what was English water in the early/mid 70s?

RichusRkr

Silver Supporting Member
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881
Think about the creativity, musicianship of what was coming out of Great Britian in the early to mid-70s. What was going on?

Yes: Fragile, The Yes album, Tales, Relayer, Close to The Edge
The Who: Quadrophinia, Who's Next,
Emerson Lake and Palmer: Tarkus, Brain Salad Surgery,
Jethro Tull: Aqualung, Thick as a Brick,
Pink Floyd: Dark Side of the Moon, etc
Genesis: The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway,

and in a less progressive but amazing nontheless:
Deep Purple: Machine Head....
Black Sabbath: Paranoid to Sabbath bloody Sabbth..
Led Zeppelin 2 to physical Graphitti

I know I'm missing alot but these come to mind.

Was it the influence of the wake of the beatles? supportive musical communty? A less controlling music industry? Good drugs? Some inspired stuff was coming out from 70 to 74.. ya we had good new rock coming out of US also but this level of creativity coming out of Britian was amazing....
 
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RichusRkr

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
881
yup. but what I'm talking about really started in 1967 with Sgt Peppers (and Are You Experienced). but 1970 was a major increase in creativity lasting until about '76 and pretty much died with punk and disco
 

RichusRkr

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
881
Could Flouride be the reason for the dumbing down of American musical tastes????

Germans seem to like such better music.. do they use flouride?
 

RichusRkr

Silver Supporting Member
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881
hey wait, I'm derailing my own thread.... stay on topic!!!

unless it is all about the flouride....!
 

Defendant

Member
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6,604
certainly not floride.
Haha!

I always found it interesting that the masculine rock thing pretty much died in the UK in the mid 80s.

So Britain went from producing most of the great rock bands and guitar heroes (and inventing metal) to the smiths and the cure. By the time the 90s came around it becomes a struggle to think of brit hard rock and metal bands of note.

It's like everyone became vegetarian or something...
 

27sauce

Member
Messages
36,578
Haha!

I always found it interesting that the masculine rock thing pretty much died in the UK in the mid 80s.

So Britain went from producing most of the great rock bands and guitar heroes (and inventing metal) to the smiths and the cure. By the time the 90s came around it becomes a struggle to think of brit hard rock and metal bands of note.

It's like everyone became vegetarian or something...
On a related note, my mother in law is Italian(actual Italian, not Italian American) and she listens to the worst contemporary Italian music. I have to ask her, "what the hell happened over there?" A place with such a rich musical heritage, Scarlatti, Vivaldi, Verdi...
 

Poppa Stoppa

Member
Messages
2,224
It was the 60s that laid the foundations for it. We had the two royal families - the Beatles and the Stones, setting the pace and so far out in front. Behind them we had the likes of the Kinks and the Who. Not forgetting the Yardbirds and the blues boom - the Chicken Shack, Fleetwood Mac, John Mayall, can't fail blues. Wow what a scene. Then came Eric and Cream, blazing & burning. Then Jimi landed out of nowhere...and shortly afterwards, Zep came out all guns firing...

With all that going on in such a relatively small geographic area, it's no wonder that it set the scene and aspirations for some great musicians to follow.
 

johntoste

Member
Messages
1,540
Nature seems to work in rhythms, like inbreath and outbreath. So after the horrible suckage that was WW II (including the buildup and aftermath) came the glorious renaissance of musical beauty.
 

Bieling3

Senior Member
Messages
2,986
Part of it was that heroin was legal, pure, and available by proscription from the government.
 

seiko

Member
Messages
3,971
It was the 60s that laid the foundations for it. We had the two royal families - the Beatles and the Stones, setting the pace and so far out in front. Behind them we had the likes of the Kinks and the Who. Not forgetting the Yardbirds and the blues boom - the Chicken Shack, Fleetwood Mac, John Mayall, can't fail blues. Wow what a scene. Then came Eric and Cream, blazing & burning. Then Jimi landed out of nowhere...and shortly afterwards, Zep came out all guns firing...

With all that going on in such a relatively small geographic area, it's no wonder that it set the scene and aspirations for some great musicians to follow.
I'd look before that, mid-50s Big Bill Bronzy tours, The Shadows, 1958 Muddy Waters UK tour and Joe Meek's hits. The BBC had a bunch of live shows with blues artists touring on by 1960.

Remember also that groups like Johnny Kidd and the Pirates influenced the sound of The Who and the Kinks.
 




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