What would it take for a new band as big as the Beatles to come out and make

Discussion in 'The Sound Hound Lounge' started by Dr. Tweedbucket, Aug 21, 2019.

  1. vanderkalin

    vanderkalin Member

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    Keep in mind that when Beatle mania broke, their music didn’t have substance. I Wanna Hold Your Hand? Please.
     
  2. Think Floyd

    Think Floyd Member

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    I have to disagree. IMO, those early songs were simple, to be honest, but they were full of emotion. I don't know why, but when most people here on TGP think about the Beatles it's always their later music. To me, when I think of them the first thing that always comes to mind is those early songs played by the band that sparked Beatlemania. Later, they stopped touring and became a studio band. I admit they put out some ground-breaking music in the studio, but NOT ONE of their later songs could ever touch me as much as something simple like Please Please Me! Actually, when I think about it, I consider them to be two separate bands, and I prefer the early version.
     
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  3. murraythek

    murraythek Member

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    Totally disagree. That song was full of the fervor and energy that mesmerized teens back in the early 60's.
     
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  4. ceeceevee

    ceeceevee Member

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    Like many others on this thread, my position is that it will not happen again. For all the reasons already stated: fragmentation of music genres, distractions, etc.

    To me, it goes way beyond the music itself: if the Beatles turned up today, they wouldn’t make it as big either. They might not even be in a band but in startups.

    The cultural context in which the Beatles became a global phenomenon was completely different. The generational gap between teenagers and their parents in the early 60’s was not just about age but also mentalities - pre and post-war, conservative attitudes struggling to uphold the fabric of society against younger minds who were looking for completely new experiences from what their parents had known. The rockers of the 50s were the first salvo but the music was still too raw, too exotic to really go global.

    Pop Music was an easy, accessible uniting force to the youths of that era, a medium that could reach every strata and influence all sorts of trends. Pop music as a concept was also relatively young, not quite a blank canvas but still, primed for experimentation and innovation. Couple that with a growing population of teenagers and twenty somethings eager to absorb anything new and different s and you have a good recipe for something big to happen. The Beatles were that thing.

    Today, this could not happen through music anymore, because, in the grand scheme of things, music is not the uniting platform it once was and the prime movers (i.e. people between 15-25) aren’t that interested in it. If you think about it, what makes the likes of Kanye or Taylor Swift huge in terms of influence is not their music , which is almost tangential at this point, it’s the technology. The power of social media platforms are just a reflection of what makes society move these days. A cultural snapshot of any era in the last 10 years is defined by what people were “doing” (eg what app they were using, what phones or devices they were using, what movies they were seeing) rather than by pop music, which to be frank, hasn’t changed much since 2005. Compare the hits of today to those of 10 years ago, and then listen to the evolution of pop from 1962 to 1970.

    Sorry for the rambling post.
     
  5. murraythek

    murraythek Member

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    The real answer to this is no one knows.

    I see comments on here about people comparing it to another Beatles. The circumstances won’t be the same! New genres of music are coming out all the time. A fresh, new and MODERN band could come along and take over the youth in a way that was similar to the Fabs.

    Problem the majority of folks are still looking at this under the Beatles microscope. It will be different, but it could be just as big as they were. No one knows abs that’s the great part because it will come out of nowhere and be FRESH.
     
  6. supergenius365

    supergenius365 Silver Supporting Member

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    Heavy use of Aeolian cadences.
     
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  7. stevieboy

    stevieboy Clouds yell at me Silver Supporting Member

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    It won't happen because the world of music is too big and fragmented. There are those that can come along and become really popular and sell lots of music and make lots of money, to rival The Beatles early success, today that's mostly in rap and hip hop, or in markets that aren't the US especially the Latin world and Asia with K Pop and all. But as far as making "everyone go completely crazy", the world is bigger and while those people can be huge, there are also really big segments of the population that won't notice them or even hear of them. Everyone heard of The Beatles, even people who were well beyond the youth demographic--not saying everyone liked them, but they sure were exposed to them. Of course not everyone in the world, but as far as the western world goes and big parts of Asia too they were almost unavoidable.
     
  8. GenoVox

    GenoVox Member

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    Things are completely different today... the way consumers acquire their music, and the endless depths of the media machine (social, mainstream & otherwise) - It all effects the way fame & popularity are achieved and maintained

    Therefore, there will never be a phenomenon like The Beatles again.... nor Elvis, nor Sinatra

    Because that level of popularity and influence goes way beyond just hit records... it's about fashion, pop culture, TV, films.... real industry-altering stuff
     
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  9. GenoVox

    GenoVox Member

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    Yep... one of the things that made The Beatles stand out was that they emerged at a time when pop music was still mired in I-IV-V and I-VI-IV-V progressions, and most of the Beatles' originals did not adhere to the same old, same old. Brian Wilson was starting to explore similar avenues during the same period.

    Dylan is famously quoted as saying "It's the chords, man... the chords!" when asked what he liked about the early Beatles
     
    Last edited: Aug 22, 2019
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  10. tnvol

    tnvol Ufologist Silver Supporting Member

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    Uhhh Nickleback? Hello!!!!
     
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  11. Vaibhav Joshi

    Vaibhav Joshi Member

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    It's tough to do revolutionary today & I don't know if there's a need in 'this' type of music etc. since we have already evolved beyond.
    Most ideas that capture the masses are stories well told (music+pics+videos+ agenda).
    Something in that vein, maybe. But a 1-4-5 isn't going to cut it anymore just like an over-driving tube with a Les Paul already arrived.
    But my suggestion is make the crowd smoke something & then they'll have the extraordinary experience but you'll have to smoke that yourself to experience it. I'm in :bong
     
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  12. StompBoxBlues

    StompBoxBlues Member

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    I agree with a lot of what you wrote. I think instead of dead, rock has gone underground. It’s become niche, but is still alive.

    I knew that the music companies hated the sixties, they got on the bus late, and hated that instead of them choosing the artists and having power over them, in those days it was more grass roots, that the kids picked their favorites and record companies then had to negotiate...I knew they made a concerted effort to gain control, using such as Disney kids groomed and promoted to grow their own pop stars.

    Still, I was totally blown away to read that the reality was even worse, regarding influences and diversity. One guy in Sweden for over a decade was THE person that wrote a hug percentage of hits.
    This book is a real eye opener.
    “The Song Machine: Inside the Hit Factory” by John Seabrook.

    But back to the Beatles. I agree, won’t happen again in the near future.
    I also was struck that though their arrangements and song, harmonies seemed simple they were really great and unique, but also being like lightning, hit at that time in that context. But also I think too that there was a feedback system happening too. That as they hit so big, and fans just wanted more, need and evolved, and even more sophisticated music, progressive, and knowing that they would be heard pushed them to new heights in composition and performance. Thank god they didn’t just rehash their big hits. Later on bands that had a breakthrough would be pushed by the record companies to make a new album “just like that last one” but some managed to grow.

    It’s control. It’s always that. I don’t feel like music is as important to many people today. Its more of an entertainment on par with video games for many, not deep, not aspiring to new, but you can hear that songs are just written to be hits.
     
  13. StompBoxBlues

    StompBoxBlues Member

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    The substance was in their arrangements and harmony in the beginning. That was substantial. The feel and sound. Later they evolved even more, and mostly their lyrics did (except for Ringos) too.
     
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  14. Doomrider78

    Doomrider78 Member

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    The music buying public is too polarized these days to allow one single band to rise to that level.

    I actually think it's good that we dont get phenomena like that now; not because polarization is good, but because mass market appeal breeds formula and stagnation.
     
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2019
  15. gtrbarbarian

    gtrbarbarian Silver Supporting Member

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  16. 8raw

    8raw Member

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    Massive talent, Great production, Management with a finger on the pulse of what's trending, and commitment from the band to stick together.
     
  17. Tidbit

    Tidbit Member

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    The Beatles were a product of the three T's

    Talent
    Timing
    and Technology

    Without all three of those things lining up in just the right combination, you will never have another Beatles. You may have a group that sells lots of records but that still won't match the impact of the Beatles as the culture has changed in innumerable ways (part of timing).
     
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  18. ZeyerGTR

    ZeyerGTR Member

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    The internet, video games, and the myriad other things taking peoples' free time and money away from music would have to disappear so that music would be a primary source of entertainment again. Music just doesn't take up the cultural bandwidth it did 50 years ago, and without that, it's impossible for any band to have the same kind of impact.
     
  19. Billy_B

    Billy_B Silver Supporting Member

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    40 years ago the hype machine dumped a lot of dollars into trying to make these guys the next Beatles.
    Never seen so much PR push over a band in my life.

    [​IMG]

    One hit wonder instead.
     
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  20. Litterick

    Litterick Member

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    On 17th May, Lana Del Rey released a cover of the 1997 Sublime song, Doin' Time, the writing credits of which are attributed to Bradley James Nowell, Rick Rubin, Adam Keefe Horovitz, Adam Nathaniel Yaunch, Marshall Raymond Goodman, Ira Gershwin, DuBose Heyward, Dorothy Heyward, and George Gershwin. Sublime's song made use of the Gershwins' and Heywards' song Summertime, while sampling jazz flautist Herbie Mann's bossa nova version, a single line from a song by the Beastie Boys and songs by Ini Kamoze, Malcolm McLaren and David Axelrod. DJ Ras MG contributed to the recording and was given a songwriting credit. Del Rey's version is thus a cover of two covers and several samples.

    This is the reality of contemporary pop music: endless covers and samples. It would be refreshing if a band arose to challenge this over-produced and derivative nonsense: a real pop group with two songwriters, a guitarist and an excellent drummer to hold it all together. Such a band would make its own songs in its own way, in recordings that would be instantly recognisable and influential, leading to many similar bands. But today's audiences might not be ready for something so radical.
     

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