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What was the "good wood" era?

John Hurtt

Gold Supporting Member
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18,741
I see this term all the time with people selling Les Pauls...and I've seen it used on virtually every model year going back into the late 90's. Is this something...or just another marketing deal?
 

Jayyj

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
7,281
It belongs up there with lawsuit and vintage as words you can magically sprinkle on any eBay listing and it will add multiple dollars to your listing. Couple with 'best I've ever played, but it's time to thin the herd' for maximum effectiveness. It seems to be most common on 90s guitars where vintage is beginning to become too much of a stretch for all but the most optimistic of eBay sellers

Not to say they didn't use good wood in the 90s but they didn't have anything magical that they didn't use before or since.
 

prototype

Member
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3,549
the only real way to know if a guitar has "good wood" is to build it, finish it, and play it for a few decades to see how it sounds. there is simply no consistent logical way to determine if a piece of wood is going to sound "toneful" until its been used to make a guitar, and even so until that guitar has been played-in for a good period of time.
 

Guitar Josh

Resident Curmudgeon
Gold Supporting Member
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18,720
It is something that a person with a 15 year old Gibson talks about as he posts his listing on the emporium.
This made me LOL. :)

Regardless of the truth of the statement, it typically refers in my experience to Gibsons built between 1998-2005. I own 9 from this era and they are excellent representations of the models. I have also played many from this era that are also dogs.
 

John Hurtt

Gold Supporting Member
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18,741
This made me LOL. :)

Regardless of the truth of the statement, it typically refers in my experience to Gibsons built between 1998-2005. I own 9 from this era and they are excellent representations of the models. I have also played many from this era that are also dogs.
Why that time period? Did something change in 2006?
 

Junkhead

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
257
I always think of good wood as sustaining only, not tone. The general tone of the wood should be be the same across all quality of wood no matter how dense it is, mahogany is mahogany etc.., to a degree of course.

To test how good a guitar sustains compared to other I always imagined having a robot picker to pick exactly the same with the same amount of pressure applied, then measure the vibration of the body and or sound levels and then apply a rolling average for each. Automation is my thing so I am always thinking of ways to do things like this. No idea how or if guitar makers actually test sustain levels other than by playing the guitar.
 

Guitarworks

Member
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10,163
1989-2005. There is truth to it, despite all the negativity and despite whatever claims Gibson is behind it. During that period, PRS was pretty much eating Gibson's lunch, so Gibson really stepped up their QC, material quality, build quality and color palette in an effort to actually compete with PRS and put out a product as good as or better than PRS. The result was a lot of high quality instruments in the market from Gibson during those years, and those examples are now fetching more money because buyers notice a positive difference in those guitars over the examples that were made since 2006, which is when Gibson seemed to abandon the idea of competing with PRS, and focused on cutting corners instead.
 

hotrats73

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
2,604
1989-2005. There is truth to it, despite all the negativity and despite whatever claims Gibson is behind it. During that period, PRS was pretty much eating Gibson's lunch, so Gibson really stepped up their QC, material quality, build quality and color palette in an effort to actually compete with PRS and put out a product as good as or better than PRS. The result was a lot of high quality instruments in the market from Gibson during those years, and those examples are now fetching more money because buyers notice a positive difference in those guitars over the examples that were made since 2006, which is when Gibson seemed to abandon the idea of competing with PRS, and focused on cutting corners instead.
I think the Henry bought Gibson in the late 80s and 2006 was around the year they started the chambering thing and all the other funny things they did during the years.

it's more likely that this has been a period of time without internet and without wired ideas form Gibson, and people like to think and talk about that period as a good era and a good selling point.

I'm not sure this has anything to do with the wood used in the guitars.
 




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