What to study for grad school?

Discussion in 'The Pub' started by still.ill, Aug 21, 2014.

  1. dysorexia

    dysorexia Senior Member

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    Says the guy that lives off his wife's income. Grow a pair. :facepalm
     
  2. Staggerlee

    Staggerlee Member

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    Excuse me! Not married, yet anyway. And yes, my fiance does make more than me, but by no means do I live off of her income. Don't know where you dug that out, probably from some old post or something. In any case, what exactly do you find wrong with that I said?
     
  3. still.ill

    still.ill Member

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    This is sort of the general idea here...... If "real life" constitutes working overtime all the time for minimum wage, having people hang up on you 300 times a day, having to meet a phone call quota and being paid entirely by commission,

    I'll take going back to school if it can make the slightest chance I can do something more interesting.

    Hell, this part of your post alone makes my approach seem valid.. ... seems like those folks you knew were in the same situation as me, went back to school, and are now happier for it.
     
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2014
  4. chrisjw5

    chrisjw5 Member

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    Part of growing up is learning to avoid trolls named after bad 60's songs who sound like they're prepping bad career/motivational books with titles like:

    "Bring Your A-Game To The Table: Success Tips from a Success-Driven Man in a Success-Driven World"

    And "Achieving Perfect Clarity: Huddling Up With Your Inner Winner"

    - by noted forum cliche-slinger Staggerlee





    You started out insulting him and have now delved into quoting bad cliches that sound ripped off from LinkedIn.
     
  5. All_Thumbs

    All_Thumbs Member

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    I graduated college with a degree in English Lit. I didn't really think about what I was going to do at the time. I ended up working in some fairly basic jobs for a few years (e.g., entry-level laboratory tech taking measurements all day for just over minimum wage). I got tired of that, went to law school because that was what several friends of mine had done, and got a degree.

    I ended up in a job that is tolerable but not particularly interesting to me. I am essentially counting the days until I can afford to retire, and have been for some time. It's not a bad job, but it requires long hours and it's not really what I want to be doing with my time. It's only advantage is that it is relatively lucrative.

    In retrospect, having been doing what I am doing for almost 20 years now, I wish that I had done something different. To be more specific, when I was only a few years out of college and decided it was time to make a change, I wish that I had been more thoughtful in deciding what I wanted to do with my life. The result of my thoughtlessness was not a disaster, but it wasn't particularly great either.

    I think you are at a turning point and you should really think long and hard about your next step. You are making a potentially life-changing decision here. Do some research, the Internet is great for that. Try to avoid doing something just for the sake of doing something, and to find something that actually interests you. Don't just go with the flow or make a convenient choice (like going to grad school just to put off working a few more years).

    With hard work and a little luck, you can make almost any reasonable career choice a successful one. And if you can find something you are passionate about (and I have a few friends that have managed this), then hard work can seem more like a privilege than a duty.
     
  6. KarlH

    KarlH Supporting Member

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    All thumbs... Are we the same person?
     
  7. still.ill

    still.ill Member

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    What would you have done if you could turn back time?
    I actually did the same sort of lab job in high school as well, with pipettes and stuff (dad is a biology professor)
     
  8. mmolteratx

    mmolteratx Member

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    That's a pretty atypical experience, TBH. My dad was an attorney, I had part ownership in his firm for a while, and my mom runs the client database at a large firm in Austin, and it's exceedingly difficult for recent law grads to land the job they want these days, unless they went to a top 10 law school and finished in the top quartile or even 10% of their class. Older attorneys aren't retiring like they used to, there are tons of people like you who don't really know what they want to do getting a law degree, an economy in recovery, etc. The pool of applicants is huge, and the number of openings is small.

    Also of note is that attorneys tend to hate their jobs. I'd say 9 out of 10 that I know are just in it for the paycheck. I'm not entirely sure about other fields of law, but my dad's firm dealt specifically with corporate/securities law for the most part, and the hours were ****, the clients were ****, the travel was ****, etc. My dad got probably three weeks of real vacation the last 10 years of his life, and worked himself into an early grave at 50 with all of the stress. Was a real wake up call for me, considering I was on a path to go into the same career.

    And on the topic of law school, it's not a place for the indecisive. Internships tend to revolve around first year performance, and they tend to lead to job offers if you're half competent. But it's not enough to just do well in your classes. You've got to do better than everyone else. It's one of the most competitive environments in the world, and hesitation will screw you over like nothing else.

    Yea, that's crazy. My dad did his in 2.5 years back in the 80s, but just barely.

    Depends on what tier business school you go to, IIRC. Like anything, the top schools tend to have extremely valuable industry connections, which are probably the biggest benefit of a grad degree.
     
  9. RocksOff

    RocksOff Member

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    Networking is a major component of all grad school work, regardless of field. Conferences and taking advantage of your committee member's contacts is a good way to get the ball rolling, as it were. Even in smaller and less distinguished schools, professors might have excellent contacts. Choose your school based on the professors you can study under.
     
  10. BMX

    BMX Member

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    If you got an A in stats without trying get a degree in that. Another option you might find interesting is data mining. If you go into data mining/business intelligence you will earn more money than you'll ever need.
     
  11. Ivan Durak

    Ivan Durak Member

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    My first thought was already posted: learn stats and R. Right now the tools of the marketing trade are changing, and cloud-based platforms which rely on data are the new "it". Couple knowledge of SAS, or R etc with some of these platforms (Hybris for example), and you're very much employable.

    For a free try-out, check Coursera's data science course. Tough but a good foundation. There are some probably very good online masters in "data science" right now, including by NYC (or Columbia?), Berkeley etc.

    Stats can be boring, depends on how you look at it. Marketing can be extremely boring and futile. Heck, business sucks most of the time. Btw: I worked in brand management, CRM and marketing strategy for 10 years.

    Don't go the route of the MBA unless you get into a top program (top 15 US or 15 worldwide) and have a lot of $$$ to throw at it.
     
  12. bayAreaDude

    bayAreaDude Member

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    I could land 5 interviews in a day if I wanted because demand exceeds supply in my field, which I chose specifically because of this situation. It's really that simple. My voicemail inbox fills up weekly with unsolicited calls from recruiters. Don't spend money or go into debt for an already overpriced education unless you have done the research to know the forecasts for labor in that career. Unless you're rich and can afford to spend loads of money learning about subjects you enjoy that people don't get paid to do.
     
  13. Rimbaud

    Rimbaud Tarnished Silver Gold Supporting Member

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    I'm the guy from post #30 that got the somewhat useless MA in English Lit.
    Didn't want to teach, took a Civil Service Test for Social Worker at a County Welfare Office...
    Came in third out of 320 so I found out I was pretty good at that type of testing.
    It wasn't a bad gig, helping people and I was still that romantic poet type guy with the Sixties outlook.

    Another CS test pops up..this one for Criminal Investigator...took the test, came in fourth, took the job...went through training and hit the streets dressed like Sonny Crockett from Miami Vice, (this was the Eighties) with a Glock 17 strapped to my hip and a tin badge hanging from a chain around my neck.

    I ended up loving that job even though it was the complete anthesis of what I thought, or who I thought I was.
    I got promoted twice, turned down the third because I would have been desk bound like my fat lazy bosses with bad Detective moustaches.
    I led a pro-active squad of hand-picked guys and gals that loved their jobs as much as me..7 people in the unit...only one guy with a degree in Criminal Justice....

    Just trying to say that you can switch horse in the middle of a stream...seems like you are young with plenty of miles left on you.. I hated 'the suits' too, we did all the work, they got their fat arsed pictures in the paper, deal with it, certain things you have to do t,o get ahead...
    I can think of about six or seven cliches I could throw at you now but, I think you've been chastised and belittled enough by some small-minded, mean spirited peeps already who obviously aren't happy with themselves...
    Whatever you decide to do, Good Luck my man.
     
  14. starjag

    starjag Member

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    Many business schools now offer MSc degrees in data analytics. This is, of course, stats based, but concentrate more on the practice and use of stats rather than the theory.

    Given that you have a business degree, pursuing something like this might be possible and likely give you some of the technical advantage without going to a math/stats degree.

    Check schools that offer MSc (*not* MBA) in business and/or data analytics.
     

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