What's your most controversial Led Zeppelin opinion?

Sam Hill

Member
Messages
696
The reason that Steve Howe always beat out Jimmy Page for Best Overall Guitarist in Guitar Player magazine's Reader's Poll is that Howe's the better musician in almost every way possible.

The only reason that nobody ever mentions this inescapable truth is that even Yes fans can only stand so much of that music before they throw the albums in the fireplace.
 

mycroftxxx

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
978
Here's some songs that J. Page played on-

...
The Who "Can't Explain" and "Bald Headed Woman" 1965
...
Half right. Page didn’t play a note on “I Can’t Explain”, a great Townshend song and the Who’s first single under that band name. It’s the Who and only the Who playing on it. The flip side was “Bald Headed Woman”, a song written by producer Shel Talmy and was there strictly to make money for Talmy - this was apparently a common practice at the time. Page played some guitar on that song, which is about as meaningless a song as exists in the Who catalog.

Oh, and it was 1964 in the US, early 1965 in the U.K.

You’re welcome :cool::rolleyes:
 

Flogger59

Member
Messages
12,065
He didn't really use Marshalls all that much in the studio until Houses of the Holy.

Zep I - Supro
Zep II - Rickenbacker Transonic, Dallas Arbiter Power One Hundred, Vox UL7120 Bass Amp, Jimmy Page Custom Hiwatt, Marshall amp for the Heartbreaker solo
Zep III - Jimmy Page Custom Hiwatt, Small Combo amps (per JPJ)
Zep IV - Jimmy Page Custom Hiwatt, Small Combo amps, including the Supro
Houses of the Holy on....- Marshalls, Small Combo Amps

I thought he had a 4120.

Any way, some of that stuff is one amp through another via the track output of the first amp being reamped in the second. The Leslie solo in Good Times sounds like reamped Supro, the bass on Heartbreaker is through a Leslie but pretty grindy. I have read that it was done on a lot of Presence using Marshall and Highwatt among other things.

On some defunct Hoffman forum there was a post about Black Dog. Direct into the Helios through two 1176s and triple tracked isn't the half of it.

Direct to the board, crush the input, first 1176 to track 1. Track 1 reamped to a small, close mic'd amp through the second 1176 to track 2. Track 2 reamped through a big amp in the same room as the small amp, but mic'd from the opposite corner ceiling. All done at once in real time, teetering on the edge of feedback.

I haven't heard the multitracks, but have heard that they are the hot mess you would expect. Don't have a clue how they could have beaten it into shape to make the final result.
 

Flogger59

Member
Messages
12,065
Beck is a great player, but I find he virtuosity as lack luster as most people find Jimmy's "sloopy


Little known fact that Jimmy used his bow on the very intro of 'In The Light'. Such a great song. The demo track for ITL, 'Everybody Makes it Through', is amazing too.

On acoustic guitars.
 

Flogger59

Member
Messages
12,065
It’s too bad that a good 70% of “Lemon Song” is a rework of Jeff Beck’s “Let Me Love You”, right down to the slowed down breakdown in the middle of the song.

Again, for all of the people who swear that “guitarists always copy from each other”...there are several examples of Page copying Beck. And yet, how many things did Beck take from Page? Zero.

They both got it from Hubert Sumlin.
 

ZENTISH

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,113
Half right. Page didn’t play a note on “I Can’t Explain”, a great Townshend song and the Who’s first single under that band name. It’s the Who and only the Who playing on it. The flip side was “Bald Headed Woman”, a song written by producer Shel Talmy and was there strictly to make money for Talmy - this was apparently a common practice at the time. Page played some guitar on that song, which is about as meaningless a song as exists in the Who catalog.

Oh, and it was 1964 in the US, early 1965 in the U.K.

You’re welcome :cool::rolleyes:
Thanks! I fixed it.
TISH
 

Flogger59

Member
Messages
12,065
No.

Sly and the Family Stone's "A Whole New Thing" beat Page to most of the studio production achievements he claims to have made, in 1967. All that "Distance equals Depth" nonsense he claims to have pioneered.

"A Whole New Thing" has ambient/reverbed drums in stereo - mixed louder than the guitar, Bass louder than everything except vocals, and upfront lead vocals just underneath the bass, with reverb fed into the opposite channel. You could literally take that album and only need to replace the horns and extra harmony vocals with Page's guitar and you'd have the exact mix signature from Zeppelin I and II.

I mean, just LISTEN to "I Cannot Make It" "Trip To Your Heart" or "That Kind Of Person". So much depth in the instrumentation, so many wonderful sounds in there. Fantastic production.

Thanks for the tip, I'll give it a listen.
 

Cordtz

Member
Messages
9
I never really got on the LZ train. Deep Purple was/is to me the superior band. Great musicians and great songs. And they were amazing live. Ohh and on top of that they had the mighty Jon Lord. The interplay between Lord and Blackmore was just magical.
 

shane8

Member
Messages
33,251
They both got it from Hubert Sumlin.
who got it from Robert Johnson ……. & so on …….

it's kinda interesting in fine art if you take an old master as a starting point and add your own thing no one takes you to task ….

eg - from wiki

Las Meninas is a series of 58 paintings that Pablo Picasso painted in 1957 by performing a comprehensive analysis, reinterpreting and recreating several times Las Meninas by Diego Velázquez. The suite is fully preserved at the Museu Picasso in Barcelona and is the only complete series of the artist that remains together.

:|
 
Messages
2,769
I thought he had a 4120.

Any way, some of that stuff is one amp through another via the track output of the first amp being reamped in the second. The Leslie solo in Good Times sounds like reamped Supro, the bass on Heartbreaker is through a Leslie but pretty grindy. I have read that it was done on a lot of Presence using Marshall and Highwatt among other things.

On some defunct Hoffman forum there was a post about Black Dog. Direct into the Helios through two 1176s and triple tracked isn't the half of it.

Direct to the board, crush the input, first 1176 to track 1. Track 1 reamped to a small, close mic'd amp through the second 1176 to track 2. Track 2 reamped through a big amp in the same room as the small amp, but mic'd from the opposite corner ceiling. All done at once in real time, teetering on the edge of feedback.

I haven't heard the multitracks, but have heard that they are the hot mess you would expect. Don't have a clue how they could have beaten it into shape to make the final result.

All hands on the board and rehearse the mix three or four times. With Zep they could print each one onto a two track master, not having issues of tape costs etc, and then decide later which mix worked.
 

thejbs

Member
Messages
479
Other than a few hard rock bands, and 1 or 2 indie rock bands, I don’t hear Zeppelin’s influence in music.
 




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