What's Faster? Les Paul or Strat?

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by lpr9, Jan 21, 2020.

  1. lpr9

    lpr9 Member

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    Would love to get some input. I've noticed that as much as I love the feel of the Les Paul short-scale neck, I can play much faster on a PRS 25" or Strat 25.5". I'm wondering if the issue is NOT how big the neck is, but whether it's due to the strings tension on a longer-scale guitar causing the strings to respond quicker; if they spring back into position faster. We're talking fractions of fractions of a second, but on really fast runs I find that I am not as clean or fast on the Les Paul. Do you have theories? Thank you!
     

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  2. T Dizz

    T Dizz Member

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    I have big hands and feel like the 25.5 scale fits me better for playing fast especially above the 12th fret. That said, my collection is around 50/50 (Gbson scale vs. Fender scale)and my #1 for gigs is a Gibson.
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2020
  3. NortheastHick

    NortheastHick Supporting Member

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    I shred much more effortlessly on my Les Pauls than my strats, Even my Elite Strat with a compound radius fretboard.
     
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  4. Tag

    Tag Gold Supporting Member

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    RIP the fastest on my L5, Tele and Strat.
    All have 25.5" scales. It's not much faster, but its easier. Go up one gauge on your LP. Tension will be around the same.
     
  5. spencer096

    spencer096 Member

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    metaphor time...

    legendary golfer greg norman was playing a charity round with three donors, one of which was a huge fan of the shark. well that day greg norman was having some issues...not in a good mood...this guy pestered him the first few holes about what his problem was on the golf course. norman just replied "LOFT." few holes later, the guy asks norman again to which he only got "LOFT." the guy had no idea what norman meant. does he need more new clubs? does he need to adjust technique to hit the ball higher? and at the end of the round he goes to norman and asks "ive been thinking about this all day, what do you mean by loft?"

    "LOFT. LACK OF F*CKING TALENT."

    point being...practice more. the issue isn't tension or neck size...it's ability (i.e. talent derived from time practiced).

    you really wanna play fast? buy a crappy jazz box, throw 15's on it, don't adjust the neck so the action is a half inch high, practice on that 8 hours a day for a few months and then play a PRS with 10's. you'll fly like an eagle.
     
  6. CjRuckus

    CjRuckus Member

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    I learned on a 25.5 scale guitar so it always feels at home for me.
     
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  7. CaptNasty

    CaptNasty Member

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    I think that it is a personal preference. Some will find it easier to play fast on a LP, others on a strat.
     
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  8. LReese

    LReese Member

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    I present Exhibit A:

    [​IMG]

    I rest my case!
     
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  9. lpr9

    lpr9 Member

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    So,
    So, I've played 1-2 hours a day for roughly 50 years. I'm not a novice. I'm just pointing out that I play cleaner and faster on a longer-scale neck and I'm trying to figure out if there is some principle behind that. It might be as simple as the fact that I've played thousands of hours more on a long-scale neck than a short one.
     
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  10. amstrtatnut

    amstrtatnut Member

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    I get around much easier on my LP but, Im no shredder.
     
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  11. LarryWallwart

    LarryWallwart Member

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    To me this question is like saying which is faster? Asphalt or Concrete?

    The setup of the guitar is going to determine how fast you can play. String gauge. String Height. Comfort.
     
  12. spencer096

    spencer096 Member

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    lol i wasnt implying you were, just using a humorous anecdote.

    the bolded part is us being on the same page. there's enough of a difference between scale lengths to make a difference...esp when you add in pickup differences that typically accompany the change in scale length...that time and practice you have on longer scaled necks is likely the difference here, def not poo-poo-ing this. i just got a 335 a week ago and my number 1 is a strat...i still havent bridged that gap between the two, despite playing the 335 exclusively. but it's just a time and practice thing to making it up, nothing inherent in the respective designs imo.
     
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  13. Mtt02263

    Mtt02263 Supporting Member

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    I play faster on shorter scales typically, less string tension so I can pick lighter and quicker. I can play fastest and cleanest on my Hamer Studio, flattest board I have on any of my electrics.
     
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  14. metropolis_4

    metropolis_4 Member

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    I think it will largely depend on which you've spent the most time with. Technique is largely about muscle memory.
     
  15. CaptNasty

    CaptNasty Member

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    That is what I would suspect. You probably have over 25,000 hours on 25.5” scale guitars. It seems only natural to me that as a result, you would be more at home on a 25.5.
     
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  16. Will Onyx

    Will Onyx Member

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    Yngwie plays a strat.
    Case closed.
     
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  17. Phila67

    Phila67 Member

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    Scalloped frets though?
     
  18. monty

    monty Member

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    I find I whiz faster on a Strat scale instrument, maybe because of the tighter string tension or maybe I have plenty more hours on it- not sure TBH.
     
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  19. LReese

    LReese Member

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    I'm pretty sure scalloped potatoes too - for that totally tuber-lar tone!
     
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  20. singlecutarmy

    singlecutarmy Member

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    Honestly I don't think scale length matters much to me, it's really neck carve, fretboard radius, and upper-fret access, largely down to cutaways.

    My fastest guitars are my bich, legator and artcore, all double cut aways. After that I would say any of my single cuts are about the same, even though the black beauty is a slim D, the 1955I is a round C and the dean is some kind of thin soft V. Dean may be a little faster but like, IDK, depends on the day.

    If I was trying to nail a 12+ fret solo I'd go double cut every day, doesn't matter the scale length.
     
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