they hope the training and passion they engender will see the writers through poverty and isolation. My program was rated as Top 10 in the nation by US News when I was there. I am glad I did it but always knew it would be a labor of love. For the record, one can write without an MFA, the degree may or may not help writing or publishing.

    But what an about face, seems like joining the creative class is a hard sell these days.
     
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2014
  10. Staggerlee

    Staggerlee Member

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    When you are ready to take responsibility for yourself and your choices is when things will clear up for you. And stop being a drama queen, it aint cute.
     
  11. still.ill

    still.ill Member

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    If anything you are the drama queen, you made a completely uncalled for personal attack without even knowing if I had done an internship or not, what antagonism did I display towards you previously to warrant that kind of post? Nothing.
     
  12. tnt365

    tnt365 Member

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    My story: got a bachelor's degree at my favored state college (go Ducks!). I applied there because my High School GPA meant no admissions letter. But wait, it gets better. Wanted to major in business but went with my passion in poli sci and history hoping to go to law school. Graduated and realized law school is $100,000. Worked for minimum wage for a year as my fiancé finished her required masters to teach elementary (excuse my laziness for not adding the hammer emoji). So I leaned two things really: 1) I want to be my own boss/manager, and 2) no more student loans unless I'm learning a trade that pays the bills. I now work for the family business as a manager not making nearly enough (I have $25,000 in federal loans to repay) and I'm doing just OK (aka I don't have Ebola). Oh, and I'm hungry, even if by force. Was college a waste? No I learned a ton about the world, America, and myself (not to mention it was a blast and I met some wonderful people), but I still wish it didn't cost me $20,000, and I wish my HS councilor didn't scare me into going to college straight out of HS. Well, that's my story, hope you are as bored as I am on a Saturday night *winky face* ... Lol

    Edit: forgot to mention how much I hate digital qwerty.
     
  13. LivingTheDream

    LivingTheDream Member

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    A large part of it also depends on where you live. I live in Ohio and trying to find work in this economy is proving to be a fool's errand.

    I have a Business Degree in Marketing, as well as plenty of experience with two Fortune 500 companies. My position was "down sized" in 2012, but I was able to find work. I have a job now but am trying to find a job that will pay me what I'm worth, as I am vastly under-employed.

    Trouble is, I can't seem to get my resume read. I've sent out dozens of resumes and so far have not received a phone call. Hell, I haven't even received a decline via email.

    Grad school for the OP may be a good thing because it may take another 5 - 10 years for the economy to improve enough to positively impact hiring. It's always nice to have a chair when the music stops.
     
  14. Throttleneck

    Throttleneck Member

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    I have two PhDs as well, but I did mine at the same time. I'd go back for another if I had the time. I like learning. :)
     
  15. Staggerlee

    Staggerlee Member

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    I guess they didn't teach you how to write resumes in Marketing school? Anywho, work on the resume and then when applying find a way to get in front of the decision maker. Make phone calls, follow up, ask around. Don't just send resumes and sit there waiting for something to happen. That's called Marketing. Picking up the phone and calling the hiring manager and telling them why they should call you in for an interview is called Sales.
     
  16. Staggerlee

    Staggerlee Member

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    Nothing personal at all actually. I didn't intern in college, but I worked an entry level job all throughout college and was eventually promoted. There is work in NYC, maybe not at the level you thought you were going to start at (like Director of Marketing), but they are there. You should have started somewhere even if it is lower paid to get experience not only to put on your resume but to get actual working experience that will teach you how to behave in the workplace.

    I am sorry, but you just don't sound very driven and ready to work. I suspect grad school is just another way for you to avoid the reality of grown up life for a little longer. I can't say I necessarily agree with this, but I have seen folks who have successfully "avoided" real life for a few years by going to grad school and eventually found well paying careers.

    I think you really need to reevaluate your priorities and show some commitment, drive and willingness to do whatever it takes to get a job and get the job done once you have it. The longer you stay unemployed the worse it is going to be for you. At least get a couple of years working experience before you decide to go to grad school. You will have a much better idea of what you want to study.
     
  17. LivingTheDream

    LivingTheDream Member

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    Your advice is really cute. But the 1960s are over, and the world operates a bit differently now.

    As an experiment, I challenge you, as well as others here, to try to land an interview --- regardless of whether or not you have a job or are satisfied in your career. You may be surprised at what happens; ........... or doesn't happen.
     
  18. Staggerlee

    Staggerlee Member

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    I've had interviews with 3 different places in the past 1.5 months. In at least two cases, I had to research the hiring manager and reach out to them directly. One even said she was very impressed by my approach.

    My point is that the game is way more competitive than ever and you have to bring your A game to the table. I mean that seriously. You cannot be passive, you have to knock on doors and get your name out there.
     
  19. THebert

    THebert Member

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    I haven't read further than this but I would suggest an attitude check. No amount of degrees in the world will get rid of a sense of entitlement in regards to your thinking that a degree will get you success as compared to the mindset that hard work will get you success. Your internship was "slave labor" working for "suits." This is the talk of someone who wants to rebel against the system rather than becoming successful within it. Your college has let you down if they fostered that line of thinking. I know someone who has a degree in General Studies and was president of a bank by age 45. The degree actually matters less than you think- personal variables are more important for success. This same person once commented to me "it is remarkable what can be accomplished when you have the right attitude." So please forgive me for being so direct but this relates in part to the so-called crisis in education in that too many students think the degree alone will give them success and they don't realize how hard they must work even if they have the degree.
     
  20. enharmonic

    enharmonic Old Growth Gold Supporting Member

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    I have a business degree that I never use. It's a "check the box" requirement for the jobs I've had over the last 10 years. I was very resentful of the time I had to "waste" in college to get the degree, but the truth is, I wouldn't have been able to get my foot in the door at the companies I've worked for had it not been for the degree.

    I applaud anyone who seeks higher education for the genuine love of the subject matter. I have an interest in so-called "big data", and wouldn't mind pursuing a masters in Data Analytics...partly because I'm intrigued by how data is being manipulated all around us in our daily lives, but also because there's a certain charm to doing something for an employer that the layperson doesn't understand. It keeps a certain level of heat off of you in the corporate world when the squirrels don't know how to bust your balls :)
     

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