What type of guitar owner are you?

What type of guitar owner are you?

  • The Tom Morello: You own (or want) one or two workhorse guitars, and you're good with that.

    Votes: 245 32.3%
  • The Tim Pierce: You own (or want) a variety of guitars, so you're prepared for anything.

    Votes: 399 52.6%
  • The John 5: You have one kind of guitar you like, and you own (or want) a sh*tload of them.

    Votes: 52 6.9%
  • The Joe Bonamassa: You indiscriminately buy everything.

    Votes: 62 8.2%

  • Total voters
    758

Digidog

Member
Messages
2,595
Ok: Two Strats, one RG and one CS336; looking out for a jazz box. Does that make me a Tim?

I think it does, so I voted thusly.
 

StratmanSteve

Member
Messages
808
Tim Pierce-ish tendencies, although I think I have 5 teles.
Same here except I have 5 Strats . . . 6 if you include the Strat XII. Also, 2 LPs, Epi Dot, Tele, Jazzmaster, Cyclone, P-Bass and a Squier Bass VI.
I'm done buying guitars, but pedal purchases are another subject.
 

monwobobbo

Member
Messages
6,063
went with workhorse option though i'd need 2 guitars. i figure if i have humbuckers and single coils covered then i'm good. of course in a studio situation you might want to layer something else in but live i'm good with 2.
 

JaiRamana

Member
Messages
1,206
In thinking about this, I am none of the above. I am 80% utilitarian, in that my guitars must be above everything else precise enough to have as close to exact intonation as possible on a guitar, which means the action has to be capable of being set quite low ( which is why I prefer Asian guitars, they almost always meet this criteria), they have to be ergonomically a fit for my body so that standing with one performing is not fatiguing, they have to be well enough made to last with high enough quality wood to resonate well ( again, Asian), and have good enough electronics to allow the guitars traits to shine.
Which is why I alter most of my guitars electronics.
In other words they are tools. The tools I use to work on wood or mechanics all have a place, are all kept clean, and are all well taken care of. So are my guitars.

The other 20% deals with appearance, which I also alter (I have refinished many of my guitars because I didn't like the color, lean more toward sunburst finishes), and with the fact I like to experiment with various electronics designs.
And the fact I consider them to be works of art.
I have a lot of guitars, because I put so much work into them to get them just right I dread getting rid of them even after I have moved on to a different main instrument, and because I become so attached to them. They are like having pets.

So I don't suppose I really fit into any particular stereotype.
I also suppose there are those who know me who think I am a bit eccentric about them.
Which, lets be honest, eccentric is just a nice name for nuts.
Ever tried a Parker Fly? They were the most accurate guitars (intonation, etc.) ever tested. And weigh 5 lbs. Amazing guitars. I just ended up going more vintage, but I gigged with my Fly for many years. Sold it when I wasn't playing electric because I do not believe a guitar should exist in a case only. It should be played. Wouldn't mind getting it back, but because it was Mahogany only (my mistake back when) I can leave it be. Mahogany should always be paired with maple in my view. Either one is incomplete without the other or something very similar to be paired with.
 
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Cerpin Taxt

Member
Messages
532
I sorta just want one of everything in terms of the most popular guitar "styles" or models. For example I got an HM Strat that's almost more like an Ibanez with 24 frets, Floyd Rose and a humbucker. I have another more standard Strat style guitar with single coils and hard tail. A MIM standard Tele. An Agile Les Paul knock off. I still wanna get a Jazzmaster, and an ES-355. Don't really care for any Rickenbacker, nor the SG. That'd be enough for me to have my bases covered, I think.
 

kludge

The droid you're looking for
Silver Supporting Member
Messages
7,109
I'm a Pierce but leaning toward Morello. With acoustic guitars right now, I'm at a dead stop. I have six. Two six strings and one twelve-string sound so amazing that I don't think I can find better, only different. Another six string is very sentimental (it was my only guitar at one point) and fun to play. The last six string is sidelined for now, but might well fit in the direction I seem to be heading (it's a fingerpicker, and I'm doing a lot more alternate-tuned fingerpicking). Finally, there's an old nylon string Harmony I paid $25 for that occasionally gets use for recording.

Electric is almost as stable. I have four right now that all get played regularly, plus two work-in-progress partscasters that will likely see a fair bit of work as well.

I'm just not into buying guitars anymore. I already have a bunch of them, and don't feel like there are any big holes. A resonator, maybe.
 

LikeAMotherF

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
2,629
I'm definitely a Piercer. I've got the following:
LP Goldtop w/P90s
LP Jr DC P90
335
Firebird
Strat w/typical SSS
Strat w/3 Firebird minihumbuckers
Jazzmaster
Rickenbacker 330
Ampeg Dan Armstrong

I just sold a killer LP style guitar with 2 HB. So I need something to fill that hole. I should probably sell one of my LPs, because I don't really need two with P90s. But the Goldtop was my first really nice guitar, and the Jr is the one I feel most at home with. So they're both staying put. Honestly, at one point I owned 6 guitars, and 4 had P90s, one was the Ric (which is in the P90 camp anyways) and then I had a Cabronita. I needed to spread out my options a little more, and I have.

However, with some major oral surgery on the horizon, I have a feeling that I'll soon be a Morello, with two LPs with P90s! :(
 

JaiRamana

Member
Messages
1,206
I get stuck because as it is with 8 guitars now, it's really too much to play and I hate a guitar not getting played. And then there's string changing time. I mean, I'm an Elixer guy, so my string changing is about once every 6 months but with 8 guitars...it's still a lot.

I traded an ESP amber EC1000 for one of the Taylor GS Minis (wasn't playing electric at the time and didn't even have a tube amp). This guy had more guitars than a music store in his house! I mean the house was dedicated to a sea of guitars, acoustic, electric, eclectic, he had it all. Hundreds. What would we call that guy? I want to call him, "Guitar Center". But really I think he had more than even most guitar centers have in stock.
 

Rockledge

Member
Messages
5,557
Ever tried a Parker Fly? They were the most accurate guitars (intonation, etc.) ever tested. And weigh 5 lbs. Amazing guitars. I just ended up going more vintage, but I gigged with my Fly for many years. Sold it when I wasn't playing because I do not believe a guitar should exist in a case only. It should be played. Wouldn't mind getting it back, but because it was Mahogany only (my mistake back when) I can leave it be. Mahogany should always be paired with maple in my view. Either one is incomplete without the other or something very similar to be paired with.
I haven't, I have known guys who had them. I may get one some day, but they seem to me to mostly be a guitar you use with a rack of FX, which I tend to use just a guitar and amp with perhaps a couple of stomp boxes, but most often just the guitar and amp. I didn't know they were mahogany, I always assumed they were composite because of their tone.
I don't really care for the Parkers tone, as I say it seems to be more geared toward FX.

I agree about mahogany/maple
I do have a couple of mahogany guitars that don't have maple caps, one is an old Yamaha SBG series. But in general you need a maple cap on a mahogany body to get the sustain and those warm but present highs. My most used double buck guitars have maple caps.
 

JaiRamana

Member
Messages
1,206
I haven't, I have known guys who had them. I may get one some day, but they seem to me to mostly be a guitar you use with a rack of FX, which I tend to use just a guitar and amp with perhaps a couple of stomp boxes, but most often just the guitar and amp. I didn't know they were mahogany, I always assumed they were composite because of their tone.
I don't really care for the Parkers tone, as I say it seems to be more geared toward FX.

I agree about mahogany/maple
I do have a couple of mahogany guitars that don't have maple caps, one is an old Yamaha SBG series. But in general you need a maple cap on a mahogany body to get the sustain and those warm but present highs. My most used double buck guitars have maple caps.
The Parkers with DiMarzios, I agree. I've never liked anything DiMarzio puts out because they all sound like an Ibanez to me and not in a good way. And yes they had some interesting models, some much more geared towards hi-tech digital stuff. But that's not what I liked. I liked the Mojo series which was similar in design in many aspects, but also more standard. If I had mine again, I'd just get rid of the piezos /active pickup system and put some dB passive humbuckers in it and be happy.

I had a Mojo as I said, which came in two configurations (mahogany or mahogany and Maple top, which I should have gone for). It had SD Pups. Don't get the Fly's twisted, they are great tube amp guitars and will blow your mind with their sustain and tone. That guitar I could FEEL in my hands, it resonated so much. They have stainless steel frets and a thin carbon fiber fretboard and the process of constructing them was state of the art producing the most accurate fretboards ever made (at least at that time). I remember reading that they put it on high end machine used to really assess a guitars accuracy in no uncertain terms and the Fly was the most accurate they had ever tested up to that point. It also has a graphite truss rod 5x stronger than steel. Those guitars will never wear out unless you screw up the space age glue that holds the frets on the carbon fiber. Clean it with water, lasts forever. Tremolo system from space, could be hard tail, dive only or floating at the flick of a knob basically. I left mine in dive down mostly, strat guy that I am at heart.

Yes, maple cap is key on a LP style guitar at least (in my book). (Maple neck is key on strat style guitars). That's where I went wrong with my fly. Don't get me wrong it sounded incredible, but was darker than it needed to be and I should have put out the extra $250 for the flame maple cap (was beautiful to boot). Had push/pull single coil on tap and I used the hell out of the neck pick up that way (strat guy that I am at heart ;)). It could cover any style.

That 5lbs made 4 set, 4 hour gigs so much more tolerable! Try one out some time, you may be surprised. Hard to find for less than $1500 though. The Night flys were bold-on versions, but the best are the neck through. Oustanding stuff.

I've grown to like the imperfections of Strats and Les Paul style stuff so not sure I'll ever go for the perfect guitar in one again, but if I do, I know where to look.

Ebay!

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Parker-Mojo-Flame-Electric-Guitar-Blue-over-Flamed-Maple-Top-Seymour-Duncans/303055635503?_trkparms=aid=888007&algo=DISC.MBE&ao=1&asc=20131227121020&meid=d7bb47bb9a2b4d3d88d460de7f2f819c&pid=100009&rk=1&rkt=1&sd=254180494957&itm=303055635503&_trksid=p2047675.c100009.m1982
 
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Alton

Member
Messages
1,151
Don't know where I fit in. Mostly Gibson/Gibson-esque guitars. I do have a Mexi strat and a Martin acoustic. As the years roll on I sometimes think some of this stuff should go away and then, just like magic, another amp or guitar appears! Weird!
 

HERSCHEL

Member
Messages
5,351
I think I'm a Paul Stanley: I have a variety of guitars, from a variety of brands, usually with something unusual or different about them from the original models, modern features yet still able to get classic tones.
 




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