What's The Appeal (or not) of The Jazzmaster?

KoskineN

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
2,417
You just need your neck adjusted. Turn each of the 4 neck plate screws 1/4 turn. The guitar may make a popping/creaking sound when you do. If it makes the sound, examine your string spacing. You may find your strings are now aligned more properly (in your photo the high E is too far in towards the middle while, as you noted, the low E is too far towards the edge). If it now looks better aligned, tighten the screws back up and be happy.

If no sound OR the strings have not realigned, try tightening the screws while gently but firmly pulling the neck towards the lower bout. This should do the trick. If not - there’s something else going on I can’t diagnose online. BUT those strings (or really, the neck) are definitely out of alignment.
It's a good trick, but I tried it before with no real difference. The neck pocket is super clean, so there is nothing in the way. Seems like the screws don't give me much room to work with.
 

IAE

Member
Messages
2,643
You know, the SG body isn’t thick enough for the JM vibrato…meaning, for it to likely work correctly there’d need to be a hole in the back of the guitar where the spring is.

But, I suppose that’s just a Jazzmaster vibrato flaw….:D

See post below for context.
 
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IAE

Member
Messages
2,643
Considering it was such a dud when it came out, ( faults included ) - it mainly became popular because it was cheap, because nobody wanted them, seems like it`s a case of marketing proving it can sell anything, no matter how bad? - looks like you have to put the word "offset" in the description to sell anything, the more overpriced the better? I`ll stick to what I know and like that does the job and has being doing the job for me for the last 50 years, ie Les Paul, strat mainly!
Wrong on all points.

It was never a dud with faults. These “faults” people speak of only came to be when morons tried to put 9-42 strings on them. In the 1950s/60s people knew how to set them up and they had more sense.

It was hugely popular in the 1960s. Selling at full retail prices.

The Jaguar, followed by the Jazzmaster, were Fenders top of the line and most expensive models…they still are their most expensive reissues and remain hugely popular and beloved by many.

It’s funny how all these people complain about problems and yet there are none…unless you try to put stupid gauge strings on a guitar that wasn’t designed for it.

Let us put 8-38 on a baritone and then complain it wont work correctly…then let us start myths about poor designs.

Regards,
Busting Internet Fender myths since ‘99.

Side note: Since you stick to what you like why not stick to the threads you like and mosey on over to them.
 
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IAE

Member
Messages
2,643
No. P90's are very different from JM pickups. I own both.
My AV65's are warmer, noisier & have a kind of natural reverb about them.
I compared them to my son's Strat. Both run w/ flat EQ.

He said "It sounds so Surfy."

His SG w/ 57 Classics sounds like an L5 compared to my Jazzmaster.

I love SG's. Interesting idea about putting the JM trem on an SG.
That might be worth a try.
It was a joke, my friend.…though clearly not obvious to all. :p:D

I’ve been playing Jazzmasters, Jaguars, and Mustangs for decades. I own some P-90 Gibsons as well. So yes, P-90 and JM pickups are apples and oranges.
 

Silverback

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
939
You know, the SG body isn’t thick enough for the JM vibrato…meaning, for it to likely work correctly there’d need to be a hole in the back of the guitar where the spring is.

But, I suppose that’s just a Jazzmaster vibrato flaw….:D

See post below for context.

Darnnit! :cool:

The possibilities of that at first glance as a player.

Cranked through my Friedman, Oh man!
 
Messages
1,044
Wrong on all points.

It was never a dud with faults. These “faults” people speak of only came to be when morons tried to put 9-42 strings on them. In the 1950s/60s people knew how to set them up and they had more sense.

It was hugely popular in the 1960s. Selling at full retail prices.

The Jaguar, followed by the Jazzmaster, were Fenders top of the line and most expensive models…they still are their most expensive reissues and remain hugely popular and beloved by many.

It’s funny how all these people complain about problems and yet there are none…unless you try to put stupid gauge strings on a guitar that wasn’t designed for it.

Let us put 8-38 on a baritone and then complain it wont work correctly…then let us start myths about poor designs.

Regards,
Busting Internet Fender myths since ‘99.

Side note: Since you stick to what you like why not stick to the threads you like and mosey on over to them.
Agree on all points, though to be fair this thread is asking about the "appeal (or not) of The Jazzmaster", so it's within the scope of the OP's question. But I'll definitely admit those old "offsets are garbage" tropes are super tiring at this point.

Both can be set up for lower gauge strings (and I've heard of some using 9s), they just take more forethought and prep to do that (shimming the neck, different bridge, etc). Not much more work than changing string gauge on a Strat, which can also be a nuisance. Once those issues are sorted through, a Jazzmaster can be remarkably consistent and reliable instruments (not my experience of Strats personally).
 

Pete Dabell

Member
Messages
498
Wrong on all points.

It was never a dud with faults. These “faults” people speak of only came to be when morons tried to put 9-42 strings on them. In the 1950s/60s people knew how to set them up and they had more sense.

It was hugely popular in the 1960s. Selling at full retail prices.

The Jaguar, followed by the Jazzmaster, were Fenders top of the line and most expensive models…they still are their most expensive reissues and remain hugely popular and beloved by many.

It’s funny how all these people complain about problems and yet there are none…unless you try to put stupid gauge strings on a guitar that wasn’t designed for it.

Let us put 8-38 on a baritone and then complain it wont work correctly…then let us start myths about poor designs.

Regards,
Busting Internet Fender myths since ‘99.

Side note: Since you stick to what you like why not stick to the threads you like and mosey on over to them.
So that would make it a great guitar as long as you don`t bend any strings? It was so popular they discontinued the model? Considering that it was aimed at Gibson`s Jazz guitar market, it spectacularly failed to register there? ( although I did see a quote that someone thought Joe Pass might have used one once?) I must admit that I would be pretty annoyed to have to replace the bridge on my strat to make it play normally? I believe that Leo Fender wanted to use the Jazzmaster bridge on the Strat originally - but just couldn`t get it to work properly??? That`s why the launch of it was delayed whilst they figured out another system based on a knife edge scale. So yes, it was seen as a dud and they could be picked up cheap in the 70`s because they were so unpopular.
 
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jllopez

Member
Messages
238
So that would make it a great guitar as long as you don`t bend any strings? It was so popular they discontinued the model? Considering that it was aimed at Gibson`s Jazz guitar market, it spectacularly failed to register there? ( although I did see a quote that someone thought Joe Pass might have used one once?) I must admit that I would be pretty annoyed to have to replace the bridge on my strat to make it play normally? I believe that Leo Fender wanted to use the Jazzmaster bridge on the Strat originally - but just couldn`t get it to work properly??? That`s why the launch of it was delayed whilst they figured out another system based on a knife edge scale. So yes, it was seen as a dud and they could be picked up cheap in the 70`s because they were so unpopular.
This here - this is also part of the appeal. People saying stuff like this.
 

Zenyatta Mondatta

Supporting Member
Messages
1,208
So that would make it a great guitar as long as you don`t bend any strings? It was so popular they discontinued the model? Considering that it was aimed at Gibson`s Jazz guitar market, it spectacularly failed to register there? ( although I did see a quote that someone thought Joe Pass might have used one once?) I must admit that I would be pretty annoyed to have to replace the bridge on my strat to make it play normally? I believe that Leo Fender wanted to use the Jazzmaster bridge on the Strat originally - but just couldn`t get it to work properly??? That`s why the launch of it was delayed whilst they figured out another system based on a knife edge scale. So yes, it was seen as a dud and they could be picked up cheap in the 70`s because they were so unpopular.

Strats have a lot problems with the bridge too. You have to be motivated to figure out how to optimize them, just like with Jazzmasters.

Big hollow body guitars largely have the same challenges as Jazzmasters in regards to string angle and string bending - not ideal for the styles of music that were popular in the 70s. That doesn't make them bad guitars - different tools for different applications. No guitar design is without challenges.
 




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