When did 50's & 60's instruments become so desireable?

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by pete74, Jun 29, 2020 at 3:19 PM.

  1. AdamSays

    AdamSays Member

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    It’s kind of the same thing with cars...right? People shell out huge money for a 60s corvette when there are modern cars that are faster, waaaaaaaay more reliable and have built in sat nav and heated/cooled seats. Heck a modern camaro has all of the creature comforts of this decade and would blow the doors off a old 60s corvette nd do so at LESS than 1/2 the price!
     
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  2. spi

    spi Member

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    If you're talking about Fender and Gibson, the 50s and 60s models became desirable in the 50s and 60s.
     
  3. Thesleepstalker

    Thesleepstalker Member

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  4. GiorgioV

    GiorgioV Member

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    Les Pauls became desirable very soon.

    I think one of the most relevant factors was Clapton playing a burst with John Mayall. The Beano album (1966) was a major hit in england and was very popular among US musicians. Lots of players both sides of the pond have gone on record saying that it was the reason they wanted a "cherry les paul".

    But in the late 60 those guitars were not available, Gibson wasn't making them anymore and even when they were reintroduced in 1968 they were goldtops with minihumbuckers. So 50s bursts immediately became a coveted thing.

    It's probably one of the major driving factors in kickstarting the whole vintage market of electric guitars.
     
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  5. Baxtercat

    Baxtercat Member

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    I recall another bump to the collectible biz was the old two-tone burst shown on the Layla LP in '70.

    [​IMG]
     
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  6. AaeCee

    AaeCee Member

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    They started to be coveted in the 70s, when no one was putting out a particularly stellar product.
     
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  7. tycobb73

    tycobb73 Supporting Member

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    Jimmy page preferred 50s and 60s gibsons to at the time current models (70s). That's when it all started.
     
  8. thecoworker

    thecoworker Member

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    Who built more desirable guitars than
    America?
     
  9. Guitarworks

    Guitarworks Member

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    '66-'70 or thereabouts is when demand first started to grow for electrics. Prewar Martins began to be sought out before that.
     
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  10. Gig Young

    Gig Young Vote twice Nov 3!! Gold Supporting Member

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  11. EarleG

    EarleG ® Silver Supporting Member

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    Seemed later '60s but start taking off more in the early '70s but not on a wide scale so
    fairly affordable baring bursts.
     
  12. RRfireblade

    RRfireblade Member

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    They played the best stuff that could be bought cheap. 10+ year old guitars were cheap used guitars. Like buying a used car on a budget.

    Wanna hear about all Hemi/Big Block/COPO cars I bought for a few hundred bucks and sold for peanuts back then? Today many of them are $100,000 cars.



     
  13. Mark Robinson

    Mark Robinson Gold Supporting Member

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    He had plenty of problems, weak and microphonic pickups mostly, tiny frets buried in excessive lacquer, junky cheapened hardware, string trees. Lots of stuff has been restored or improved. I don’t know where I read it but saw a story of Hendrix going through every Strat at Manny’s netting out ten, then parting together three or four, Clapton similar.
     
  14. deytookerjaabs

    deytookerjaabs Supporting Member

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    Listen to the interviews.


    Clapton cited he admired the pics of Buddy Holly on a Record with a maple board strat. Jimi Page said he knew of Freddie King with a Les Paul and that Clapton had already made a Les Paul with a Marshall a classic combo along with Peter Green. Add in Bloomfield to the equation.

    Eventually you see these greats were trying to get their hands on what their idols played. So, many of the big rock stars listened to the other rock stars and the hysteria was born. Then, the Japanese bit super hard in the 80's and it just grew from there.



    Ironically, the idols mostly didn't conform. Freddie King, Ike Turner, BB King, Johnny Watson, Buddy Guy and so many others who pioneered the 50's/early 60's guitars went on to newer guitars as they came available but that doesn't fit the hyperbole everyone religiously abides by.


    I've read of the extended period where a 50's strat was twice the value of the later rosewood models for some time thanks to Clapton. Then, SRV etc and the "slab board" strats were all the rage. I remember in the 90's that a veneer strat was undoubtedly inferior to slab boards. Then, all the sudden veneer boards were fine pieces of art too with killer tone. Then, any strat/tele with a lacquer finish was certainly vintage up until the polyester years where we are today.
     
    Last edited: Jun 29, 2020 at 11:28 PM
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  15. jazzkritter

    jazzkritter Member

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    Question to me is, how much of this vintage market will exist once the boomer collective is out of the picture?
    (Fair warning I’m a member.)
     
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  16. Jorge E aka ricv64

    Jorge E aka ricv64 Member

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    Hmmmm I kinda remember it being like this in my late 70's mindset . You'd hear about big musicians with a late 50's early 60's guitar but once you were in the store you liked that shiny scuff free new one . A few years back I was throwing away old BAM magazines. a free rag of the time , and noting sale prices at the local stores . One that stuck out was a early 60's Casino for like 300 when a new Les Paul was 650. Hindsite woulda grabbed the Casino
     
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  17. MikeMcK

    MikeMcK Silver Supporting Member

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    We might have walked past each other, then. I was there a couple Saturdays a month for a while. I remember the most expensive guitar on the street, an Explorer, at something like $2k, which seemed like a crazy amount of money for a guitar. Then a couple of '50's Les Pauls showed up for about that.
     
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  18. Buzzard Luck

    Buzzard Luck Member

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    Yes, It was in the 70’s and 80’s when the 50’s and 60’s guitars started to really get noticed and appreciated more by the discerning crowd.

    Hard to believe that 1980 was 40 years ago!
     
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  19. Mr Fingers

    Mr Fingers Member

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    First of all, the premise is wrong. Not all 50s and 60s instruments, by any means whatsoever, became desirable among players. We're really talking about Les Pauls -- not even Strats and Tele (because Fender kept them in production and the new ones were preferred) -- around 1965, for reasons that are abundantly documented. (Magic word, "Beano.") The gradual development of a broader vintage market is another matter, but here, too, the idea that these guitars are broadly desirable is wrong. Prices for most are not at all high in comparison to what the original seeling price, if it had been invested, would return today. The real price insanity is very, very limited.
     
  20. Jon C

    Jon C Silver Supporting Member

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    By ‘74 they already were (when I found my ‘62 Strat).
     

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